Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Sacconi book


Roger Hargrave
 Share

Recommended Posts

What de-values a rare book is conservation...

 

 

 

I'm intrigued by this statement Carlo. Do you really mean "conservation" or did you mean "misguided attempts at restoration". I think there's a difference.

 

I love my books and I've recently discovered that plastic sleeving you buy in rolls to protect the covers (libraries use it a lot).  I hope your grandma approves of that stuff because I've been happily covering all my favourites with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I meant non prevention of deterioration, sorry  :)

 

Plastic she usually uses in books that have bindings of materials that just can not handle time, a few books I have she wrapped in plastic or when I would hold them in my hand pieces of the binding would just fall on the floor.  Usually only in these situations, libraries I assume is to protect from the users and excess of fingers. But in a private collection that is usually not an issue. I assume the plastic is also good protection from dust. The only downside is the looks.

 

The most damage is usually from the way people take the book out of the shelf, by puling from the top of the binding, one must place the finger on the paper and than pull it, force applied on the paper, never on the binding.

 

The other good thing she thought me is to always clean bookshelves with turpentine, keeps the book eating bugs away, and if one does not mind the smell, a little piece of camphor behind the books also helps.

 

Some stains in white paper can be removed with oxalic acid, I've seen her wash one compete book (after dis-assembly), and it looked like new.

 

What I asked her a few months ago was about varnish, what sort of varnish and what should I do to the leather? She gave me a recipe (which I lost, so will ask her again), a very old varnish recipe from a monk, which she uses in her bindings and restorations when the leather needs (too dry). I'll call her soon and ask her about these things as soon as my internet antenna arrives, my connection is too slow even for a skype voice call now. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The more I read these Sacconi threads the closer I get to just scanning the whole darned thing into the computer.  I have already done that with a lot of the drawings. Trying to find a particular passage in a physical book is tough.  I'm going to also try post processing the scanned pages with OCR software. I haven't seen good results on free violin making books I've downloaded from Google.  I'm hoping I can have better luck.

 

Joe

 

Yes, probably the biggest single problem with this book is the lack of an index. If someone prints it again this would be an important addition and these days it is not such a difficult task to prepare one. This is the great advantage of the Dover publications over the original Hill books. I often use both together. I have tried to persuade Peter Biddulph to publish a Dover type edition of the Del Gesu book but so far with little success.  Such publishers do us great service. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With todays technology it would be easy for the copy right owner (or anyone) to copy a book to electronic form. The problem is piracy!

 

Post an electronic Sacconi book here and no one would buy it anymore. On the other hand it's not for sale anymore so what would be the harm? The copyright owner is not getting anything for second hand sale anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, probably the biggest single problem with this book is the lack of an index. If someone prints it again this would be an important addition and these days it is not such a difficult task to prepare one. This is the great advantage of the Dover publications over the original Hill books. I often use both together. I have tried to persuade Peter Biddulph to publish a Dover type edition of the Del Gesu book but so far with little success.  Such publishers do us great service. 

As far as I understand, the index for the Hill Stradivari book was done by Rembert Wurlitzer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got my first Sacconi when I was still at school, and have used it ever since.

 

I sometimes wish the varnish chapter had never been translated at all. How many thousands of hours have gone into trying to make those brews work. Trouble is, even when you'd decided that the man was stone mad, or taking the mick, you'd come back every year or so, and give it another bash, because it was Sacconi. I did make one batch that was simply beautiful once, but you had to get it all on in one go, - a second coat went to pot - and I ran out before I got near a fiddle with it. I could never make it again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got my first Sacconi when I was still at school, and have used it ever since.

 

I sometimes wish the varnish chapter had never been translated at all. How many thousands of hours have gone into trying to make those brews work. Trouble is, even when you'd decided that the man was stone mad, or taking the mick, you'd come back every year or so, and give it another bash, because it was Sacconi. I did make one batch that was simply beautiful once, but you had to get it all on in one go, - a second coat went to pot - and I ran out before I got near a fiddle with it. I could never make it again.

 

Yes and the drawings but for all its faults it's still boss. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I spoke with grandma, her answers in italic.

 

Is writing in rare books is a bad thing?

-No, just do it neatly.

 

Does it diminishes the value of a rare book?

-No, you know how much you like some of your old books which are full of old annotations.

 

One old rare book in prestine condition, and the same exact book full of annotations, which one is worth more?

-If they are well studied annotations, or good highlights, most likely the one with the annotations will be worth more, specially if they are old annotations.

 

Varnish recipe for books, she said she has tried many, this is by far the best she has used.

 

Anhydrous Lanolin (wool grease) - 7 ounces
Bees Wax - ½ ounce
Cedar Oil (cedarwood oil) - 1 ounce
Hexane (Refined Petroleum Ether) - 11 ounces
 
Recipe from monsignor Nabuco
Protecs, conserves and softens the leather.
 
