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Hi, sorry for making another bridge curve/shape topic, since there are already some out there, but instead of resurrecting an old topic, it might be better to make a new one.

 

So first let me start by saying I tried quite a few different bridge templates. Ive tried making my own template, using a 42mm radius, aswell as checking that to the 42mm radius playing surface. I downloaded a bridge template, but all seem to have the same problem. As I go up higher in positions when playing, it gets harder and harder to play one string only. I cannot use the pressure that I would like, as it would cause 2 strings to be played, or even 3 strings. I like to play strong, with enough pressure.

 

 

Does anyone perhaps have any suggestions about what I can do? I want to make a new bridge template, different from the one Ive been using, so any advice on this will be appreciated.

 

Also, what is the usual preference of classical players, regarding bridge shapes/curves/radius?

 

Thank you. :)

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Hi, sorry for making another bridge curve/shape topic, since there are already some out there, but instead of resurrecting an old topic, it might be better to make a new one.

 

So first let me start by saying I tried quite a few different bridge templates. Ive tried making my own template, using a 42mm radius, aswell as checking that to the 42mm radius playing surface. I downloaded a bridge template, but all seem to have the same problem. As I go up higher in positions when playing, it gets harder and harder to play one string only. I cannot use the pressure that I would like, as it would cause 2 strings to be played, or even 3 strings. I like to play strong, with enough pressure.

 

 

Does anyone perhaps have any suggestions about what I can do? I want to make a new bridge template, different from the one Ive been using, so any advice on this will be appreciated.

Also, what is the usual preference of classical players, regarding bridge shapes/curves/radius?

 

Thank you. :)

Check the radius of your fingerboard. If the fingerboard radius is flatter than the bridge radius you will have difficulty playing in the upper positions especially on the middle strings. You will have to press the strings farther down to reach the fingerboard and there will be less clearance of the adjacent strings at the bridge. Check the string heights too. Strings that are too high will create the same problem.

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Check the radius of your fingerboard. If the fingerboard radius is flatter than the bridge radius you will have difficulty playing in the upper positions especially on the middle strings. You will have to press the strings farther down to reach the fingerboard and there will be less clearance of the adjacent strings at the bridge. Check the string heights too. Strings that are too high will create the same problem.

 

Thank you I will check on that.

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Kallie,

How high is the action over all?  If you have the strings too high in general then the deflection needed to press down one string takes away too much of the difference from one string to the next.  That will be made worse the further up the fingerboard you go. I know some classical players like the action extra high, so there may have to be a trade off between "comfortable" action and string access.  To assist in that you may consider going to a higher tension string so that you can lower the action over all, still play hard and not buzz (what is the violin term here since I come from a guitar world? rub?) but also decrease the deflection required to play a note up high. 

 

If none of the "stock" radiuses you find are working for you, make your own.  What I mean is fit a bridge so that it is still too high.  Then cut each notch deeper slowly until you get the setup that works for you, then radius the bridge to match the notches.  Don't get stuck on the idea that it has to be a perfect radius.  That might not work for you or your particular instrument. 

 

As a last resort since this would make your setup less than ideal for lots of reasons, you could increase the string spacing across the bridge.  This puts the strings further around the curve thus increasing the difference from one string to the next.  The change could be a very small one to make enough difference to make it work.

 

All of the above assumes that the rest of the setup is "correct" (fingerboard radius, fingerboard relief) as Curious1 suggested.  Good luck.

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Kallie,

How high is the action over all?  If you have the strings too high in general then the deflection needed to press down one string takes away too much of the difference from one string to the next.  That will be made worse the further up the fingerboard you go. I know some classical players like the action extra high, so there may have to be a trade off between "comfortable" action and string access.  To assist in that you may consider going to a higher tension string so that you can lower the action over all, still play hard and not buzz (what is the violin term here since I come from a guitar world? rub?) but also decrease the deflection required to play a note up high. 

 

If none of the "stock" radiuses you find are working for you, make your own.  What I mean is fit a bridge so that it is still too high.  Then cut each notch deeper slowly until you get the setup that works for you, then radius the bridge to match the notches.  Don't get stuck on the idea that it has to be a perfect radius.  That might not work for you or your particular instrument. 

 

As a last resort since this would make your setup less than ideal for lots of reasons, you could increase the string spacing across the bridge.  This puts the strings further around the curve thus increasing the difference from one string to the next.  The change could be a very small one to make enough difference to make it work.

 

All of the above assumes that the rest of the setup is "correct" (fingerboard radius, fingerboard relief) as Curious1 suggested.  Good luck.

 

Thank you very much for the advice. Usually I prefer a low action, and most of the people who I sell violins to and who bring their violins to me for setup, prefers low action also. So I don't think the problem is having to press the strings down too much. I try to go as low as possible, without causing the strings to buzz.

 

I will try what you suggested, where I cut each notch deeper until I find the one that works for me. Might be the best approach. I would like to avoid having to space the strings further apart, as that might make double stopping even more difficult.

 

 

 

 

What is the general preference with classical players? Do they have a specific setup that they like? Maybe someone with more experience than me can tell me what you are generally asked to do regarding setup. :)

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