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Under "Lower Block Fix" you should add clamping counterparts.  You make these yourself from wood (Basswood is good.) lined with cardboard and waxed paper.  One goes on the outside of the ribs at the block, one goes on the outside of the back at the block and one goes on the curved surface of the block opposite the ribs.  The last does not need to be lined.

 

Under "Replacing the Fingerboard," if you want to hollow out the underside of the fingerboard projection you will probably need a gouge, a small round-soled arching plane and a curved scraper.

Thank you, I've added these to the list. What tools will I need to fashion the clamping counterparts out of Basswood? A saw? Sandpaper?

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Ha ! that's cute ...scared straight .....reality check!

  lists are the way to go, they help define problems and solutions ,especially when planning a trip to a foreign land. after time the list will mostly be in your head , but it still won't hurt to have one.

  I suggest a cook thermometer for glue , handy around the kitchen.  Mostly these days I just use a small jar , like for jelly in a sauce pan half full of water ...on the stove top on low ,have all your things ready to go, test clamp twice or three times ,whatever to have a smooth feel, I will practice a move until I feel it flowing and graceful,  , get in a warm space , say a few hail marys and go.

 To build your understanding and confidence with the glue, just do some test gluing first,  little slips of wood , or what nots to get a feel for the stuff. 

Thank you for these tips! I have a candy/oil digital cooking thermometer. But it's used for cooking, can I use it for the hide glue then cleanit off to be used in food again? Glass Jar is free. I'll add these to the list.

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And a couple of pics showing the lining issues, much of the cardboard flaps are separated from the edges. Does anyone know the original purpose for the strip of cloth pictured on the inside top of the case? Is the case missing any of it original features altogether that I should consider adding? Or helpful features that are not original that I should consider adding?

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The soundpost isn't going to be a big deal. If you cut and set fullsize soundposts day in day out, a part size instrument seems onerous, but that's just to do with tasks that become second nature ...

For a small soundpost, the best tool is a bent piece of coat-hanger with a point filed onto the end of it!

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I think that strip of material is the ribbon that held the top of the case to the bottom of the case? (When it's open).

 Good call Rue, that would explain the nail sticking out of the case in the bottom part. either original or a questionable repair but I agree with your assessment. Thanks. I'll probably replace that piece to match the new lining. Do you agree with replacing the lining at the very least? It might "devalue" the all-original quality of the case, but what is this thing worth to begin with? I really like the work in the link Franciscus provided and would love to do a similar job with a material of my choosing.

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The soundpost isn't going to be a big deal. If you cut and set fullsize soundposts day in day out, a part size instrument seems onerous, but that's just to do with tasks that become second nature ...

For a small soundpost, the best tool is a bent piece of coat-hanger with a point filed onto the end of it!

Thanks Martin! I've added your suggestion to the list and it's free so even better!

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I don't get it, why you all here are discussing soundposts, peg-sharpening or bridge-fitting, when it isn't clear at all actually, if the Garini will ever get into a state, where such things are needed.... -_-

I would propose and advice, to plan step by step, just look at your feet and not at a point 100 miles away.

 

And to keep the track: Repairing the case is a quite different topic and is supposed to be discussed in a different thread, isn't it?

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I don't think every 'old' item that comes our way needs to be conserved.  If this case has no intrinsic value...even if it were in perfect shape...then have your way with it.  Is it cute enough on it's own to be kept as a case - not as violin case per se (but just as a box?)?  Then refinish it as you'd like...and let your daughter keep it as a jewellery box (or whatever)...or you keep it for yourself...

 

I have an antique glove box.  I don't keep gloves in it.  I have a new leather cartridge case that I think is beautiful...I don't use it for ammo...

 

It's fine to 'repurpose' if you want to.  It won't ruin it for its original purpose either...

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The top is off! The knife I posted worked very well, I just covered the sharp serrated edge with a napkin and gripped it at the end and worked very slowly and carefully. There was one part on the lower left rib that was a little harder to work with as I suspect, as can be seen in the pics, a different glue was used. The paring knife was helpful to stick the point gently into an area if I needed a little extra help. Next step - acquiring some hide glue and some wood to repair the busted part surrounding the button hole? I am going to do this project so committing the first step is a good feeling.

 

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Congratulations!

I was afraid, that you might hurt yourself :( or the top, but the old glue seems to be got tired and surrendered easily.

Before adding something or glueing you should:

- check if there are small cracks around the saddle, corners, neck area or somewhere else at the table

- clean it and remove old glue by watering, also the ribs and bottom.

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Thanks! How do I clean it, with a dry paintbrush? A toothbrush? And to remove the extra glue are you recommending gently rubbing with a warm damp cloth?

Thanks! How do I clean it, with a dry paintbrush? A toothbrush? And to remove the extra glue are you recommending gently rubbing with a warm damp cloth?

And Jeffrey said the thread seems fine with the combined discussions of the case, bow, and violin repairs.

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Thanks! How do I clean it, with a dry paintbrush? A toothbrush? And to remove the extra glue are you recommending gently rubbing with a warm damp cloth?

And Jeffrey said the thread seems fine with the combined discussions of the case, bow, and violin repairs.

Jeffrey wants to save room here for other topics, that's right! :D

Clean the inside of the box careful with a dry cloth (not too warm or hot, and don't damage the valuable label), the old glue can be soaked by putting a piece of wet cloth on it for about one hour, remove the soaked glue with a knife (carefully!), and repeat the procedere untill it's all clean.

The old block can be put into a water cup to soak dirt and glue.

And check the table for small hidden cracks, before they might get bigger!

