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Addie

Bush and Graft, or Graft and Bush?

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I've always bushed the holes first, then fit the graft. If the peg holes don't actually need bushing it's not strictly necessary for a neck graft, though it is usually done.

If the graft is done well there is probably no need for the extra reinforcing that doing the bushings after would provide. (The pegs themselves might add something as well.) Some people think that the "Enlgish style' graft with square ends is a little stronger because it has more mechanical advantage. The question then becomes how strong is strong enough?

Michael

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I find it more practical to graft then bush (should it be neccesary). I see three advantages, firstly one has more vantage points to visualy check that the graft is fitting, and secondly a wafer thin end grain bush is apt to disintergrate. Also it doesn’t make life any easier having to cut a wood surface flat, when part of it is end grain and the other part not.

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The normal graft does not extend as far as the two upper holes (violin D and A), so it can't possibly make a difference there.

 

For the lower two holes (violin G and E), I think it makes sense to bush first.  The peg holes are discontinuities in the peg box walls which makes them weak spots.  If the bushing is done first, the grafting process will cut away these weak spots and replace them with solid wood for part of the wall thickness.  The new peg holes will probably be smaller than the old ones, and they might be in somewhat different locations.  Bushing first means that the weak spots caused by the old bushed holes only go partway through the walls.

 

Bushing first is recommended in the Weisshaar book.

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Not just Burgess.   :)

 

Of course, I would quote from my copy, but one of my polo ponies ate the cover off, so I’m having my restoration book restored... at the British Museum.   :P

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Not just Burgess.   :)

 

Of course, I would quote from my copy, but one of my polo ponies ate the cover off, so I’m having my restoration book restored... at the British Museum.   :P

Thought they only did antique historically important stuff..........OH, your copy of Petherick, gotcha.  Never mind :lol:

 

All joking aside, horses do seem to have a taste for rag paper, and some perverse instinct for picking the oldest, most expensive book in a pile.  With the number of both bibliophiles and horse owners here, a word to the wise......

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Weisshaar?............ that is where this Burgess fellow learnt to do everything arse over tit, isn’t it?

:lol:B)

 

We're in the Northern Hemisphere though. It's Australia where everything is upside down. ;)

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I know I shouldn’t let the polo ponies into the shop when I have a Bros. Amati open on the bench, but they are so curious!  Except, I can’t stand the look they give me when they smell hide glue.  

 

Oh, Jeeves!  Antonia left a deposit in the workshop.  Would you, please... ?  Thank you.  

 

I played polo upside down, once.  Girth wasn’t tight enough.  ‘Nuff said.

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I find it more practical to graft then bush (should it be neccesary). I see three advantages, firstly one has more vantage points to visualy check that the graft is fitting, and secondly a wafer thin end grain bush is apt to disintergrate. Also it doesn’t make life any easier having to cut a wood surface flat, when part of it is end grain and the other part not.

 

I am just dealing with the thin bushing problem mentioned presently.

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It seems to me the the Weisshaar method is all about the stability of the peg box, but there are clearly other considerations.

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It seems to me the the Weisshaar method is all about the stability of the peg box, but there are clearly other considerations.

The wafer thin end-grain bush (for instance in the G peg hole) adds absolutely NO stability to the peg box wall or any peg box cracks whatsoever. In fact, if anything it is more suitable to wedge peg box wall cracks apart, quite apart from it's propensity too crumble to bits or drop out. Should one need some additional stability for the peg box wall, glueing a piece of paper on the outside can be a useful trick. In low class workshops (Ahem :)) even sticking some Gaffer Tape on the outside of the peg box wall can be worthy of consideration.

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In low class workshops (Ahem :)) even sticking some Gaffer Tape on the outside of the peg box wall can be worthy of consideration.

 

You’ve been spying on my shop again!  furious-smiley.gif?1292867601

 

Addie’s Rare and Fine Violins ( copyright-smiley.gif?1292867575 ) has filed an international trade protest.  

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