With a rubber cloth (pad),spread it gently on the leather.
Do not saturate, use in small careful amounts.
 
-------
 
I'll add to that, take all your collection and place an ex-libris or your violin maker label in the back of one of the initial pages, it becomes a marked collection, ads to the history of the book, helps if you lend the book and I believe raises the value of the collection.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll add to that, take all your collection and place an ex-libris or your violin maker label in the back of one of the initial pages, it becomes a marked collection, ads to the history of the book, helps if you lend the book and I believe raises the value of the collection.

 

Carlo, the Accademia Segreto di Maestronet is sending its best Ninjas to collect R.H.'s Copy of Sacconi.  It’s one of those copies.  Once we have all of the unique Figure 77’s, we can line them up, and we’ll finally know...

 

[oops, thought this was a PM]

 

Addie, evil genius.

 

evil-genius-smiley.gif?1292867590

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In any case, the Sacconi book remains an interesting read and an interesting book.

 

Many things about it perhaps were included as a bit of an idea from a publisher, regarding what it would need to become a  well selling edition. The feeling I get is that if Sacconi were to write a book solely regarding those things he knew for certain, or wanted to say, the book would probably be much thinner and less saleable in the violin makiing world...

 

So the varnishing section seems a bit forced and confusing-  to unworkable. Perhaps the arching and thicknessing sections were a tad more graphic and stilted than necessary...

 

Still - I must agree here - one of the the best, if not the best of the available modern works on making to date.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Off topic:

 

Roger,

You just happened to open the  Stradivari  book (pp 30 and 31 of my Dover edition) to two pages which seem to be two of the most puzzling in the whole book.  The Hills seem to be tying themselves in knots and contradicting themselves concerning whether Stradivari, in his early making years, made violins for Nicolo Amati.  On page 30, they state:

 

"Now these statements [ about early Strads which supposedly originally had Amati labels] are liable to be misunderstood, as they imply that a certain number of Stradivari's instruments of the ealiest epoch exist, which were originally made for Amati, whose label they bore.  Such, however, is not the case.  If they existed, where are they?  We have centainly not met with them."

 

After having asked, Where are those supposed early Strads that had Amati labels?, on that same page the Hills go on:  "We may add that we are acquainted with only four other examples in which, similarly, the original label may have been one of Amati."  Well, how may more examples would one hope to find?  Isn't four enough?

 

If pursuing this is of interest, I'll start another thread.  The issue I'm raising is what the Hills had to say about the relationship between Stradivari and Amati and thus is far from the topic of this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

To me it's quite reassuring to see that others also (ab?)use their books this way. I like to think that some books have a life of their own and just live alongside their owners. Most books that I really love and they show their signs of wear and tear.

 

The "Stradivari" book by Stewart Pollens resides almost permanently in my backpack. The pages are covered with inscriptions, underlings and filled with scraps of paper, the dust cover is worn down, and the pages almost come apart. Other books like that of the Hills, Grant O'Brien (Ruckers), Richard Sennett (The Craftsman), Robert Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) and Robert Lundberg (Historical Lute Construction) share the same fate. I have a photocopy of Lundberg's book in my workshop, just because the original would be completely destroyed if I kept it there.

 

I really love to find old books that have been used extensively by previous owners. Sometimes the little scribblings give clearance or new insights.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me it's quite reassuring to see that others also (ab?)use their books this way. I like to think that some books have a life of their own and just live alongside their owners. Most books that I really love and they show their signs of wear and tear.

 

The "Stradivari" book by Stewart Pollens resides almost permanently in my backpack. The pages are covered with inscriptions, underlings and filled with scraps of paper, the dust cover is worn down, and the pages almost come apart. Other books like that of the Hills, Grant O'Brien (Ruckers), Richard Sennett (The Craftsman), Robert Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) and Robert Lundberg (Historical Lute Construction) share the same fate. I have a photocopy of Lundberg's book in my workshop, just because the original would be completely destroyed if I kept it there.

 

I really love to find old books that have been used extensively by previous owners. Sometimes the little scribblings give clearance or new insights.

Thanks for the reminder Javaca,

I just put my $50 Amazon gift card to too use! Also in my research found this great Stewart Pollens Video on YoouTube

Five Centuries of Violin Making:

Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, probably the biggest single problem with this book is the lack of an index. If someone prints it again this would be an important addition and these days it is not such a difficult task to prepare one. This is the great advantage of the Dover publications over the original Hill books. I often use both together. I have tried to persuade Peter Biddulph to publish a Dover type edition of the Del Gesu book but so far with little success.  Such publishers do us great service. 

Someone prepared a usable index.  I will try to dig up my photocopy when I get back to Salt Lake and see if it will post in a legible form.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...