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franciscus

To do, or not to do: that is the question

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My lutherie reached the level at which  I'm totally willing to take off the top of the rather cheap violin, glue the cracks and return top back. So far, my surgery caused no major damage, and patients have remained quite alive. However, now I have on the desk violin on which I played the last couple of years, which, in addition to a few open seams, has a problem shown in the following picture:

 

54dugp.jpg

 

Honestly, I'm not that broken rib even noticed until 6 months ago and I do not know the cause of it. It is rather possible that I bought the violin in such a state (a few years ago).

 

I do not see the way for repair this rib without opening the top, but, this operation is very far from something I like to do. Beside, speaking about my "lutherie", I have a limit to which I am ready to go. This limit is not very sharp, but lies somewhere above classes Lewis and Son student violins. I do not know anything about this violin, I bought it from some guy who knew only that it was purchased in Linz, some 30-40 years ago. Here are some pictures of this violin:

 

tah6iv.jpg

 

 

ampki8.jpg

 

Violin is unlabeled. Varnish, I would say, is original. My knowledge about determining the age and origin is close to nothing, mostly collected here on MN, but I will be brave enough to declare that it seems to me that (1) this is a Schönbach violin and (2) it was made about 100 years ago. That's it: I said, and probably wrong, but I had to. It was stronger than me.

 

What I want from you is to help me in determination of its origin and age, in order to make me able to assess whether it repair itself or to wait for the opportunity to entrust it to someone who does not have such a dilemma as I do.

Edited by franciscus

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Franciscus,

This looks as if it is missing varnish caused by a drip of glue from a repaired seam not a "broken rib". The hot glue used in instrument repair and construction shrinks a great deal when drying causing the varnish to pop off over time. Check the rest of the ribs to make sure there is no other similar glue excess. If there is DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE DRY! Apply a small piece of moist paper towel and wipe off glue when it softens.

No need to remove the top, the t-up can and should be done from the outside.

Jerry

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Indeed...  I'd agree with Jerry from what I can see in the photo.  Hide glue has an incredible grip strength as it dries and shrinks... and can be/is used to achieve controlled chipping of glass.  

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I suppose this just goes to show how diffucult it is to judge such things from a photo. I would rather shove on the rib with my thumb to see if this “crack” moves to tell. The unvarnished ca. mm. wide bare wood boarder between the back varnish finishing and where the lower part of the rib is, suggests to me that the rib has been shoved in towards the inside body, and the lower part of the “crack” looks like it could be endgrain looking out. Should my interpretation of the photo be right (and you are the person with the violin, and the only one who can check!), I would have too remove the top, and make a counterform upon which I could set a cramp.

Yes you are quite right, an inexpensive Schönbach (or not far away) “Dutzendarbeit”, +/-100 odd years old, which will at least mean that there shouldn’t be a corner block in the way of the repair :)

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I suppose this just goes to show how diffucult it is to judge such things from a photo. I would rather shove on the rib with my thumb to see if this “crack” moves to tell. The unvarnished ca. mm. wide bare wood boarder between the back varnish finishing and where the lower part of the rib is, suggests to me that the rib has been shoved in towards the inside body, and the lower part of the “crack” looks like it could be endgrain looking out. Should my interpretation of the photo be right (and you are the person with the violin, and the only one who can check!), I would have too remove the top, and make a counterform upon which I could set a cramp.

Yes you are quite right, an inexpensive Schönbach (or not far away) “Dutzendarbeit”, +/-100 odd years old, which will at least mean that there shouldn’t be a corner block in the way of the repair :)

I'm with Jacob here.  Looking at the plate edge showing at that point, the rib appears deflected inward and bare wood seems to be showing along the assumed crack.  No corner block and false corner block Dutzends are bad about this, perhaps because the rib thicknessses aren't well controlled.  For me, it';s a common repair.

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Is that the "Rope" Jeffrey was talking about yesterday? :)

Nope, perfectly candid, it's easy to agree with you when you're right :lol: ,  

I see this not uncommonly usually on the c-bout ribs of lower end Dutzends where the bend is most stressed.  I suspect that it normally means that the bend wasn't heated properly and there was a weakness from sloppy carving as well.  This particular case looks more like the area got hit with something, though.  I prefer to fix these by inserting a purpose carved block when it's well placed for that.  How would you handle it? :)

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With Aplomb - the violin trade needs Plombs . . .

 

 

 

 

Nope, perfectly candid, it's easy to agree with you when you're right :lol: ,  

I see this not uncommonly usually on the c-bout ribs of lower end Dutzends where the bend is most stressed.  I suspect that it normally means that the bend wasn't heated properly and there was a weakness from sloppy carving as well.  This particular case looks more like the area got hit with something, though.  I prefer to fix these by inserting a purpose carved block when it's well placed for that.  How would you handle it? :)

:wacko:   ^_^   :D

 

 

 

Merry Yuletide . . .

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I am very sorry because I'm limited to one post per 24 hours, so I have to wait my time for answering. I need 2 more approved posts before I can communicate normally.

 

@ Jerry Pasewicz & Jeffrey Holmes:

 

In reality, as in the pictures, this fracture is very inconspicuous, so it took me a long time to notice.

 

@ jacobsaunders & Violadamore:

 

The diagnosis is completely accurate, You've given me enough instructions for repair. Thanks a lot.

 

Beside, this violin sings very nicely with Warchall Carneol strings. When I restring this violin again, I will post the pictures of the repair.

 

Interestingly, my first violin teacher was from Luby, my grandmother was born near Luby, I have two violins made ​​there. It must be fate.

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