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Lipinski Strad Recovered


duane88
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Since this wan't a 'hit' (i.e. some anonymous unscrupulous collector wanting a Strad for his private collection) I now want to find out what the thief was thinking he would do with the violin when he stole it. 

 

Apparently he knew the value of the instrument - and handled it gently...and he knew enough to toss the case (if there was a tracking device in it)...then what? 

 

His last attempt at selling art back to the guy he stole it from didn't go all that well...

 

But then again, he probably didn't think the Tazer would be traced to him either... :ph34r:

 

Maybe he's just a slow learner?

 

Glad it all turned out okay and no one/no violin was permanently injured during the incident... :)

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Since this wan't a 'hit' (i.e. some anonymous unscrupulous collector wanting a Strad for his private collection) I now want to find out what the thief was thinking he would do with the violin when he stole it. 

 

From the New York Times article cited above in post #9, here's a possible answer:

 

“This individual has done fairly high-end art theft in the past, and the last time his plan was to keep it in a safe place for a number of years and then bring it out of hiding and do something with it,” Chief Flynn said. “So theoretically it’s plausible that might have been his plan here — to keep it off the market and out of sight for a number of years.”

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Sure...but then what? Pass it off as a Vuillaume?

 

In keeping with the caution, which emerged from the other thread, against creating theft primers, let's agree that stealing a well documented, expensive violin is stupid, should never be done because it can't be sold, and is a waste of the thief's time, and thus we hope we're discouraging future thefts.

 

But I bet theft of very valuable, one of a kind art works and instruments will continue anyway.

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In keeping with the caution, which emerged from the other thread, against creating theft primers, let's agree that stealing a well documented, expensive violin is stupid, should never be done because it can't be sold, and is a waste of the thief's time, and thus we hope we're discouraging future thefts.

 

But I bet theft of very valuable, one of a kind art works and instruments will continue anyway.

Yeah, a real pro would have relabeled it as a Hargrave or a Saunders or such, and sold it on eBay, then gotten caught anyway from the stink we'd raise on The Auction Thread :lol:

 

Jeeze Louise, a Strad in the attic!!  No imagination there at all.

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Since this wan't a 'hit' (i.e. some anonymous unscrupulous collector wanting a Strad for his private collection) I now want to find out what the thief was thinking he would do with the violin when he stole it. 

 

Apparently he knew the value of the instrument - and handled it gently...and he knew enough to toss the case (if there was a tracking device in it)...then what? 

 

His last attempt at selling art back to the guy he stole it from didn't go all that well...

 

But then again, he probably didn't think the Tazer would be traced to him either... :ph34r:

 

Maybe he's just a slow learner?

 

Glad it all turned out okay and no one/no violin was permanently injured during the incident... :)

 

 

It may not have been injured (AMEN!) but I tell you, the thought of someone's nasty hands on something so personally connected to it's owner makes my insides crawl, had it been with me I guarantee the police would have had need for a straight jacket and a few tasers to keep me from pulling the heart strings out of the thief and using them on the instrument...

 

I've gone thermonuclear with much less provocation, some incredibly arrogant 60 year old "art critic" with the clouded notion that he was beyond respecting personal space and objects decided to fiddle (open and inspect/rough up the compartments lids of my CLOSED case with disdain god knows why) without permission and I literally went violent to the point of my instructor pulling me to the side. In my defense, he had it coming as he had already attempted to take violins out from under people's hands without asking ( rudely )-_- This "man" was one of those music critics that was never published and never actually played an instrument in his life.

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Yeah, a real pro would have relabeled it as a Hargrave or a Saunders or such, and sold it on eBay, then gotten caught anyway from the stink we'd raise on The Auction Thread :lol:

 

 

What stink raised?  You mean the one where someone is convinced it's contemporary Chinese and someone else knows it's a hundred year old German? 

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In all seriousness, I would hope that if someone saw an instrument on any auction site and suspected it to be stolen, they wouldn't make an issue of the instrument publicly, and complaining to the auction management might not be a good idea either.  You would not want the guilty party to be alerted and disappear.  Instead, you would immediately alert the appropriate law enforcement to pursue the matter.

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