Who knows? Maybe it's more than it looks?


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Well...since I'm waiting on something else, I thought I'd upload my old mystery violin.  Sorry for the photo quality...

 

I purchased a coffin case (with this carcass inside) back around 1985.  I always assumed it had no value.  Maybe I'm wrong?

 

It has no label that I can see.

 

OVFront.jpg

 

OVBack.jpg

 

OVSide.jpg

 

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is the scroll/neck made of beech or maple?

 

I have no idea...esp. when something is varnished...sorry.

 

The case is much more interesting: folk art.  Somebody alert Glenn.

 

Can we see more pictures of it?  

 

Thanks!

 

Of the case?  I did strip and revarnish it way back when...and glue in new felt (badly)...it was a weekend project at the time...so if it had any value...I ruined it entirely...but I can take more pics...what would you like to see?

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The case is much more interesting: folk art.  Somebody alert Glenn.

 

Can we see more pictures of it?  

 

Thanks!

 

Glenn is duly alerted!

 

Indeed, this case is very interesting and I wish I had seen it before completing my recent article on early cases for the JVSA.

 

I would very much appreciate more pictures, open and closed, with particular attention to any metal fittings.

 

The surface doesn't look too bad. Was this picture taken before or after you 'improved' it?

 

Glenn

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"This fine, rare, late 18th century Saxon influenced Italian violin, (given the imbalance of the scroll possibly from the circle of Deconet) is in obvious need of TLC.........." :lol::P

 

Violadamore, why do you think this Saxon fiddle is from the late 18th century? Or maybe you don't  as also  it isn't fine and rare.

Could it be a bit later?

I thought the outline is quite nice, but the carving and wood not of the higher grade violins of that time.

My 2 cents

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Sorry Addie...I can't help you with Paris...but I did take more case pics!

 

Glenn...the photos of the case are after my early attempts at refinishing and refurbishing...

 

While the violin does fit inside...it's such a tight fit it's dangerous to the violin...so I wouldn't use it even if I could...

 

OVCaseside.jpg

 

OVCaseCorners.jpg

 

 

OVCaseInterior.jpg

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According to Dr Kauert’s research, based on the report of the Handels und Gewerbe Kammer Plauen written in 1872-4, (which is roughly how old I would estimate the fiddle to be), these so-called “ordinäre” (“bottom of the range”) violins were made in Schönbach for the Markneukirchen Dealers, who exported them mostly to the United States, and in particular to the Southern US States, for 18 Marks per dozen. Of these 18 Marks, the Schönbach artizan would only have got a fraction. He was expected to take at most twelve hours to make the entire violin. Should he have achieved this, he could ”enjoy” a standard of living a nuance above starvation. Should one stop to think how far one would get oneself with a violin in 12 hours (in a hovel without any electricity or any of the things we take for granted today), the honest answer can only be “not very far”. To work with such a velocity is only concievable, should one only cut ONCE, and not make one single movement of the hand more than absolutly neccesary. The cheapest materials were used too, come what may, a beech scroll probably costing a kreutzer less than a maple one (which is why I asked), pegs and fingerboard from some cheaper (preferably free) wood stained black. Although many of these “ordinäre” violins are as grotty as sin, others wrest a degree of admiration (from me), and leave me to wonder what the Schönbach artizans might have achieved, had the parsimonious Southern States US violinist been able or willing to afford violins at 50 Marks per dozen.

BTW: I recently had to repair the disintegrated Cello version of this violin for a Cello teacher and steady customer since decades, who had inherited it, although I had spent well over an hour explaining to him that it “wasn’t worth it”, and was quite horrified how good it sounded afterwards. I certainly hope he isn’t going to give it to some pupil, who will come to me in a couple of years looking for a ”better Cello”.

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I can't imagine working that hard for so little (well, for a living...I have had some jobs that were like that over the years... <_< ).

 

I also can't imagine making a 'working' violin in 12 hours...

 

Wonder if this one would sound okay?

 

I also have a violin 'kit' - maybe the two of them will make for a retirement project for me down the road... ;)

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According to Dr Kauert’s research, based on the report of the Handels und Gewerbe Kammer Plauen written in 1872-4, (which is roughly how old I would estimate the fiddle to be), these so-called “ordinäre” (“bottom of the range”) violins were made in Schönbach for the Markneukirchen Dealers, who exported them mostly to the United States, and in particular to the Southern US States, for 18 Marks per dozen. Of these 18 Marks, the Schönbach artizan would only have got a fraction. He was expected to take at most twelve hours to make the entire violin. Should he have achieved this, he could ”enjoy” a standard of living a nuance above starvation. Should one stop to think how far one would get oneself with a violin in 12 hours (in a hovel without any electricity or any of the things we take for granted today), the honest answer can only be “not very far”. To work with such a velocity is only concievable, should one only cut ONCE, and not make one single movement of the hand more than absolutly neccesary. The cheapest materials were used too, come what may, a beech scroll probably costing a kreutzer less than a maple one (which is why I asked), pegs and fingerboard from some cheaper (preferably free) wood stained black. Although many of these “ordinäre” violins are as grotty as sin, others wrest a degree of admiration (from me), and leave me to wonder what the Schönbach artizans might have achieved, had the parsimonious Southern States US violinist been able or willing to afford violins at 50 Marks per dozen.

BTW: I recently had to repair the disintegrated Cello version of this violin for a Cello teacher and steady customer since decades, who had inherited it, although I had spent well over an hour explaining to him that it “wasn’t worth it”, and was quite horrified how good it sounded afterwards. I certainly hope he isn’t going to give it to some pupil, who will come to me in a couple of years looking for a ”better Cello”.

 

Poverty and extreme poverty was the norm for most working class people and artisans in those days wasn't it, pretty well across the globe.

The stories I have heard from my Grandfathers time . Tuberculosis was rampant. Childhood mortality. The sickening mentality of the landowners , "nobility" and big business owners, with some notable exceptions. It was as if the ideals of the Enlightenment got thrown out the window with the advent of the industrial revolution.

"The poor will always be with you" and let's keep it that way - that seemed to be the mentality.

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Poverty and extreme poverty was the norm for most working class people and artisans in those days wasn't it, pretty well across the globe.

The stories I have heard from my Grandfathers time . Tuberculosis was rampant. Childhood mortality. The sickening mentality of the landowners , "nobility" and big business owners, with some notable exceptions. It was as if the ideals of the Enlightenment got thrown out the window with the advent of the industrial revolution.

"The poor will always be with you" and let's keep it that way - that seemed to be the mentality.

World on fire...

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