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Stephen Quinney

Huberman Strad Documentary

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Thank you for your timely posting, Stephen.  This is the second film on the subject that I have seen and though they cover much of the same ground, I enjoy them both very much.  If one can enjoy a story filled with so much sorrow and one can because the sorrow is redeemed by courage, integrity, and love of humanity.

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Thank you for your timely posting, Stephen.  This is the second film on the subject that I have seen and though they cover much of the same ground, I enjoy them both very much.  If one can enjoy a story filled with so much sorrow and one can because the sorrow is redeemed by courage, integrity, and love of humanity.

Can you point the direction for the second film?

 

Thanks

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A friend of mine sent me a link to an Israeli documentary about Huberman, the Nazis and Joshua Bell and the Huberman Strad amongst other things.  I had not come across it before so thought I would share it.  Apologies if you have seen it already.

 

http://roymandel.co.il/video/47248500

Thanks for the nlink.

Amazing story the covers the whole gambit of human existence and struggle to survive.

I think Huberman would have been glad to know that his gifted Stradivari has managed to survive too.

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Stephen, thank you for sharing this wonderful documentary. Huberman was one of the world's greatest violinists, but as the documentary points out he was more than just a violinist -- he was a great humanist: he believed that a united Europe was the solution to achieve world peace, he saved many lives before World War II by using his own money to bring persecuted Jewish musicians to Palestine to form the predecessor to the Israeli Philharmonic, and he did all in his power to fight Hitler. The documentary also ties Huberman together with Joshua Bell and philanthropist Sigmund Rogat -- I couldn't help but cry while watching various parts of the story.

 

It is a pity that in the 21st century not many people are knowledgeable about many of the great violinists who performed before the advent of high fidelity. Huberman was born in 1882 and passed away at a relatively young age in 1947, so his recordings that are available were made before the high fidelity era and soundwise they are not comparable to the recordings we have from violinists like Heifetz who were born later (in the case of Heifetz, only 20 years later in 1902) and who lived into the 1950s and beyond when high fidelity recordings came into their heyday.

 

The documentary refers to Huberman at age 9 playing the Brahms violin concerto with Brahms in the audience -- that would be around 1891. Books I have read, including The Great Violinists by Margaret Campbell, say that Huberman gave that performance in 1896 (a year before Brahms passed away) when Huberman would have been around 14 years of age. I wonder which are the correct facts.

 

FYI by coincidence I attended a recital by Midori in Toronto two days ago -- she plays the Huberman del Gesu which is on permanent loan to her. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could see Bell play the Huberman Strad and Midori play the Huberman del Gesu together on a stage one day and thus reunite Huberman's two famous instruments even if for just one performance?

 

 

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This film has been shown on PBS in the USA and is available on Netflix and DVD under the title "Orchestra of Exiles"

That actually is a different film, gowan.  Much of the same historical footage, but with some reenactment with actors and without the focus on Sigmund (can't remember his last name).  But it is the one to which I was referring and about which DBurns asked.

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Do you know the date of this performance, Peter?

 

No I don't. Just searching Youtube as the instrument is news right now. But he was really really good! (Better than Bell, sorry)

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Do you know the date of this performance, Peter?

 

Julian, I believe that this is the 1934 recording which Huberman made with the Vienna Philharmonic, George Szell conducting.

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