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saintjohnbarleycorn

what kind of pegs are these

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they are wood on the outside of the peg box but plastic on the inside, 

they seem to be glued in with some sort of bushing, but no gearing is evident, looks like direct drive.

 

the screw on the end , is that for tightening , for slippage?? 

 

thanks for any help on this.. post-24148-0-96155200-1386363363_thumb.jpgpost-24148-0-12120800-1386363369_thumb.jpgpost-24148-0-08029600-1386363374_thumb.jpg

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they are wood on the outside of the peg box but plastic on the inside, 

they seem to be glued in with some sort of bushing, but no gearing is evident, looks like direct drive.

 

the screw on the end , is that for tightening , for slippage?? 

 

thanks for any help on this.. attachicon.gifDSCF0004.JPGattachicon.gifDSCF0005.JPGattachicon.gifDSCF0006.JPG

Roth-Caspari

 

There is a fiber bushing glued into tapered hole nearest the peg head. The peg shaft rotates together with the peghead but when you tighten the screw it pinches the glued in fiber plug, something like a clutch on a car, and increases the friction. Once regulated they work pretty well and are safe on student grade instruments. I say student grade because they are not very elegant.

 

I couldn't tell you if they are made anymore but I think not.

 

Bruce 

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Interesting question. Interesting answers.

 

Yes, as much as everyone seems to hate these pegs - they are very commonly found on (at least the older) Roth student violins.

And on other Chinese violins, as knock offs. Though the knock offs are often pretty rough and found not to work well, or for long - the Caspari pegs themselves are fairly well made, and usually work well for a very long time - and can be replaced or repaired fairly easily. (at least - they used to be common...)

Once you get used to them, and how they work, they are often a really good alternative to friction pegs, for student violins and for keeping things easily in tune...

 

Yes the screw on the end is for tightening for slippage.

 These pegs are usually absolutely great news for student grade or first violins, where high quality, well fit friction pegs are a great rarity and not really ever kept well, lubed well, or any of the rest of it.

Very often, the only problem with them, is when the outside "washer" becomes unglued from the pegbox wall - and then the whole thing slips when the peg's under string tension.

 

So - even though accomplished or even moderately well accomplished "violinists" usually don't like them, or their 'look', and will recommend changing to regular friction pegs - I'll recommend that they are great things for a beginning student violin, where absolute tonal considerations are about the last thing on anyone's mind, and where being in tune - and staying in tune, is a far bigger factor - and where 'only mechanical pegs' are not a necessity, either way, for onlookers.

 

They get a big yeah! (yes) from my perspective, as I work with very many student violins. Friction pegs are often very much more problematic than well made mechanical pegs are, in these beginning quality violins - they're basically made for (usually somewhat better quality) childrens, student, or "first violins".  

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Interesting question. Interesting answers.

 

 they are very commonly found on (at least the older) Roth student violins.

For those wondering. I believe CT means "Scherl and Roth", not E.H. Roth.  ALOT of 60's ER Pfretzschners (think Scherl/roth) had them.  I used to hate them, until I learned that if I took them apart and made sure the fiber bushing was glued in correctly, then lubed the screw mech with wax, reassembled, they actually worked ok.  No reason to take them off.  Took me awhile to  realize this.  Problem usually is, the screw mech isn;t lubed, and you tighten the crap out of the screw to make it hold, then the bushing gives way and spins, so you tighten the screw more, resulting in frustration.  No, they don't make them anymore, once in a while (last week) I run across them new in box.  Out of maybe 1000 vioins in my smaller rental violin stock, I have maybe 25 with those pegs, (mostly 3/4 Pfretz) and I don't mind them at all.....anymore.  jeff

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