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By contrast, I could believe that the chamfer on the front of Ron's bow (also curious) was done by Reindahl because everything he did was quirky.

 

Ron, correct me if I'm wrong but am I correct in thinking KR never made the same item twice? All the violins seem different so maybe we shouldn't expect too much similarity between the OP's bow and Rons.

 

Glenn

 

Glenn-  Mostly true, there seems to be a variety of models, etc.  Although a few traits are recurring, I think he became bored if he wasn't doing something new and different.

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I hope we can find out much more about Reindahl.  From the few pictures he seems to have been as masterful as he wanted to be.  Henley gave him a full page and raves about true genius.  That's often grounds for suspicion, of course.  But he made over 600 violins, violas, and 'cellos, yet in the auction guide (1980-1997) only one Reindahl lot was listed and it sold for a dismal $935.  What gives?  Was he just TOO individualistic or what?

 

I see there is a Reindahl violin listed at Ifshin in the $10,000-$20,000 range.

 

http://www.google.com/search?q=knute+reindahl+violin&client=safari&rls=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=eOiIUtDxO6KDiwLlwoG4Ag&ved=0CCsQsAQ&biw=1038&bih=710#imgdii=_

Will-

 

I have records of about 40 sales (both public & private) of his instruments, but I don't seem to have the one you cite- can you fill me in?   In my list of sales several run in the $10k - $14k range.

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FC

Do you believe that scoop treatment to the head of the Fetique could possibly be original? It looks very odd and very unFrench.

By contrast, I could believe that the chamfer on the front of Ron's bow (also curious) was done by Reindahl because everything he did was quirky.

 

Ron, correct me if I'm wrong but am I correct in thinking KR never made the same item twice? All the violins seem different so maybe we shouldn't expect too much similarity between the OP's bow and Rons.

 

I must say that I like the brand stamp on the OP's bow better than Ron's  <_<

 

Glenn

Hi Glenn, i dont know if the  feature on the Fetique head is original , i remember when it was sold and Raffin made no mention of it being added by someone later.So i assume it was original .It is strange though and i havent seen another one.

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Comparing the two bows:

 

Ron's head is strikingly individualistic.  Yucca's head looks a lot closer to some standard type of head, but still a little different.

 

Both frogs are out of parallel in that one end of the upper side of the frog is closer to the stick than the other end, but the direction of taper of the two frogs are opposite to each other.  The rounded top edge and the rounded heel end of Ron's frog make it more individualistic than Yucca's.  The thumb projection of Yucca's frog has been mostly carved away.

 

Yucca's button has the U-shaped German-style collar, while Ron's button has the sharply-incised double French-style collar.

The `u shaped` collar is more of a 19th century German style .In the 20th century they made just as many with a double collar ,so its not really a good way of distinguishing later German bows.

Apart from the stick of Rons which was probably made by The maker,the others including the last example look like German made examples probably imported an stamped.

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The `u shaped` collar is more of a 19th century German style .In the 20th century they made just as many with a double collar ,so its not really a good way of distinguishing later German bows...

 

Right.  Though I referred to one collar as German style and the other as French style, I did not mean to say that the two types were very useful in distinguishing bow nationalities.

 

Would it be correct to say that the U-shaped collar is a pretty good indicator of 19th century German work, but the other type of collar could be just about anything?  (German, French, Chinese, American, Brazilian,etc.)

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It is often an indicator of most 19th century German bows,but like everything there are exceptions. You probably have like i do ,dozens of German buttons in nickel silver ,usually assoicated with Bausch school bow and many Knopf bows. I think the better German makers started using the French style double collar in the late 1800`s . That said many earlier French bows can be easily mistaken as they often had just the single collar ,roughly done and when worn can resemble the Bausch type.

Heres a few typical German adjusters,the last one is more like a single collar,but the 4 previous illustrate the u shaped collar. You still get confusing ones which are French particularly from mid 19th century workshops.

post-3446-0-23700000-1384786075_thumb.jpg

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It would seem to be absolutly correct to call this “U-shaped collar” characteristic of the Markneukirchen area bows up to about 1900ish, when it seems to have died out until recently, when makers like Hans-Karl Schmidt have re-introduced it.

The bows thus far in this thread, with the exception of the one in Post #9, which seems to be a home made one by some self-taught maker who bought himself a Markneukichen Frog/Button, are all straight forward Markneukirchen wares from the turn of the century, with an abitary shop stamp. They could just as well have been stamped" “Pilar Leoben”, should they have landed in a different box at Markneukirchen Post office.

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It would seem to be absolutly correct to call this “U-shaped collar” characteristic of the Markneukirchen area bows up to about 1900ish, when it seems to have died out until recently, when makers like Hans-Karl Schmidt have re-introduced it.

The bows thus far in this thread, with the exception of the one in Post #9, which seems to be a home made one by some self-taught maker who bought himself a Markneukichen Frog/Button, are all straight forward Markneukirchen wares from the turn of the century, with an abitary shop stamp. They could just as well have been stamped" “Pilar Leoben”, should they have landed in a different box at Markneukirchen Post office.

That goes along with what the luthier that restored my bow told me when I asked him about the possible origen of the bow. He said it was probably of German make and somewhere around the turn of the century. (last century for all of us old folks!)

 

Mike

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