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Cracked varnish colour matching?


Irishfiddler
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Jeff W. is correct, of course... What I feel workshops do in general, and Oberlin offers in particular, is to give participants and opportunity to have access to fine restorers (with this experience) as well as to interact with others sharing ideas and experiences.  "Everyone teaches, everyone learns."

 

The workshop there is only a week long, but is packed with good stuff one can carry away.  Personally, I have never left the workshop without several new techniques, new materials, or new approaches picked up from both the guest instructors David and I arrange, and from participants.  I'd say it really takes the rest of the year to absorb the information and put these methods into practice.

 

Another advantage to attending these workshops is that one is exposed to the upper end of what's possible.  Again, personally speaking, this kind of exposure has had a profound effect on my own work over the years... nothing like seeing a truly fantastic job to inspire one to "raise the bar" on your own bench.

 

Touchup is always a subject of interest in Oberlin.  It's discussed in group sessions, and applied in individual cases.

 

Isn't advertising strictly against Forum rules? :)

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The riffraff they let into that workshop... :D

 

Yeah...  I just saw your smiling face on the violin making workshop video.  Motley crew, for sure!   :)  (for anyone interested, it's on the VSA website).

 

Another direct question...is it open to anyone or a limited clientele? Does one have to had attended a violinmaking school?

 

No.  Admission is not limited by schooling.  What we try to do is get a balanced "mix" of experience within the workshop.  The mix ends up with some serious restorers, shop owners, makers who repair and a student or two from the schools.  Besides the instructors attention, those with more experience, or those who have attended multiple times, tend to help those who are new or have less experience.  I'll be happy to explain further off the board.  If you hit the Oberlin Workshop link below my signature, it will take you to a workshop page...  and the email I use for application is listed there.

 

Maybe others who have attended will comment as well.

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The riffraff they let into that workshop... :D

Yes, perhaps riffraff - but it is a wonderful blend of riffraff. I'm proud to consider myself apart of it. For myself it has been a tremendous opportunity. I began working in the industry at age 15, I'm 33 now. It's not what I set out to do with my life, but it's where I ended up. Fortunately, I discovered over time that I liked it and had an aptitude for it. Oberlin restoration has allowed me to fill in holes in my abilities. Some of which I didn't even know I had. It's very refreshing to have someone stand over your shoulder pointing out what you can do better. Yes, it is a varied mix of people. That is one of the things that makes it special. I've found myself over the last two years of the program helping out attendees who don't have as much experience. Nothing sharpens skills faster than having to demonstrate them with multiple people watching - You learn a tremendous amount that way.

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BTW: For those attending the Baltimore VSA meeting next month, Jerry and a small crew he's arranged will be in charge of the interactive presentation on the Oberlin instrument restoration workshop.  Not sure how much touchup they'll get into, but I believe they will cover crack cleaning methods including the use of a microscope & relatively new materials, building up splintered under edges (glue surfaces), tower cleats and wedges, arch correction without the use of a cast, and some other fun stuff.

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Awesome. I love the resources available to me through the VSA.

It really is impressive, that the hope for better standards in the industry leads folk like you, Jeffrey,  and Maestrowicz to share openly what would have amounted to job security for your shop a few decades ago. I am excited to see how our business is evolving.

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BTW: For those attending the Baltimore VSA meeting next month, Jerry and a small crew he's arranged will be in charge of the interactive presentation on the Oberlin instrument restoration workshop.  Not sure how much touchup they'll get into, but I believe they will cover crack cleaning methods including the use of a microscope & relatively new materials, building up splintered under edges (glue surfaces), tower cleats and wedges, arch correction without the use of a cast, and some other fun stuff.

Thanks for the plug Jeff!

 

There will be two sessions at the convention that include Oberlin Restoration participants.  On friday myself, Sharon Que and Pablo Alfaro will be covering covering things that deal with crack cleaning, gluing and reinforcement.  I'll be presenting and demoing Laponite and Triton x-100, Sharon will be doing the same with tower cleats, and Pablo will be discussing pegbox splits and demonstrating the installation of a carbon fiber ring. 

