Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Tools That Don't Work So Well And Tools That Do


Berl Mendenhall
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 126
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I have better pics of my not-yet-patent-applied-for sharpening jig for plane blades. This thing is simple, inexpensive and it really works. Sharpens straight-edged or curved blades. I use it on the mylar backed abrasive film which is on glass. The nylon screw won't scratch the glass. 5 micron silicon carbide gives me a pretty good edge.

 

pic 1

 

 

pic 2

 

Since I don't remember receiving any comments on the previous post, I will make it easy for you. Just choose a letter:

 

A.  Thanks for posting. But I already have a jig that I like.

 

B.  I don't like jigs. I just use my hands to feel the blade angle.

 

C.  I don't use planes. I like a belt sander.

 

D. Why are you bothering us with this stuff? 

 

E.  You still use planes?

 

F.  I gave up violin making. Too frustrating.

 

G.  I am in a nursing home and don't have access to sharp tools.

 

H. I don't use tools. I just text my friends and enemies all day and night. I am a teenager.

 

I. What's a plane?  You mean airplane?  Why do you need a jig for that?

 

J. How do I get off of Maestronet. My browser is stuck here.

 

K. Wha't a micron? What's silicon carbide? You think you are pretty smart, don't you, using words like that?

 

L. Be honest, the only reason you are making up such a long post is because your TV is broke.

 

M. Why do you want to know? Does Martin Schleske use a jig?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have better pics of my not-yet-patent-applied-for sharpening jig for plane blades. This thing is simple, inexpensive and it really works. Sharpens straight-edged or curved blades. I use it on the mylar backed abrasive film which is on glass. The nylon screw won't scratch the glass. 5 micron silicon carbide gives me a pretty good edge.

 

pic 1

 

 

pic 2

 

Since I don't remember receiving any comments on the previous post, I will make it easy for you. Just choose a letter:

 

A.  Thanks for posting. But I already have a jig that I like.

 

B.  I don't like jigs. I just use my hands to feel the blade angle.

 

C.  I don't use planes. I like a belt sander.

 

D. Why are you bothering us with this stuff? 

 

E.  You still use planes?

 

F.  I gave up violin making. Too frustrating.

 

G.  I am in a nursing home and don't have access to sharp tools.

 

H. I don't use tools. I just text my friends and enemies all day and night. I am a teenager.

 

I. What's a plane?  You mean airplane?  Why do you need a jig for that?

 

J. How do I get off of Maestronet. My browser is stuck here.

 

K. Wha't a micron? What's silicon carbide? You think you are pretty smart, don't you, using words like that?

 

L. Be honest, the only reason you are making up such a long post is because your TV is broke.

 

M. Why do you want to know? Does Martin Schleske use a jig?

Keep posting John, I like jigs.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before I bought the hand cut rasps I used machine cut rasps and rasps and files made out of 3/8" plywood with sandpaper glued to them. Actually the sandpaper thing worked pretty well. Just didn't last very long. I do like using the hand cut ones though. By far better than machine cut or sandpaper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi everyone,

 

Best recent tool for me, and one of the most usefull ones, the routing mat from lee valley. The tip comes from a fellow (and very talented) maker.

The plates just stick to it so well that you don't need clamps anymore...

 

Paul

Just got a couple.

Wow. These are great. (Aside from the latex stink.)

I can see a lot of uses, once cut into the right shapes.

Scraping the arching just got a lot easier as I can move the piece anyway I want without fussing with a cradle or clamp.

Thanks for the suggestion!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Old-ish thread, but not worth starting a new one, and it fits here.

 

I just got a LED sewing machine light, 3W (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00WOV23JO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

 

The original light on my drillpress was located behind the spindle, which made certain that whatever you were drilling into was in the shadow of the spindle.  Not good.  The goosneck light can be positioned anywhere, and has a magnetic base.  Perfect.  I might get some more for my other machines.

