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Bow Identification


kittykatjaz
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Hi Everyone,

 

Would anyone be able to help me with identifying this bow stamp?

 

The bow came with what looks like a late 19th century German Strad copy that I picked up at a local swap meet today. Unfortunately the previous owner had it restored with a fresh coat of varnish on the belly and scroll.

 

What's left of the label appears to say "Antonius Stradivarius Deutiche Urbeit"

 

post-23276-0-53646600-1402817881_thumb.jpg

post-23276-0-78800100-1402817582_thumb.jpg

post-23276-0-08481600-1402817854_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks,

 

Jaz

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I'm usually pretty good at this game but I can't quite figure this one out.

 

I think your picture might be upside down, in the current perspective it looks like there is a period in the upper left of the stamp, which probably should be on the lower right for an abbreviation.

 

If I had it in my hands I would use a focused flashlight beam in the dark and aim it from all different sides to see what shadows might appear, also a pencil rub helps sometimes.

 

It looks like a pretty sloppy stamp but you never know (or at least I never know.)

 

Have fun!

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Thanks Guys,

 

The lighting thing is something I tried yesterday from all different angles. In the end I thought if I could photograph it and bring it into Photoshop then by playing with the levels and filtering, it would bring it out a bit better. I guess where I found it hard is if the name is not a native English one then guessing becomes a whole lot harder.

 

The stamp E. Liebich, Breslau. does fit if the bow is inverted.

 

So next question, who is E. Liebich, Breslau?

 

Regards,

 

Jaz

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... who is E. Liebich, Breslau?...

 

According to the Grunke book, three generations of Markneukirchen violin makers, all named Ernst Liebich, sold bows with this stamp that they procured from various bow making workshops in the Vogtland area during the time period of about 1870 to 1935.  

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According to the Grunke book, three generations of Markneukirchen violin makers, all named Ernst Liebich, sold bows with this stamp that they procured from various bow making workshops in the Vogtland area during the time period of about 1870 to 1935.  

I.e., the usual.  The frog confirms this.

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I.e., the usual.  The frog confirms this.

 

 

Concur.  The violin label says "Antonius Stradivarius Deutsche Arbeit", "German Work", meaning made in Germany.  This wording was used in Saxon export violins circa late 1880's and seems most common in examples from the UK.  There should be a date and most likely a distributor's logo somewhere on the label.  The bow looks like it's been recently rehaired.  Nice catch 

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What about the frog?

 

From what I can see of the frog, it is nickel-mounted and the wood is a rather low-grade porous ebony.

All consonant with low end German of the period.  I find the use of the "French" stamp orientation and position for a blatantly German stamp rather interesting.  Thanks for posting this, kittykatjaz  :) .

 

How does it all sound?

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Liebich were a dynasty of Silesian (not Markneukirchen) violin makers. The shop in Breslau was, according to Lütgendorff, who would have personally had correspondence with them (if not known them himself), founded by Johann Gottfried L. in 1790, and still in business when he published his encyclopedia in 1922. The youngest of the Liebichs was Ernst III, who was born in Breslau on the 25th May 1862, and who worked as a journeyman at the best addresses in Vienna (Bittner, Voigt) until he took over the family shop after the death of his father in 1884. He was “Hofinstrumentenmacher” to the Prince Coburg-Gotha, which will have also involved supplying masses of cheaper and cheapest Markneukirchen trade school bows, like yours.

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But that would be after 200 USD of work!

ROFL.  Nope.  That's ready to use at a large shop I frequent.  New [Chinese] is 60 or so, used the same to about 200, antique with markings 300 and up.  You clean one like the OP's up, the price goes up too.

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ROFL.  Nope.  That's ready to use at a large shop I frequent.  New [Chinese] is 60 or so, used the same to about 200, antique with markings 300 and up.  You clean one like the OP's up, the price goes up too.

Nope. That bow needs AT LEAST: a wrap, leather and rehair, and that doesn't even deal with the frog issues. We can't see the head, so we don't know about the head plate, and bows that show up looking like this are seldom straight.

 

I'm not saying that it isn't salvageable, but it certainly won't be profitable.

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Nope. That bow needs AT LEAST: a wrap, leather and rehair, and that doesn't even deal with the frog issues. We can't see the head, so we don't know about the head plate, and bows that show up looking like this are seldom straight.

 

I'm not saying that it isn't salvageable, but it certainly won't be profitable.

Not worth arguing over. :)   I was assuming from the photo it was recently rehaired, so you could bow with it.  That wrap's a fright.

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