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Two Tecchlers

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I notice two David Tecchler's up for auction at tarisio.com and amati.com respectively this month.

Condition and 'composition' accounting for the discrepancy in asking price?

All the same an interesting comparison.

The one on the left seems to suggest more of the Stainer influence in model. 

post-86-0-87015700-1394946452_thumb.jpg

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If you were hoping or expecting to get anyone else involved in a discussion on comparing the two fiddles, you will have to do a lot more than just post two out of focus pictures of the respective backs. The only pertinent question I could pose would be, why does one have “positioning pins” at the top and bottom of the back, whereas the other one seems not too?

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Let me add put the information from the two site together.

Let's call the one with positioning pin, violin A; the other one called the violin T.

First, there is a huge starting price and estimated price difference...

Violin A claim to be built around 1730s

Violin T claim to be built in 1732

Violin A come with a receipt and correspondence relating to the violin’s sale from J. & A. Beare, London

Violin T with a Certificate from Dario D'Attili, Miami, FL, in Dec 21, 1974 and a "Proforma" Certificate from Kenneth Warren & Son, Chicago, IL

Violin T have a dendrochronology report by Peter Ratcliff, London

"Dates the youngest rings of the treble and bass sides as 1715 and 1708 respectively. Written report available for purchase upon request."

Both violin have damage here and there.

Some I considered as the major one are:

Violin A has a soundpost crack

Violin T has done heavy repair on the treble rib

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There are two important points lowering the estimation of the T Tecchler:

"The head later, attributed to Turin. The top re-edged and re-purfled".

The position dots are much smaller as at the A, but existing.

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If you were hoping or expecting to get anyone else involved in a discussion on comparing the two fiddles, you will have to do a lot more than just post two out of focus pictures of the respective backs. 

Whoooo...... just pointing out an opportunity.

Ok, so I didn't give the actual URL for each (thanks, Terrini).

I presume people looking here either get the same promos from the respective auction sites I do, or check them regularly anyway.

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Declaring an interest - I work for Amati, but Tecchler A (the one on Amati) is in incredibly good condition indeed. It was exhibited in the Tecchler exhibition in Paris in the 70s and was described by Charles Beare as the second best Tecchler violin in the world. It is incredibly pure.

 

As an aside, Peter Ratcliffe found a 'ridiculously high' correlation between the front of this Tecchler and a 1737 del Gesu. It's funny how the wood seems to travel.

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Declaring an interest - I work for Amati, but Tecchler A (the one on Amati) is in incredibly good condition indeed. It was exhibited in the Tecchler exhibition in Paris in the 70s and was described by Charles Beare as the second best Tecchler violin in the world. It is incredibly pure.

 

As an aside, Peter Ratcliffe found a 'ridiculously high' correlation between the front of this Tecchler and a 1737 del Gesu. It's funny how the wood seems to travel.

Interesting 'inside' information. Are there many Tecchlers in circulation?

Since you mention it, where is the 'best Tecchler in the world'?

The only one I can remember seeing was in the Museo Strumenti Musicale in Rome many years back.

http://www.museostrumentimusicali.it/strumento1.asp?id=867

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FYI, Tecchler was one of the greatest cello builders, no question.  I don't know where the "best" one resides, but I've only seen one cello in my life, and that was back in the 70's.  I guess people who own them cherish and hang onto them.

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