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Florian Schneidt's bench


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Thanks guys!

Let's hope other bowmakers get interested to post as well. It might be that photographing is the obstacle, it's not easy to get that right, due to reflecting surfaces and magnification...

@Christopher: that's me. Hope to see you next year again!

@Manfio: any of your instruments in the Netherlands? If so, Pm me please!

Florian

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Hi Lusitano,

The quality of pernambuco is good but not exceptional. The most exciting feature is a hefty figuration about one third into the stick, stable and strong. I wanted that stick together with the mammoth frog because of its light colour. Unfortunately it darkened more with the finish than I expected.

My dream would have been to sell it to a very extrovert blonde violinist, probably not going to happen...

By the way, we are both in Europe, so prices will definitely not knock down anyone, except for the most naive eBay scavengers...

Florian

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Very nice indeed Florian.  I'd like to see more bowmakers here also.  I agree that the photography is a bit tricky.  Right now  I am just holding bows in my left hand while I take the picture with the right, then I photoshop out the background.  It works for a small number of pictures but would not be good for large volume.  Jerry Pasciewicz just posted a very clever picture of his photo set up which I would like to copy.

 

Will you be at the VSA convention?  I hope to be there - maybe to show something at the 'show and tell' session.

 

Ed

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Hi Lusitano,

The quality of pernambuco is good but not exceptional. The most exciting feature is a hefty figuration about one third into the stick, stable and strong. I wanted that stick together with the mammoth frog because of its light colour. Unfortunately it darkened more with the finish than I expected.

My dream would have been to sell it to a very extrovert blonde violinist, probably not going to happen...

By the way, we are both in Europe, so prices will definitely not knock down anyone, except for the most naive eBay scavengers...

Florian

 

I may no longer have blond hair (that went dark brown with age and is now going grey) but I am the pinnacle of extravert LOL Personality has never been a weak point of mine so I believe I'm semi what you are looking for LOL

 

I'll PM you, exquisite or not the fact the stick looks like the figure isn't stationary (I can see what looks like obvious glitz) really is extremely pleasant! Have you experimented with frog design? I'm looking to cut away from the norm in terms of bows lol

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Hi Ed,

Thanks for the comment, I will try more with photographing, but my skills with photoshopping are poor and I'm not terribly keen on spending a lot of time on it.

I will not be at the VSA convention, it's a bit out of my way (I live in the Netherlands).

I'd love to get this place a bit more lively with bowmakers, so how about showing us your pictures?

Florian

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  • 2 weeks later...

Very nice, deep glow, I'm sorry I can't get that into the pictures.

 

In the first photo the wood looks like it is way off quartersawn - grain almost running vertically.  Is that correct?

 

Beautiful head in Photo 3 (? bit of a step in the transition of the lower curve behind the head to the stick).

 

-------

In case you are unaware - I known little.

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Janito, yes there is a small step, as in many peccatte style bows. I believe it's by the method they are made, stick finished, front done, throat last.... and I believe it helps a good sound.

The grain is not vertical, at least not in the top half of the head (edited), there must have been a knot in the vicinity of the head, that turned orientation grain in the lower part of the head. It's stable, by the way the head is pretty solid anyway....

Florian

 

Thanks all!

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Many good bows arent cut on the quarter they are usually at varying angles often to one side or another. One maker who writes interesting articles believes they are often made purposely this way for strength due to the player nature of leaning the bow into the strings. opposite ways for cello and violins.

Ive seen successful bows made with grain direction  all over the place.

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 [1] > One maker who writes interesting articles believes they are often made purposely this way for strength due to the player nature of leaning the bow into the strings. opposite ways for cello and violins.

 

[2] > Ive seen successful bows made with grain direction  all over the place.

 

 [1] sounds like a marketing ploy to make use of the planks that were sawn off quarter (which most are).

 

[2] Agree

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I dont think its a marketing ploy as it does make sense. Ive lost count of the amount of old French bows ive had where the grain is 30degrees or more off quarter. The ideal is more like 10 degrees. But its entirely up to the maker what he thinks.

Heres a link to the article by Andreas Grutter, its a good read ,its under the part about wood

http://www.andreasgrutter.nl/bow-couch/bow-couch.html

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Many good bows arent cut on the quarter they are usually at varying angles often to one side or another. One maker who writes interesting articles believes they are often made purposely this way for strength due to the player nature of leaning the bow into the strings. opposite ways for cello and violins.

Ive seen successful bows made with grain direction  all over the place.

But how would that be related to Lucchi meter speed which, if I understand (correctly?) seems to be saying that the straighter the grain, the faster the response?

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Vathek, you are right, the lucchi is related for a big part to the length and straightness of grain in the stick, but we are now talking about the orientation of annual rings and medullary rays....

 

May I please assure you all that my bow picture is quarterly sawn? If you look at fiddlecollector's last picture you can notice that the annual rings change orientation slightly within the head. That's the case in my bow as well, but more extreme.

 

Please have a look as well (if possible) at Paul Childs book on Peccatte's, look at bow nr 31. Completely plain sawn and regularly in my hands, is the 'war horse' of strong player, looks good, will last for some more time.

 

On the subject of orientation of annual rings. Yes, most bows annual rings are not completely horizontal but slanted either way. I do stick to the rules and use the one for violin/viola and the other for cello (because thats tilted the other way), but I don't honestly know if it matters: If it survives the proces of making everything is alright  and the head is strong(I plane the stick pushing the head onto a board, so that I don't have to hold).

If the stick is dropped while playing and it falls onto its head on a hard surface it will brake, no matter what rings orientation...

 

Florian

 

Edited: errors in using plain and quarterly sawn

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