MikeC

MikeC's bench

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Thanks E.   I'm slow but getting there.  It's starting to be cold weather here,  I may break with 18th century methods and get a small space heater for the shop.  :D  

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 E.  Your work on the Sultana back looks great.   I'm going to get some cheap poplar to practice on before I start cutting that nice piece of maple for mine.  

I had some difficulty getting the linings bent for the C bouts.   Couldn't seem to get the shape right. I made a form by tracing the C bout on a 2x4 pine board to clamp the lining in while it dries.  While the lining is still damp and warm from bending it is flexible enough to clamp it into the form and when it's dry, it has the right shape.    

 

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10 hours ago, MikeC said:

Hi Jim,  look a few posts up you'll see the pegs through the holes and the strings tying them to hold the ribs in place while gluing.  Is that what you mean by lanyard tie?   

 

Duh!  Missed it while browsing with my phone.

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C bout linings glued in.  I made a homemade 1.8 mm chisel to cut the mortices for the linings.  There are some slight gaps here and there but not too bad considering it's my first time.   Those of you more experienced, do you leave the ribs on the form until ready to glue to the plates or take them off now?   

Edit:  Here's another photo of the gap between lining and rib.  This is the only place where there is a noticeable gap between lining and rib.  There are also some gaps between the end of the lining and the blocks.   (Last photo below)

 

LiningsGlued.JPG

corner1.JPG

corner2.JPG

corner3.JPG

corner4.JPG

gap.JPG

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Almost forgot.  Here using a block plane to cut the linings down flush with the ribs.  By looking through the top of the plane I can see whats being cut,  lining or rib or both.  Goal is to cut only the lining since the ribs are already where I want them..   The block plane is a little too big,  I need to get a finger plane.

 

planingLinings.JPG

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Nice work mike!  The pros can step in and contradict me if they like (then we'll both learn something).  The little gap between the lining and rib of the c-bout can easily be closed with some hot glue (I use a pallet knife for this) and a close pin or two.  I give extra finger pressure to the close pin if it doesn't close by itself right away.

I think your 110 block plane is fine.  Smaller and you might start following a curve.  You can always do a few strokes on sandpaper over a reference flat surface to make sure everything is flat and even.

-JIm

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I would leave the garland attached to the form until both plates are finished and ready to be attached to the form. You could release the garland from the form when the back plate is finished and ready but then you would not be able to trace around the finished blocks and linings on the top plate.  I've done it all three ways so the choice is yours but I think you will find what you prefer after you build a few more.  I wouldn't worry too much about the end gap.  

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I just have this urge to take it off the form but I know better and will have to exercise some patience.  The ADD in me want to hurry up and see what it looks like off the form lol.

The end gaps shouldn't matter.  The linings will still perform their function of stiffening the thin ribs and providing gluing surface for the plates.  There are actually two small spots where there is a slight gap in the rib and lining but they are so small and with good solid glue on either side, there is no flexibility so I can't close them.  The closeup photos make them look bigger than they are.   Also in one of the previous post photos you may see a crack on a C bout rib on the inside.  It doesn't go all the way through and the lining covers it.   The photo here shows a slight defect in the rib, a dark spot and sort of a hole that didn't close all the way.    I didn't think it would be necessary to put rubber bands on the closthes pin clamps and for the most part that seemed to work pretty well.

 

 

  

gap1.JPG

gap2.JPG

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And new toys to play with,  well they are not exactly new, probably date around mid 1800s.    Hand planes are about 16 inches long.  That other thing is a miter box.

 

hand planes.jpg

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One thing I do if I need a mini pallet knife is to unbend and flatten the end of a paper clip. They can be hammered very thin and will fit into open gaps like the ones on your ribs. Heat them up and use a little hot water and then reclamp the lining, the glue that was already applied will reactivate. Also preheat that area of rib with a  hair dryer before applying the water. 

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