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Peter K-G

Boxwood pegs - staining

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Main thing is that they should fit properly.
If you apply a water stain after fitting they may swell unevenly. 

I use danish oil to seal the shafts and ends, let it dry then apply some Vandyke brown in two layers. 
Works ok. 

Why did you cut the ends short ? 
Nice scroll. 





 

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Thanks

 

From experience the length will be perfect in a month or so (I hope) and I need a new reamer because the peg wholes are not smooth. Probably one of the reasons why the pegs will go in deeper after a while.

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 I need a new reamer because the peg wholes are not smooth.

 

You will achieve a smoother peghole if you use the reamer backwards for the last 2-3mm of entry of the pegs.

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Peter:  The method Roger Hansell recommends works very well.  The only thing I leave out, is heating up the nitric acid - it still works well at room temperature.   (Also the quality of the boxwood itself has a large effect on the success of the staining)

 

Here's roger's method:  http://www.hansellviolins.com/ekmps/shops/rogerhansell/index.asp?function=WEBPAGE&page=14

 

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I hate nitric acid.

 

I bought a litre of it about twenty years ago, and still have about 980cc, and I don't want it around. I avoid boxwood pegs if I can help it for this very reason. 

 

If you do need to get nitric acid, try to get a very small amount, and leave someone else with the responsibility of storing it.

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The nitric acid is nasty stuff and ammonia is also a strong chemical, best used outside.  If I had my choice for pegs, I would always use ebony.   But the nitric acid method works very well when I use boxwood.

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If you know who is the producer of your pegs ask them how they do it. But most of them use nitric acid follow by fumigation with ammonia. (Tempel as well as Lorenz company do this). You can control the color by the time of the ammonia fumigation. After this i use the Hammerl Fingerboard oil wich get harden, follow by smoothing.

 

 

 

 

post-1262-0-47324800-1393169969_thumb.jpg

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Thanks everyone

 

I'm not up to Michael K's standard yet, that's for sure, very nice scroll, pegs and varnish!

 

post-37356-0-20526500-1393181862_thumb.jpgpost-37356-0-68149800-1393181926_thumb.jpg

 

I just went for the coloring, it's ok but not perfect, I will color them a second time and polish them a little.

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Previously I used boxwood fittings quite a lot, but like Conor, I never really liked the association with Nitric Acid, especially for chin rests and tailpieces. I watched the Hill chinrest makers swilling their chinrests about in the stuff. It looked very unhealthy. For the last 30 years or so I have only use this type of fitting when the customer insisted. I prefer ebony with gold mounts. But if you want a great peg that looks like box and does not require additional staining, the mountain mahogany fittings that Eric Meyer makes are beautiful. 

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Thanks

 

From experience the length will be perfect in a month or so (I hope) and I need a new reamer because the peg wholes are not smooth. Probably one of the reasons why the pegs will go in deeper after a while.

When you re-ream existing holes you remove the old compressed wood. When putting a peg into a newly reamed hole, it takes a little while for the maple to compress allowing proper seating of the peg. This is why the pegs eventually wind up deeper than the way they were fit. Likewise with fitting pegs in a new instrument.

 

What type of reamer are you using? The first one I had was fluted all the way around. It cut quickly but left a slightly octagon hole upon close inspection. A hole cut in this manner will take awhile for the peg to compress the flats of the octagon out into a round hole.

 

The reamer I use now only has 2 or 3 flutes on one side, so it cuts a very clean, round hole, albeit cutting much slower.

 

I haven't tried a spiral reamer yet; I would imagine it should cut fast and produce a more true, round hole, but I question if it would produce as smooth a hole as the partially fluted reamer.

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