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Kimmo89

Amati, Stradivari, Guarneri inside mold's

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I am getting in to work soon.

I have the wood waiting for 4 violins. Beautiful maple. I only was disappointed that 3 of the rib blocks were already sawed. If i can get the pranch lined outside from the largest piece, I try the bone purfling to it.

Since the molds has wide upper block slot, I had to order willow blocks for viola.

 

But there is some important tools I want to make first.

Its then easy to carve a violin when everything is ready.

 

 

 

Kimmo

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The other two piece back has a nice tigh grain. Other is with little wider grain.

And same thing to the one piece backs but of course both are wide.

 

I selected the wood like this for the tests.

 

From spruce i wont comromise of the quality.

I have 2 pieces with a nice clear sound and 110 years inside a 130mm. It is ok.

 

 

Kimmo

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Oh come on Carl, there is always room for the odd philosopher here on MN.

 

Yeah, we have lots of odd philosophers here.  What's one more?

 

Well from what I can see the wood is first class.

 

If I had wood that good, I too would be nervous about starting my first one.

The first one won't be that great, unless you are Strad reincarnated.  Everyone needs to stumble here and there over the many details it takes to make a violin, and learn, and make less errors the next time. 

I used what I thought was my "worst" set of wood for my first violin, just to get the practice.  Actually, it is now, only after a dozen or so, that I feel like I sortof almost know what I'm doing.  But not quite.

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I already have almost completed my firts one seen in the starting first violin thread.

 

Not that great looking, but i have learned the mistakes and these will be out in next violins.

The back is first class on that, and I regret I used it for the first one.

 

 

Kimmo

 

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I already have almost completed my firts one seen in the starting first violin thread.

 

Not that great looking, but i have learned the mistakes and these will be out in next violins.

The back is first class on that, and I regret I used it for the first one.

 

 

Kimmo

I did the same...spared no expense on my first. Beginner's mistake. I think nearly everyone does flub it up completely, and there goes this gorgeous, over-the-top wood.

But from what I can see your arch looks really beautifully crafted. Nice overall look. Try not to have regrets. ..you did awesome for this being your first! Have you decided on a ground/varnish? It will be a challenge not to burn out those flames. But it looks like you have been careful and thinking through the process so far. You will do fine!

Setup is a mother too--have you done that part before? I do recommend getting some practice in that area, and also getting help on the pegholes. That is kind of one of the last things that you need to really sweat.

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If I had had the money, as a student, I would also have used the best wood. Not only did I not have the money, but my teacher told me not to waste a good piece. However, although I don't think that you have wasted this piece, we all go on believing that the next one will be better. Even after many hundreds of instruments I still believe the next will be better. Congratulations, and now before you start varnishing this one, start preparing the next one. As Joe would say, "On we go!"

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I did the same...spared no expense on my first. Beginner's mistake. I think nearly everyone does flub it up completely, and there goes this gorgeous, over-the-top wood.

But from what I can see your arch looks really beautifully crafted. Nice overall look. Try not to have regrets. ..you did awesome for this being your first! Have you decided on a ground/varnish? It will be a challenge not to burn out those flames. But it looks like you have been careful and thinking through the process so far. You will do fine!

Setup is a mother too--have you done that part before? I do recommend getting some practice in that area, and also getting help on the pegholes. That is kind of one of the last things that you need to really sweat.

Fitting set and strings are coming to me inside next week. I think I can take the first sound out of it right after that.

I have made the frame for peg shaper, the blades coming in the same order.

Before this, I have only fitted the shell of the willow flutes when I was 7 years old.

 

The edgework still looks rough in those pictures, also the scroll and neck. But it takes not much time to whipe everything even and clean.

But I have to look for the varnish soon as I can. I believe I must test the varnish much too.

 

 

If I had had the money, as a student, I would also have used the best wood. Not only did I not have the money, but my teacher told me not to waste a good piece. However, although I don't think that you have wasted this piece, we all go on believing that the next one will be better. Even after many hundreds of instruments I still believe the next will be better. Congratulations, and now before you start varnishing this one, start preparing the next one. As Joe would say, "On we go!"

Yes, since im jobless right now, I have to be content to eat porridge.

 

 

 

Kimmo

 

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To get good, really good and to develop a style like Strad or David Burgess or any other good maker, you need to make lots of instruments on a regular basis.    

Gad zooks! If I haven't already sent you a free toaster, please remind me to do so. :lol:

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I have a Guarnerius inside mold that I want to sell. If anyone would be interested in it I’ll send dimensions and photos. I’m not looking to make lots of money out of it, I’d just like it to go to someone who would use and appreciate it.

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I made an inside mold from the Plowden poster. I followed Dilworth’s method as given in The Best of Trade Secrets volume 1. You start with the outline of the plates. I copied from the back plate. I used the bass side outline as treble had wear in the upper bout where the left hand touches the instrument. I then used this to make the treble outline. I recommend his method. You will end up with a violin that has the same plate outline as the original.

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I know this is a really old thread but it is worth noting that  there is 1:1 ct scan of the rib garland on the Plowden poster. That will give you the most accurate outline. It also shows where the blocks were placed and their dimensions. 

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