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Rue

If you can't use hide glue - what glue is second-best?

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The neck ring (?) is loose on one of the cheap boxwood pegs on the inexpensive 'experimental' viola I recently purchased.

 

The pegs fit well...so I'm happy with them, but want to glue this bit in place - before it creates some 'mystery' rattle or buzz that I'll be fretting about, lol.

 

Regular white glue?  :ph34r:

 

Or would you even bother with hide glue on a peg in the first place?

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I think white glue is fine for that.  Or just about any other kind of glue.  But I would not use epoxy, because it's too hard to clean off any excess.

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Thanks.  :) I checked through all my glues (I had various kinds for various art projects)...and the kids have managed to dry them all out. :angry:

 

So I will start with a fresh bottle of white glue.

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Titebond, you can clean it up with water befrore it dries and it has some give when the wood expands and contracts.

 

Thanks! :)  I will do that when I change the strings...I ordered them last week...and had them shipped snail mail should (maybe) be here this coming week!

...and I think I'll just openly ignore Carl's advice...seems like overkill... :rolleyes:

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This is one place where white glue or yellow glue (Titebond) would actuallty be better than hide glue.  Hide glue becomes brittle when it dries and the peg collars could become loose.  White or yellow glue always remains a bit flexible and can absorb seasonal expansions and contractions, as MeyerFittings says.  The disadvantage of white or yellow glues -- their inability to resist steady tension -- does not matter here because there is no tension.

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 ...and I think I'll just openly ignore Carl's advice...seems like overkill... :rolleyes:

 

I guess it is. Unless of course, the peg has been oiled or varnished before and then none of the others will work. :)

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But then again;

 

OK, if the ring that is loose, slides forward onto the peg... then it can be slid forward, and a drop of superglue could be put where its going to sit, and when you move it back - you would want to revolve it a few turns. (and this, no matter what glue you use...)

 

Super glue will allow, I don't know, two or three turns, before it binds and becomes permanent. I always hit superglue jobs with the shop hot air blower for a minute or two. Any that squeezed out and is just sitting on the surface - well, problem gone.

 

With white or yellow glue, turn it a few cranks, (perhaps wash off any squeeze out, with warm H2O) and then, just put it aside until tonight, or better yet, tomorrow morning.

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 ...and I think I'll just openly ignore Carl's advice...seems like overkill... :rolleyes:

I've used the superglue designated as "flexible" for gluing loose peg rings for many years now. The regular brittle stuff didn't work so well.

That said, I won't claim to know nearly as much about this as Eric Meyer,

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LinkMan do you work for them?

 

Rue I am with the superglue group. These rings have usually already been glued and they tend to get a lot of sweat and grease. Yu do need to be carful but I would use the thick flexible kind. Don't use it straight from the tube. I always use a tooth pick to apply it. And there are solvents for it if that really becomes necessary. On pegs collars this should be OK, but it is not for general repair work. Having said that, at Hills it's value for repairing ebony, led the bow makers to call it 'the bow makers friend'.

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...[superglue's] value for repairing ebony, led the bow makers to call it 'the bow makers friend'.

 

I call it bow makers' holy water.  I have performed many resurrections with it.

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Whoa! Go to a friend's house for dinner - and come home to all this wonderful reading! :)
 

Take advice from someone who has repaired or made a few instruments.


I thought I had! :mellow:

Okay! Superflexible superglue (which I have to buy regardless) - if the yellow/white Titebond doesn't work, or if the peg is noticeably oily? Or just don't bother with the Titebond and go straight to the superglue! Got it.

I need to visit the hardware store...I also need ant powder (apparently the ants at my daughter's house are winning the invasion and she's declared a state of emergency and has called in the troops [er...that would be me] <_<...and will pick up glues at the same time.

Good thing I asked. It was more complicated than anticipated. :D

Thanks everyone!
 

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Good thing I asked. It was more complicated than anticipated. :D

Thanks everyone!

 

 

Hey, we could go on for a while still...?

I'm not sure we have covered every aspect of the subject yet.

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You would think that the choice of "what glue-where" would be the the time honored cornerstone of luthiers everywhere, but you have scratched the underbelly of schisms in the trade. I've been gluing pieces of sundry **** together for forty years and I still agonize over it. I had to glue up a shovel handle that split over the weekend and the pros and cons flew round my brain for way too long.   

When superglue hit the scene back in the seventies it seemed like black magic. No oen really trusted it. The bow makers were the first to truly embrace it since it sucked into tiny spaces without a feeler gauge to work it in, and you didn't even have to clamp it. As everybody knows, they are a bunch of lazy blokes, prone to drink, anyway ;)  (probably why I call so many of them friends).. Over the ensuing decades the ranks of the supergluers has risen along with the technology such that there is a glue type for everyman (or woman). I didn't even know that there was a flexible superglue, I guess that I need to get out and about more, and smell the resin. Just remember, "he who lives by the adhesive ----"

It all really depends on what glue you are trying to replace and how shitty the fit of what came loose in the first place. If you are just filling in a crummy fit it's mostly a crap shoot anyway. I've been using the Titebond 111 for many years to glue on the collars. I would think that if they were failing that I would have heard about it from irate customers, but perhaps that's why there are wanted posters out with my face on them in Boston. I thought it was that old speeding ticket. I fit the collars on with a taper that is identical to the peg and ream them till they fit snugly up against the lip before I glue them. Titebond works for me. I can clean up the squeeze out with a tiny brush and water and it takes about an hour to dry enough to turn the shape of the collar on the lathe, If the joint was sloppy the collar wood would just spin aound when it hit the cutter so I have a built in quality control.

Hell Roger, the Hill mechanics used to split the collars and glue them in to a cut - out channel, Aparently, according to Bill Watson, they used something called Forthill Cement, but that may have been before your time there-- back "when Dinosaurs roamed the earth" kidding,kidding. More like "days of old when knights were bold" and superglue wan't invented. The just stuck their *** with clay and spit, and walked away contented.

 

Glue bottles at ten paces anyone? :angry:

 

Since most housing these days is built with glue and wood chips, I guess that we, out here, will find out what's what, when ther next volcano blows and the ground shakes.

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Nice post Mr. Meyer Sir! And yes I do remember the split collar and groove system. I might still have one or two partially finished pegs, but I gave so many away. (They were thrown out after the Hanwell fire) I am having a big clean out soon and I will keep my Eyes open. I owe you still. Never mind the glue bottles at ten paces. I prefer kisses at close range. I especially love licking the back of someone’s neck 

from the inside. R.

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I especially love licking the back of someone’s neck from the inside. R.

 

Now THAT would be an interesting superglue dilemma.

 

"we are the people that out Parents warned us about"

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...okay...I'm putting my Chemistry book back, and pulling out an altogether different reference book...

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...btw...glued the peg ring back in place using yellow wood glue...so far, so good.

Thanks everyone! All advice has been stored in the appropriate mental box...hopefully down the road my retrieval facilities will remain intact...

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