 

post-25192-0-08201400-1475509712_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For American, a lot of the 1920’s brands seem good to me... and you can find them at garage sales.  You know, the Everkeen, Buck Bros. types.  The old CAST STEEL stuff is almost always good, in my experience.  Cast steel is a way of adding carbon to steel, and has nothing to do with how the tools were made.  Cast steel was made from low carbon iron (wrought iron).  German steel was made from high carbon iron (cast iron), and the excess carbon was burnt off.

I would like to revise this list... Keen Kutter made good tools.  Everkeen, I've had a few duds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

What are your opinion on scrapper thickness? I saw on here the love given to a 0.2mm scrapper with all 4 corners rounded differently. I went looking and most (all?) of the scrappers I could find are 0.7mm to 0.5mm. I assume 0.2mm is more flexible? Do most of you make your own scrappers or do you buy them?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What are your opinion on scrapper thickness? I saw on here the love given to a 0.2mm scrapper with all 4 corners rounded differently. I went looking and most (all?) of the scrappers I could find are 0.7mm to 0.5mm. I assume 0.2mm is more flexible? Do most of you make your own scrappers or do you buy them?

 

I don't have an opinion because I don't make violins but I suggest you read Michael Darnton's book chapters at violinmag.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What are your opinion on scrapper thickness? I saw on here the love given to a 0.2mm scrapper with all 4 corners rounded differently. I went looking and most (all?) of the scrappers I could find are 0.7mm to 0.5mm. I assume 0.2mm is more flexible? Do most of you make your own scrappers or do you buy them?

 

Hi Frank - go buy and old set of feeler gauges. Learn to sharpen the edge and experiment until you find which thickness suits you best.

 

cheers edi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My vote for least useful tool is a "bridge-shaping tool" that clamps the bridge in a holder, then the system is pushed back and forth on a piece of sandpaper placed on the spruce arch.  I had great hopes for it as a panacea for the difficult process of cutting a bridge.  Perhaps I didn't use it correctly, but time and again I ended up going with the chisel and knife method, which I have stuck to ever since.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think David Burgess was lampooning that device when he made his famous (infamous?) Sawzall video.

And since it came up, I might point out Mr. Burgess, that a real Sawzall is made by the Milwaukee Electric Tool Co., and for maximum manliness it should be one of the vintage "Made in USA" models. A Chinese Dewalt like you're using hardly makes the cut. Please!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is a turning gouge effectively the same as a carving gouge? I think I am going to start with two gouges and a few planes and rasps. This one looks good and has positive reviews - I would love/appreciate the opinion of those of you who know - since I know nothing :)

 

I am trying to put together the minimum set of tools required (as I go along not all at once) to make a violin and keeping in mind that I will probably be switching to cello, and so will need larger/different tools then. This Is what I am thinking of for my "large" gouge, and it will be one of the first tools I need to practice my carving out the plates arches on my practice boards - starting in a day or two. 

https://www.amazon.com/Robert-Sorby-843GH-Roughing-Gouge/dp/B004HZN7OA/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1477322319&sr=8-12&keywords=sorby+wood+gouge
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is a turning gouge effectively the same as a carving gouge? I think I am going to start with two gouges and a few planes and rasps. This one looks good and has positive reviews - I would love/appreciate the opinion of those of you who know - since I know nothing :)

 

I am trying to put together the minimum set of tools required (as I go along not all at once) to make a violin and keeping in mind that I will probably be switching to cello, and so will need larger/different tools then. This Is what I am thinking of for my "large" gouge, and it will be one of the first tools I need to practice my carving out the plates arches on my practice boards - starting in a day or two. 

https://www.amazon.com/Robert-Sorby-843GH-Roughing-Gouge/dp/B004HZN7OA/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1477322319&sr=8-12&keywords=sorby+wood+gouge

(Or should I just get a set of 6 gouges for $15 until I know what I am doing?)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...