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Absilon

Any thoughts on using Old Brown Glue (Liquid Hide Glue)

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Hi,

 

Just joined this awesome forum the other day and this is my first post.

Any thoughts on using Old Brown Glue (Liquid Hide Glue) vs. traditional hot hide glue.

My research shows that it is basically hide glue with urea added to it.

I have also read that it is much better then Tighbond liqiuid hide glue.

I'm wondering what some of the more experianced members here think about this glue.

 

Thanks in advance for your advice and opinions.

 

Best regards.

 

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Never heard of it.

 

Edit: Just looked it up. May be OK, but you can make your own a LOT cheaper with whatever gel time you like. Table salt works as well or better than urea. I've done that but normally just use the unadulterated stuff, which does not have a shelf life in the dry state.

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I have also read that it is much better then Tighbond liqiuid hide glue.

.

Welcome to the forum :)   "Tightbond hide glue"  manages to tell 2 lies in 3 words.  "Bondless Hide Goo" is more like it.  It can't be trusted, especially for necks and blocks. The stuff you cite, even if it's better, seems pointless to me because regular hide glue is cheap and surprisingly easy to use.  Put equal amounts granulated hide glue and water in a coffee cup.  It will plump up within half an hour and absorb all the water.  Then heat it up still in the cup in a pot of hot water on a stove until it's very fluid and apply it with a hypodermic syringe kept warm by sticking it in the hot water occasionally.  Use the hot water to clean the syringe out afterwards..

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I think the liquid hide glue does not release as well as hot hide glue, so I wouldn't use it for stuff like gluing a top on or anything else that needs to be reversible. I haven't used much of it before, so I don't know if the urea would affect a joint.

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Then heat it up still in the cup in a pot of hot water on a stove until it's very fluid and apply it with a hypodermic syringe kept warm by sticking it in the hot water occasionally. Use the hot water to clean the syringe out afterwards..

I think a syringe is handy for some things but it might make the process of using hot hide glue sound too technical for a new person. A glue brush might sound easier.

Hot hide glue is pretty simple once you do it. One thing to keep in mind though is to not heat the glue too much because that will ruin it's bonding capabilities. Make the water bath uncomfortably hot, but not unbearable. Buying a package from a place like woodcraft would be good because they will probably have some instructions on the package.

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Absilon, so, I hope you got the point.  Most all said not to use it.  I would agree.  I have never heard of that brand, the the other liquid hide is so bad that it's not worth the risk.  A real problem with the titebond liquid hide glue is that humidity will ruin the bond.  Just dont take the chance.  Get a tiny mini single serving crockpot at your local goodwill (I see them all the time), and use that for the warm water bath.  They are just big enough for a baby food jar with the glue in it.  They are a little low in temp, but enough to start with.    jeff

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Never heard of it.

 

Edit: Just looked it up. May be OK, but you can make your own a LOT cheaper with whatever gel time you like. Table salt works as well or better than urea. I've done that but normally just use the unadulterated stuff, which does not have a shelf life in the dry state.

So, proportionally, how much salt would you begin adding to slow the drying time?

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I saw an amateur pieced-together fiddle that had the neck set with bottled Titebond hide glue. The glue had liquified and the neck pulled loose.

 

Dont use it.

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I use a proportion of 1 part glue to 2 parts water (by volume)

There is no advantage to using bottled glue and once you've used bad glue you will realize that the only thing holding your

violin together is glue!

Baby bottle warmers are also a good choice for the workshop. They can be found at thrift stores, ebay and Walmart. I like the oneswith a thermostatic dial so I can keep water a little warm and heat it up very quickly when I need it.

Oded

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Thanks to everyone for all the very helpful advice, I appreciate it very much.  I have just ordered one pound of dry hide glue and will go to Walmart after work to check out the baby bottle warmers. Is there a specific temperature the glue needs to be warmed up to?

 

I'm new to working on violins but have done some work on guitars and mandolins in the past. I usually learn pretty quickly especially if it is something I'm passionate about. Bought several cheap violins with various issues that I can practice on and having a lot of fun learning.

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So, proportionally, how much salt would you begin adding to slow the drying time?

None.

Salt causes it absorb more moisture than it would otherwise. Under high humidity conditions, it will re-liquify, similar to what the urea-retarded glue does.

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None.

Salt causes it absorb more moisture than it would otherwise. Under high humidity conditions, it will re-liquify, similar to what the urea-retarded glue does.

Sure will, if you grossly overdo it. I seldom do that and only add enough, by trial and error, to extend the gel time for the situation at hand. I've never had a joint failure as a result. I tried the Franklin stuff years ago. Once. Disaster.

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