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violin neck heel


violins88
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Edit: I should add, this method makes the desired button shape determine the neck heel dimensions, rather than the button being a product of the neck heel dimensions.

Why choose between one or the other, or make it a two-step process when it can be one?

Once the neck is glued in, you can shape and trim the button and the heel at the same time.

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Why choose between one or the other, or make it a two-step process when it can be one?

Once the neck is glued in, you can shape and trim the button and the heel at the same time.

Good point David! ;)   A very 'common sense' approach! B)

 

Oh and what tool would you recommend using for this job??? :huh:

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sawzalltool.jpg

 

Or would you consider this tool to be too underpowered for this job? :wacko::unsure::blink::rolleyes::o:P:D

 

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To get back to John's original question about the shape of the knife used.  I've used a straight 1 inch chisel to do this job for years.  I use this chisel for a lot of things.  I keep it laying on my bench so it's easy to get at.  I often use it in place of knives.  A couple of reasons.  One is it's fast and easy to get razor sharp.  Sense it's a straight edge, I just put it in a chisel/plane iron holder and run the edge back and forth on my stone and it's perfect every time.  The second reason is I just like the way it feels in my hand.  It's kind of short so the cutting edge isn't far from handle.  Easy to control.  I don't know if this is right or wrong, but it ain't wrong for me.

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Why choose between one or the other, or make it a two-step process when it can be one?

Once the neck is glued in, you can shape and trim the button and the heel at the same time.

 

Hi David

 

One point of merit to your method, surely faster.

But unfortunately I got into the habit of recording the weight and tap tones of the free neck, I can't go back.... <_<

I will stay on the slower but "safer" side of my system.......

 

Davide

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Incidentally, Roy seems to finish the heel first, but Courtnall/Johnson don't. So there are obviously different ways to shear sheep. I don't believe either of these books give reasons for their approach.

If it can be pinned down, how much time can be saved, all things being equal? I'm happy to try it if I can save time without ineptly plowing my rasp into a rib.

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Different stokes for different folks, but why not plot your desired button shape on the button (of all things :o ), and make a continuous cut into the heel?

That's working under the assumption the base of the heel where it meets the button was pre-cut to exactly the right width to match the desired button width. The way I see it, the two wind up being the closest of friends, so planning them out has to be done together.

 

Edit:After giving this some thought, I overlooked the fact that most people here are assembling the neck onto a finished, closed box  in the conventional manner.  Because I assemble the back as the final step, this explains why some pre-planning of the heel width and button shape is required.

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When I get up in the morning, I always put my underpants on first, then my trousers on afterwards. I suppose it's a free country, and none of my business should you prefer to do things the other way around

 

Seems to work for Superman.  But wait, isn't he the arch enemy of Lex Luthier? 

(Sorry, couldn't resist.)

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I put the neck in with the heel square, and the neck roughed down with two big chamfers. Then I draw on the button, mark the sides of the heel, and holding the fiddle in my fingerboard holder, saw out the heel shape with my coping saw. I trim the heel with a long slim knife that I often use for f holes.

 

I like the glueing surface on the heel to be long and oversized, because that way I can adjust the final fit to the button more easily with my block plane. Also, any glue that will have soaked in to the endgrain will be cut away, and won't leave a stain.

 

I bring my cello necks much closer to the finish before I put them in.

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Had you said something along the lines of, "That's how I leaned, so that's what I'm comfortable with", I would have understood that much better.

 

Sorry for my bad english.

I meant that I learned with a method like yours at the school, I worked a few year in that way, than I changed my approach and now I feel good (more confortable) with my new method.

Of course not invented by me, just adapted the technique of the restorers, or at least I think I did this (I am not a restorer......) :rolleyes:

 

Davide

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