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violin neck heel


violins88
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I think the big problem in the first video is the heel (and neck) should be much closer to finish before gluing in the neck.  Check out the other Sora video and you can see that his neck is essentially finished before his trims the button.  —MO

 

Mine are much rougher than that when I glue them in. Pretty much rectangular all the way to the beginning of the pegbox. I place the fingerboard against the side of the bench, and start by going at the corners on the squared-off button and heel with a flat chisel. Having the violin attached gives a lot more to hold on to, and greater stability..

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Mine are much rougher than that when I glue them in. Pretty much rectangular all the way to the beginning of the pegbox. I place the fingerboard against the side of the bench, and start by going at the corners on the squared-off button and heel with a flat chisel. Having the violin attached gives a lot more to hold on to, and greater stability..

 

I make the neck 100% finished BEFORE I glue it in. It is easy to grip the end of the fingerboard tight, as in a vice, between 2 Michelin rings of stomach fat, so that one has two hands free to work (trick learnt from Roger)
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Mine are much rougher than that when I glue them in. Pretty much rectangular all the way to the beginning of the pegbox. I place the fingerboard against the side of the bench, and start by going at the corners on the squared-off button and heel with a flat chisel. Having the violin attached gives a lot more to hold on to, and greater stability..

David,

 

I am glad you posted that because, after watching his video of the neck heel, I had thought all trained violin makers finished the heel and THEN installed it in the body. I have been doing it your way.

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I make the neck 100% finished BEFORE I glue it in. It is easy to grip the end of the fingerboard tight, as in a vice, between 2 Michelin rings of stomach fat, so that one has two hands free to work (trick learnt from Roger)

 

How should one do it if they are shaped more like the Pillsbury Doughboy, and aren't blessed with a "clutching tummy"?

 

pillsbury_doughboy.jpg

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When I get up in the morning, I always put my underpants on first, then my trousers on afterwards. I suppose it's a free country, and none of my business should you prefer to do things the other way around

 

You are missing something...before you put your underpants on it is pretty apparent you check your score on Maestronet

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When I get up in the morning, I always put my underpants on first, then my trousers on afterwards.

 

If you slept in your underpants, you'd have other options. ;)

 

 

You are missing something...before you put your underpants on it is pretty apparent you check your score on Maestronet

 

Jacob, is that true? Have you been posting barenaked?  :o

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I like to completely finish the button on the back, completely finish the neck except for leaving the heel in an oversize semi-finished state. Lastly after the back is glued on, I do the final trimming of the neck heel to match the button using one of John's excellent knives and a scraper.

 

Edit: I should add, this method makes the desired button shape determine the neck heel dimensions, rather than the button being a product of the neck heel dimensions.

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 after watching his video of the neck heel, I had thought all trained violin makers finished the heel and THEN installed it in the body. I have been doing it your way.

 

I would like to emphasize that my videos show my methods of work, not THE method and probably not the best for everyone.

I simply feel more confortable in this way, after some years learning and working in a more conventional way as David Burgess does.

I think that his method is the most popular among violin makers, not mine that is more related to restoration.

 

Davide

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