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Beautiful old tools


Berl Mendenhall

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  • 1 month later...

Here's my "new" old saw.  I picked it up this weekend for $10.  If my reading is correct from http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/ this is a no. 8 or no. 9 Henry Disston (pre-sons) from the late 1850's - 1865.  It stays straight even after flexing it into a "U" in either direction.  I had to test it, but I don't plan on doing that again.  The handle is solid, but is cracked at the medallion.  One of the split nuts barely has two notches.  So I'm thinking I should probably leave the handle alone instead possibly making things worse.  It currently has 5 tpi but the toe is badly worn and there is a broken tooth so I will probably cut new teeth.  Any of you hand saw users have any opinions on tpi or even a graduated tpi with a higher tpi at the toe?  I think I remember Rodger saying he did that with his saw.  Anyway, enjoy the pics.

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@ 150 years old, tools like that become venerable...

But I don't belong to the tool collector crowd--I've always bought tools to use (even if I never get around to using them).

So, best of both worlds would be to make it useable but keep the same TPI.

That's my 2¢.

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@ 150 years old, tools like that become venerable...

But I don't belong to the tool collector crowd--I've always bought tools to use (even if I never get around to using them).

So, best of both worlds would be to make it useable but keep the same TPI.

That's my 2¢.

You might be right, and you're certainly not alone in that opinion.  I'm still straddling the fence.  If the spring steel had lost it's spring I would restore it and turn it into a wall hanger.  Because the steel is still good, I'm going to extend it's working life.  Although it will be more like a semi-retired pampered working life while I'm it's caretaker.

 

Cheers,

Jim 

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Here's my "new" old saw.  I picked it up this weekend for $10.  If my reading is correct from http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/ this is a no. 8 or no. 9 Henry Disston (pre-sons) from the late 1850's - 1865.  It stays straight even after flexing it into a "U" in either direction.  I had to test it, but I don't plan on doing that again.  The handle is solid, but is cracked at the medallion.  One of the split nuts barely has two notches.  So I'm thinking I should probably leave the handle alone instead possibly making things worse.  It currently has 5 tpi but the toe is badly worn and there is a broken tooth so I will probably cut new teeth.  Any of you hand saw users have any opinions on tpi or even a graduated tpi with a higher tpi at the toe?  I think I remember Rodger saying he did that with his saw.  Anyway, enjoy the pics.

I have a Lynx rip saw with I think 6 tpi. I have very little set on it, and I have filed a second angle on the back of every tooth, to make the cutting edge a bit less pointed, and stronger. It works very well like this for maple - it cuts very quickly, leaving a very fine kerf and a clean finish. I'll take a picture tomorrow. I have a Disston too with an ordinary tooth, but it doesn't work quite so well.

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I have a Lynx rip saw with I think 6 tpi. I have very little set on it, and I have filed a second angle on the back of every tooth, to make the cutting edge a bit less pointed, and stronger. It works very well like this for maple - it cuts very quickly, leaving a very fine kerf and a clean finish. I'll take a picture tomorrow. I have a Disston too with an ordinary tooth, but it doesn't work quite so well.

Thanks Conor, I appreciate it.

 

-Jim

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Here are the Lynx and the Disston. Sorry about the quality of the picture of the Lynx, but you can see the idea.

 

I found this saw in a damp shed, badly rusted. I decided to try to clean it up, and found that the best way to clean off the plate was with a cabinet scraper, followed by oil and steel wool. Now it's my favorite.

 

I left my mechanics tool box out in the rain recently, and found a mass of rust when I opened it up. I bought a bottle of rust remover in the hardware shop. You dilute it with 9 parts water and leave the rusted tools to soak. Then you just wash off the scum that forms, pretty much down to clean metal. It's fantastic. I'm told that plain molasses  is every bit as good. I wonder is that the active ingredient in coke? If i'd known about it, I'd probably have used it on the saw.

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 I'm told that plain molasses  is every bit as good. I wonder is that the active ingredient in coke? If i'd known about it, I'd probably have used it on the saw.

I never heard of the molasses trick , should make for a sweet tool ,  :P I have used white vinegar and tomato juice or sauce for a cleaner, both mild , it's important to give a neutralizing bath of baking soda to  stop further action of the acids.

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I decided to try to clean it up, and found that the best way to clean off the plate was with a cabinet scraper, followed by oil and steel wool. Now it's my favorite.

 

I left my mechanics tool box out in the rain recently, and found a mass of rust when I opened it up. I bought a bottle of rust remover in the hardware shop. You dilute it with 9 parts water and leave the rusted tools to soak. Then you just wash off the scum that forms, pretty much down to clean metal. It's fantastic. I'm told that plain molasses  is every bit as good. I wonder is that the active ingredient in coke? If i'd known about it, I'd probably have used it on the saw.

That's pretty much what I did with rust remover instead of oil.  I didn't let it soak (as per instructions) becasuse it was an acid based rust remover and I didn't want to cause any etching.  It already has plenty of pitting.  My plan was to set up an electrolysis bath to remove the rust but I couldn't do that with out removing the handle.  Thanks for the pics.

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I left my mechanics tool box out in the rain recently, and found a mass of rust when I opened it up. I bought a bottle of rust remover in the hardware shop. You dilute it with 9 parts water and leave the rusted tools to soak. Then you just wash off the scum that forms, pretty much down to clean metal. It's fantastic. I'm told that plain molasses  is every bit as good. I wonder is that the active ingredient in coke? If i'd known about it, I'd probably have used it on the saw.

The active ingredient in rust remover is orthophosphoric acid, the same thing you can find in Coca Cola and yes - you can remove the rust using Coca Cola, but old formulation - I am not sure that the new kinds (i.e. Diet Cola) contains this acid.

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  • 5 years later...

Dusting off one of my favorite old threads. There has been a bunch of old tool threads. This is just the first one I found. It reminded me that I haven’t heard from Berl in a while. I hope he’s well. 

Anyway, I just finished restoring an old Atlas compound table. It has X, Y, and swivel adjustments. I’ll attach it to my drill press and see if it’s mostly helpful or mostly in the way. And no, I will not use it for milling. The retired machinist in me won’t allow for that kind of drill press abuse. 

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