Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Don Noon's bench


Don Noon

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Replies 1k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

post-25192-0-30088500-1429810689_thumb.jpg

 

'Tis a thing of beauty... except perhaps for those pitch canyons.  We'll see how well I can patch them up.

 

This is going on my "whacky wood" Guarneri model, where I'll use up some of my more "interesting" pieces.  Functionally it should be fine, and visually attractive... although it might be in the way that a freakshow is attractive.

 

The other of the two concurrent builds will be a very conservative-looking Strad model.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

attachicon.gif150423.JPG

 

'Tis a thing of beauty... except perhaps for those pitch canyons.  We'll see how well I can patch them up.

 

This is going on my "whacky wood" Guarneri model, where I'll use up some of my more "interesting" pieces.  Functionally it should be fine, and visually attractive... although it might be in the way that a freakshow is attractive.

 

The other of the two concurrent builds will be a very conservative-looking Strad model.

Reminds me of snake eyes.  This could be the snake fiddle's sequal. :D   I bought a spruce billet a couple of years ago at auction with a huge pitch canyon close enough to the center where I could cut it out, and wide enough to use the cut out for a couple of bass bars.  It's very ringy.  I don't know if that's good or bad, but I'll hold onto it until I'm a little higher up on the learning curve.

 

-Jim

post-58064-0-59970700-1429875932_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Over the weekend I visited a retiring amateur maker who was interested in selling off a stash of 25 year old European wood.  I mostly loaded up on cello neck blocks, but picked up some violin tops as well.  

post-25192-0-88164800-1430194028_thumb.jpg

The cello neck blocks were each big enough to get 2 sets of violin backs, plus some necks and ribs.  So, after 2 days of creative resawing, I now have doubled my inventory of Euro maple.  Sure made a lot of sawdust.

post-25192-0-31770500-1430194030_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After flattening the jointed plates for my next 2 fiddles using a fairly crappy old block plane, my crappy old wrists complained mightily for the next day.  My 6" power jointer is too small for the job, and upscaling to a larger machine is not only economically unjustifiable, but I don't have the space for it.  What to do...

 

After a bit of research, I ordered one of these, with a spare high-angle blade.  I can find room for it, and while expensive, is much cheaper than the $5000 power jointer I'd really want.

post-25192-0-30586900-1430356685_thumb.jpg

 

While the primary need is for something to flatten plates (after joining), I'm certainly going to test it out on jointing too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is deja vu for me. I won't bore everyone with my experience: I refurbished a Pakistani-made No. 7 plane with a thicker blade, better chip breaker, resurfaced the bottom, and other enhancements. That was a lot of work.

 

We all know that the most important test is holding the planed plates together and in a darkened room look at a light across the room. Everyone scoffs that they know this, but at the Indianapolis  VSA I saw some seam lines.  :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I refurbished a Pakistani-made No. 7 plane with a thicker blade, better chip breaker, resurfaced the bottom, and other enhancements. That was a lot of work.

 

I have an old #7 plane, too... but even with a lot of work, it would still be a sloppy piece of junk.

 

I really don't need anything other than my power jointer to make a good, tight center joint on my plates.  If you want to talk about work, then what I put into that jointer would likely be equivalent to buying a couple of L-N planes.  Definitely not a decision based on efficiency.

 

Anyway, as I stated, the immediate need was for planing the flat side of the joined plates.  A jointer plane would be unwieldy, and this seemed like a good excuse to get a really nice, all-around plane that could do many things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Peter, I think I'll stick with my choice of the Lie-Nielsen.  You can't find much better quality.  They might be pricey, but they hold their resale value ridiculously well (I know... I tried looking for a used one).

 

Ernie, glad to hear someone else likes it.  I have a L-N #102 which is fabulous for doing detail work, but no "go-to" plane for larger scale... only frustratingly sloppy junk planes.  Nice peg shaver... I'd probably consider doing that if I didn't have my lathe dedicated to peg cutting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

post-25192-0-44465000-1431102461_thumb.jpg

 

Trying out a new ground.  The two garlands are made from the same block of wood, so the only difference is the ground.

 

The ground is two steps:

First, a thin resin/solvent/dye is applied, which penetrates the wood.  The trick is to get the right color in the right amount so it doesn't burn the flames.

Over that, a very thick paste... mostly clear or amber varnish-ish stuff thickened with fumed silica, mostly wiped off.

 

I notice that there is a bit of ghosting (not a full ghost, but a ghost of a ghost) at the edges where the linings are attached.  The glue didn't go thru the rib, and I didn't get any glue on the surface, but still something is reducing the penetration there.  It also happens at the end blocks and corners, slightly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Backs and sides to my twin fiddle build are done, and the external arching is getting close.

 

Time to patch the pitch pits...

post-25192-0-91988200-1432775870_thumb.jpg

There's a really wide, hard grain line adjacent to the pit, as well as some ugliness at the ends of the pit, so I cut out all that stuff

post-25192-0-97937200-1432775873_thumb.jpg

From the  plate offcuts, I sawed out some plugs, filing them to fit, with a slight taper to make sure the outside surface fit best

post-25192-0-50021000-1432775875_thumb.jpg

I thought to myself:  "Don't jam these suckers in there too hard, 'cuz there's not too much wood at each end of the gap and you'd split the plate."

Then when I got the glue on everything, the thought evaporated...

D'OH!

post-25192-0-83304800-1432775878_thumb.jpg

Not a big deal, though... clean break, some glue, and it's pretty much gone.

post-25192-0-39682700-1432775883_thumb.jpg

The patches are a slightly different shade, most likely because you're looking at freshly trimmed wood there, while the plate surfaces have been exposed to air and sun (to dry out the glue of the repair).  They should match a bit better soon, but certainly won't be invisible, as it is impossible to do grain matching with that hole.

 

If you value your time, this kind of salvage work probably isn't worth it.  But I can't stand to see an otherwise nice piece of wood go to waste.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This top needed another patch; not due to a pitch pit, but the figured grain created a weak spot where the wood just fell out.  I carried the patch up to where the grain squiggled visibly, in order to make the crossgrain cut a little less noticeable.

post-25192-0-52782200-1433445341_thumb.jpgpost-25192-0-82871500-1433445342_thumb.jpgpost-25192-0-98466100-1433445343_thumb.jpg

 

The two tops (one Euro, Guarneri model and one Engelmann, Strad model) came out almost identical as far as weight and taptones.  It will be interesting to see how similar they sound.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...