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Don Noon

Don Noon's bench

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Unless you are making monster sized violas..there are cases that adjust for size. I think mine adjusts from 15" - 16.5". I would have to check though.

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The size isn't quite the issue, and my case is "adjustable"... but it's a compromise for the perfect suspension fit, especially in the lower-priced ones.  In this particular case, the puffy daSalo model didn't agree with the bow clip, so even though the bow clip had extra padding, it put pressure on the top when (apparently) dropped upside down.

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There was a thread in the Pegbox with this link, but I'll add it here too.  Annelle K Gregory winning $52,500 for her first place in the Sphinx competition 2017, using my #21 violin (just under 6 months old).  

 

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This is excellent Sibilius and excellent violin. Sibilius is usually all over the place, but I like this one. Right on it and not someone "trying to understand it better". I have read a lot about Sibelius and its difficult for others (than Finns) )to understand whats going on.

I guess the best way is to read the notes - and play. 

(Gitlis has some own interpretations that makes sense to me, even if they are off)

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A few things going on in the shop...

-Re-varnishing a previous violin (#20) after carving a new top.  It wasn't really bad, just not good enough.  And I didn't like the varnish.  This is the first real test of my new iron rosinate varnish, and so far I like it a lot.  I did have to add some Gilsonite to mellow out the bright redness of the iron rosinate.  This is pre-antiqued, so there's still a lot of work left.

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Sometimes it's good to have a huge bandsaw.  With some precision resawing, I managed to slice two 1-pc backs and get two free ones.  

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The new processing chamber is nearing full operation.  Dry-run test easily achieved stable, even temperature, so there are just a few minor plumbing issues to attend to.

And finally, the waiting list is growing.  I just need to make a lot more now.

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One of the case makers should develop a very small form-fitting reinforced case, suspension inside, whatever it takes, which could be packed inside a regular suitcase with clothing around it.  Then check that and the empty regular case into the plane baggage.  No more knock down drag outs with stewardesses.

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I like the color on #20.  I like more red in violins than most I think.  Although it could just be the cataracts making my world more dull.  My preference for strong reds may change when my insurance company agrees it's time to fix my eyes. :D Nice varnish!

-Jim

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Fabulous playing on an beautiful looking and sounding violin. Congratulations and thanks for all the knowledge you have shared over the years.

 

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It seems like a lot has gone on this month.

I finally got my bigger chamber insulated, plumbed, and running.

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I managed to cook up 2 batches of maple (enough for ~3 years at my slow pace) before the lid seal disintegrated.  It wasn't really meant for this kind of punishment, although the chamber itself is rated for it.

I learned a few things from my previous chamber, and this one has better insulation, more uniform heating, and works great (or it will again, when I make a new seal).  Results are what I want... darker, but not too dark.  It's too early to tell about the properties, as it will take several weeks to stabilize, but I'm sure it will be fine.  Besides, this is just the maple anyway.  A processed slab is on the right, and an unprocessed one (not the same log, but similar) is on the left.  I can do 1-pc backs now.

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#20 is re-done with a new top and re-varnished with new iron rosinate and Gilsonite varnish.  It's infinitely better, my favorite so far (I always say that, I know).  

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And now to start on the next group... G Strad, Enlarged Guarneri, and P Strad.  That should take care of this year.

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Just a public thanks to Dontonio Noonarius for the fine violin he kindly allowed me to buy.  Now if we can the house back together and sell it (and load up, move to Beverly, unload, etc.) I will get back to practicing more.

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Here's the 13-year-old owner of my last viola.  Quite a talent, I think.  Can't wait to hear her in a large hall.  This viola was made for the odd purpose of being a solo viola... power and projection.  Might not be what you'd want for a quartet.

 

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Back length is 400mm.

This top was very low density European, .33 originally and .31 after processing.  The plate weighed 74.6g, or 80.6g with the bass bar unvarnished.

It is very even and unwolfy, as I think you can tell by the recording.  Due to the light weight and high radiation ratio, it is very loud, snappy and projecting, not every violist's preference, but might be best suited to the rare case of a soloist violist rather than quartet.

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3 hours ago, Don Noon said:

Back length is 400mm.

This top was very low density European, .33 originally and .31 after processing.  The plate weighed 74.6g, or 80.6g with the bass bar unvarnished.

It is very even and unwolfy, as I think you can tell by the recording.  Due to the light weight and high radiation ratio, it is very loud, snappy and projecting, not every violist's preference, but might be best suited to the rare case of a soloist violist rather than quartet.

Thanks for that info Don. If I may ask, what density and weights did you use for the back wood?  I think Anne is marvelous...and fearless : )

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8 minutes ago, lpr5184 said:

what density and weights did you use for the back wood?

.53 density European (after processing), 130.6 grams.

By the way... the big-ish scroll was even lower density, as I recall... thus the reason for splicing on a higher density neck and using peg bushings.

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5 minutes ago, Don Noon said:

.53 density European (after processing), 130.6 grams.

By the way... the big-ish scroll was even lower density, as I recall... thus the reason for splicing on a higher density neck and using peg bushings.

OK so it sounds like you matched light to light which is close to what I'm doing.  Interesting point on the scroll and something I never really experimented with is the effect of the weight of the scroll and neck. I'm contemplating using torrefied hard maple for the neck and scroll on my viola. I haven't measured density yet. What are your thoughts about that?

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