Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Roger's edge method


Berl Mendenhall
 Share

Recommended Posts

I had been reading Roger's chapters in the DG book and I thought I'd try his method for edge work.  I found it easier (much easier) to do nice clean edges.  I have a few pictures of the process.  I apologies for the fuzziness of the first I wanted to show the channel.  I used a vaining gouge to cut the purfling to depth and then did each side.  I also found the small brass tool very useful for doing the inside part that blends with the arch.  In my opinion it's not much good for anything else.   The outside part of the scoop I did with gouges and scraper.  I have yet to roll the edges over to the final edge thickness.  I want to wait till I've finished scraping and finishing the arch.  I've got two fiddles started and I used this method on both backs.  So far I'm a convert      

post-6653-0-84924500-1394393830_thumb.jpg

post-6653-0-94688500-1394393864_thumb.jpg

post-6653-0-09493900-1394393932_thumb.jpg

post-6653-0-65812200-1394393973_thumb.jpg

post-6653-0-30724400-1394394046_thumb.jpg

post-6653-0-59096100-1394394100_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 528
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I had been reading Roger's chapters in the DG book and I thought I'd try his method for edge work.  I found it easier (much easier) to do nice clean edges.  I have a few pictures of the process.  I apologies for the fuzziness of the first I wanted to show the channel.  I used a vaining gouge to cut the purfling to depth and then did each side.  I also found the small brass tool very useful for doing the inside part that blends with the arch.  In my opinion it's not much good for anything else.   The outside part of the scoop I did with gouges and scraper.  I have yet to roll the edges over to the final edge thickness.  I want to wait till I've finished scraping and finishing the arch.  I've got two fiddles started and I used this method on both backs.  So far I'm a convert      

I have been doing the channel to the edge for my last five or six , I doubt I will go back to the thin platform edge again.

Berl, Did you catch the part where ,after using the narrow gouge in the channel ,he then uses a wider /flatter gouge to cut up from the channel and into the arching from the purfling?that is ,cuts perpendicular to the channel?.It works very fast with almost no care......I did build a scrapper holder like Tom Croens..(please forgive if that's wrong) I found it good for making things even ...but it is not an auto pilot tool, I don't use mine these days ,preferring low angle  light and a round edge scraper. I also find it (a plane round scrapper) helps in the button area,to be in the swing of things and not be switching thing around tool wise. Being able to shift the angle of the cut on soft spruce is also an advantage of hand held scrappers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Berl, you are no exception to the rule that violin makers can always fall back on making some extra dough by hiring out as hand models.  Seriously, thanks for the photos which are very instructive.  On the flip side, THANKS A LOT!  I thought I had my tool addiction well in hand but now hear the violin maker's equivalent of demon rum calling my name.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've wondered how useful those channel scraper holders are. If nothing else, I guess it acts as a depth stop to ensure consistent thickness of the channel.

It worked very well just for that.  It has a automatic stop and it's a consistant channel.  I ground a little different shape on the other end of the scraper for the center bouts.  It's the only thing I've ever found it good for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been doing the channel to the edge for my last five or six , I doubt I will go back to the thin platform edge again.

Berl, Did you catch the part where ,after using the narrow gouge in the channel ,he then uses a wider /flatter gouge to cut up from the channel and into the arching from the purfling?that is ,cuts perpendicular to the channel?.It works very fast with almost no care......I did build a scrapper holder like Tom Croens..(please forgive if that's wrong) I found it good for making things even ...but it is not an auto pilot tool, I don't use mine these days ,preferring low angle  light and a round edge scraper. I also find it (a plane round scrapper) helps in the button area,to be in the swing of things and not be switching thing around tool wise. Being able to shift the angle of the cut on soft spruce is also an advantage of hand held scrappers.

Yes, I got that part too.  Looking forward to VSA, hope to see you there again.  We'll have the same bunch in our room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Berl, you are no exception to the rule that violin makers can always fall back on making some extra dough by hiring out as hand models.  Seriously, thanks for the photos which are very instructive.  On the flip side, THANKS A LOT!  I thought I had my tool addiction well in hand but now hear the violin maker's equivalent of demon rum calling my name.

Thank you Julian.  These little brass tools are expensive, I believe around $100.00.  That's a lot of money to do one job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's how I sharpen mine also.  The blades are pretty thin and you need to be able to go in both directions with the grain.   I'm not saying the tools are worthless, I'm just saying the idea is great, just not the tool.  I've come up with a dozen things that I thought were great ideas, but not so good after I made them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey guys and galls, I am pleased to see you using this system.  I love it. It is just so logical and easy. BUT it ain't my system, however much I might wish it were.   

I would also encourage people to try it.  It works very well and is much easier that doing it with a tight curve, opening up both sides of the purfling gives you much more room.  I know you don't want to take credit for this but I didn't see anyone else figuring it out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would also encourage people to try it.  It works very well and is much easier that doing it with a tight curve, opening up both sides of the purfling gives you much more room.  I know you don't want to take credit for this but I didn't see anyone else figuring it out.

I think Roger is saying that the system is Cremonese and they should get the credit, and that he is just discovering their system.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started to use this system in 1988 after reading the article by Roger "Classical edgework" and then I never went back.

It fit perfectly with my tendency in the early years to widen too much the channel to the edge, and so I decided to follow my evidently genuine cremonese inclination!! :DB)

I do not follow it to the letter and I prefer to make the purfling after the carving of the fluting, but I think the basic concept is quite right.

 

Davidepost-70417-0-57144000-1394534238_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably yes, but only if you're doing baroque instruments, of course. ;)

I prefer a more reliable modern thickness caliper for a modern violin...... B)

 

Davide

Davide, I'm not sure I understand the difference in baroque and modern edge channeling.  The thing I found so much easier is the way this method opens everything up on both sides of  the purfling.  Oh, by the way Davide, your video on inlaying purfling is a beautiful thing to watch.  Your workstyle  and movements are so graceful to watch, a thing of beauty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I consider purfling through a thick edge a fundamental flaw in Roger's "Cremonese" system. I, like Davide Sora, channel the edge first. I believe the evidence, in the form of knife cuts and glue ghosts in the channel of Cremonese instruments, favors this interpretation.

Can you image purfling any of the decorated Stradivaris through a 5mm edge?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...