 

On Saturday there will be a session called "Restoration Techniques."  It will feature myself, Ryan Mclaughlin and Cameron Robertson.  Ryan and i will be discussing and demoing crack cleaning with a microscope, I'll be showing a nifty way to build up an under edge, and Cameron and I will be pouring a cast.  

 

Both one hour sessions are going to be packed with a lot of good tips and tricks.

 

Retouching will not be covered - however, if someone wishes to speak with me about it one on one I'd be more than happy to discuss it.

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 Nothing sharpens skills faster than having to demonstrate them with multiple people watching - 

Especially after 3 beers with dinner and a careful eye out for the doorway to see if Jeffrey H. walks through...........o well, he eventually got the soundpost fit  :P

I will admit that I learn alot from Jerry's mini demo's, though I do notice he squirms through most of it, but still goes there, thanks Jerry.  jeff

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Especially after 3 beers with dinner and a careful eye out for the doorway to see if Jeffrey H. walks through...........o well, he eventually got the soundpost fit :P

I will admit that I learn alot from Jerry's mini demo's, though I do notice he squirms through most of it, but still goes there, thanks Jerry. jeff

Ha! Thanks Jeff W. Like I said, nothing sharpens your skills faster than doing them infront of people. Demonstrating sound post fitting after a few beers was probably not my brightest idea, but it seemed so at the time... That Rick Hyslop is a trouble maker. I like to think I know JH well enough to know what what he likes and what he'll brow beat me into changing later (he's always right in doing so) At the time I was unsure about he he felt about using my light on the inside of the fiddle. I certainly don't want to give the wrong impression about Jeff. To his credit he's a fabulous teacher. David is as well.
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Maybe another thread for this would be better?  Because none of this helps at all with varnish types? 

Sorry for going AWOL.  Are you asking which type of touch up varnish to use, depending on the type of varnish on the instrument?  If so, that has been answered, and that is to use spirit varnish in all cases.  Look back through the posts and you will see why.  If I misunderstood, then what do you mean " Because none of this helps at all with varnish types?"  jeff

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I'm wondering if anyone knows what kind of varnish was on the original from these photos?  It looks quit red and is black in some areas where it has been heavily damaged.  I'd like to try and create an old feel to the violin close to the feel of the most undamaged parts in the middle.

 

 

No its not just a simple touch up because the varnish is built up in some areas and almost warn off in others.  It seems like the varnish has been applied in a way that it is much heavier than it should be,  almost like some one painted fence emulsion on it.  Thats why I decided to remove it because it just looks nasty.  My question was would it be possible to create the type of colour that was originally on the violin?  The varnish is defiantly not spirit because it took a lot of work to remove it than just applying turpentine and letting it desolve.   

 

Then some one asked

 

 

If it 's been to Oberlein for show and tell is it possible to learn this craft, art  or science whatever it is called in an eviroment of study? Or is it a lifetime of knowledge failure and tricks of the trade that is being discussed? 

 

 

Which I think would be better to answer in another topic because this seems to going off on a tangent. 

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1) The varnish is defiantly not spirit because it took a lot of work to remove it than just applying turpentine and letting it desolve.   

 

2) Which I think would be better to answer in another topic because this seems to going off on a tangent. 

 

1) It may or may not be spirit based... and could be spirit based with oil added (suspended) or an emulsion varnish.  Especially from a photo, who knows?  

 

Alcohol is the solvent in which resins are dissolved in a spirit based varnish (not turpentine), but some resins can change over time and may or may not be soluble with the original solvent later on.  Orange shellac is a bear after a few decades. To add the the confusion, some oil based varnish can be easily softened with alcohol.

 

2) Happens on discussion boards.  I think you've received many useful suggestions... including that the original finish may have been repairable, though I agree it would not have been simple.

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