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Excellent, my little girl's nap is extra long this morning so I cleaned the inside of the violin as best I could and have set some wet paper towels to soak on the areas that show the most obvious leftover glue. I've also submerged the lower block in water held down with a bottle opening tool to prevent it from floating. Thank you again for your continued help.

 

 

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The glue came off very easily after the soak, it reminded me of rubber cement. The block was still a little dirty but I think that dirt is deep into the holes/splits and it won't be seen anyway. I await my next instructions from Professor Black Face or whoever wants to step in and help me along. There are a couple of little glue spots that I missed and will repeat this procedure on. One thing I noticed was how soft the wood was under the wet paper towel so I was extra careful not to damage anything. And I also noticed and tried to clean a little "positioning hole" that was where the lower block was once glued.

 

 

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I peeled away the top layer of old material from the case, with it went three sections of wood that were loose and being held in place only by the cloth so those will be glued back together. Should I use regular wood glue for that job or hide glue?

 

I am starting to prepare the items I'll need moving forward, is there one online store that has good prices that I should buy a lot of the stuff from? I've found what looks like a decent deal on some hide glue, is this a decent deal? I want to buy from someone shipping from the USA. Is it safe to assume the quality of hide glue is sufficient?

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Quality-Luthier-Hide-Glue-for-Violin-Maker-1-2-Lbs-/270842985428

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I peeled away the top layer of old material from the case, with it went three sections of wood that were loose and being held in place only by the cloth so those will be glued back together. Should I use regular wood glue for that job or hide glue?

 

I am starting to prepare the items I'll need moving forward, is there one online store that has good prices that I should but a lot of the stuff from? I've found what looks like a decent deal on some hide glue, is this a decent deal? I want to buy from someone shipping from the USA. Is it safe to assume the quality of hide glue is sufficient?

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Quality-Luthier-Hide-Glue-for-Violin-Maker-1-2-Lbs-/270842985428

For anything i need in the context of violin's repair, I always check what International Violin Company has to offer, even I have to pay the shipping of minimum US$26 to Bosnia. I.e. glue: https://www.internationalviolin.com/item_detail.aspx?ItemCode=10222. Beside that, Ken Wise (kwise@internationalviolin.com - the owner, I think) is very (mean VERY) nice guy, very willing to communicate and answer any kind of question - he knows everything about the things that I.V.C. sells. I, frankly, do not know whether the better online shop exists on Earth.

 

Edit: If it's possible to ensure the tight fit between the case's parts,  I'd use the hide glue - if not, the epoxy is better solution. 

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This looks fine now!

The next step would be to reinstall the block. It should fit the ribs and the back without bigger gaps, or you have to make it fitting with a knife, a rasp or a plane.

You need some small clamps and a piece of wood (or similar stuff), which follows the slightly swung outline of the ribs as a form.

And you could wonder now about removing the fingerboard.

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...The next step would be to reinstall the block....

 

Before reinstalling the block, you should check to see if the ribs need shortening.  See if there is adequate back edge overhang all around the lower ribs.  Hold the top in place on the ribs (without glue) and check the top edge overhang.  If the ribs are bulging out of if there is inadequate edge overhang, you may want to shorten the ribs.

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Before reinstalling the block, you should check to see if the ribs need shortening.  See if there is adequate back edge overhang all around the lower ribs.  Hold the top in place on the ribs (without glue) and check the top edge overhang.  If the ribs are bulging out of if there is inadequate edge overhang, you may want to shorten the ribs.

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Looking at this picture, I'd say that the ribs do not require shortening, but careful cleaning of seem between ribs and back is really necessary.

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The ribs fit together nicely but the back is bent ever so slightly away from the ribs as seen in the photo franciscus linked to due to years of pressure applied by the loose lower block pushing it downwards when the broken violin was strung up. So when I touch the ribs together and then push the back seam closed, the ribs separate a little at the bottom since they are weaker than the back. Does that make sense? Can this all be corrected by firmly clamping everything in place when I glue the lower block in?

How do I clamp the back seam closed and bring/force it back into place? Do I add a price of wood on top of the block? Surely the ribs can't handle this type of cross-axis pressure.

The lower block does not fit nicely at all I sort if wonder how it was ever in place. I will have to shave it down slightly here and there. Also part if the inner lower rib where the lower block used to be glued to is gone, the wood is half the thickness in a vertical strip. Do I need to fashion a filler piece for that? Is this lower block reuseable? It is clear after opening the violin that not much care was given to the instrument when made.

How do I remove the fingerboard? I fear it was attached with a much heavier glue and there is what appears to be a nail attaching it to the neck.

For the lower block fix I still need to buy glue, clamps, xacto knife, spare wood (maybe I can get some for free from furniture discarded on the street). Am I missing anything? Thanks so much for all of your help!

 

You can see the missing wood in the ribs where the button hole below:

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Now it's getting a bit more complicated; I'm assuming, the wood used for the back was too fresh, it dried out more from the unsealed inside back than from the outside and was deformed. Usually, at bigger and "better" violins you should remove the lower ribs and built a form to put it back into the right place. But here you could try to soak the inside back at the lower 5cm with a wet cloth overnight, it will make the inside extent, so that it probably will get straight again (or nearly straight); to keep it right, you can clamp it with a thin log laid over the upside of the ribs, the underside of the clamp at the place of the block (covered with cloth or similar to protect the varnish, or you could use another very short and narrow log as a "form") untill it's dry again, but not too much pressure!

To glue the ribs right again at the block you will need an outside form, like I described above, it will get the small crack in the rib in the right position, too.

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How would you best clean out the dirt? I imagine it needs to be carefully cleaned away so as not to interfere with the new glue and adhesion...just a toothbrush and a vacuum cleaner?

This is the same job as the already finished cleaning of other surfaces previously glued.

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