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JSully

Pianists to listen to?

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I recently bought Hj Lim playing all the Beethoven piano sonatas because they were on sale for $4.99 or something a while back on iTunes.

 

I'm really enjoying them(especially #21), but I've got no idea who I should look for when buying more piano recordings.  

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks!

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I genuinely love the playing of Glenn Gould. His sense of color, articulation, phrasing is always a revelation. His playing is definitely intense constantly calling out for you to pay attention. There is not a note that passes that has not been cut and polishes by him. Some people find this overpowering. He reminds me of Heifetz. My wife can't stand him. Get his recording of J S Bach's French Suites or Brahms Ballades.

Artur Rubenstein. Anything

Sorry I'm a soft touch for the old timers.

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I recently bought Hj Lim playing all the Beethoven piano sonatas because they were on sale for $4.99 or something a while back on iTunes.

 

I'm really enjoying them(especially #21), but I've got no idea who I should look for when buying more piano recordings.  

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks!

Where is everybody? Does nobody listen to pianists?

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There are so many great pianists, and I agree with your suggestions. One of the things that impresses me most about Rubinstein is his skill as a collaborator, and his obvious love of chamber music. His recordings with Henryk Szeryng are among my favorites, and his work with the Guarneri quartet is wonderful.

 

I agree with your recommendations about Gould: I am particularly fond of his treatment of Bach's Italian Concerto and cherish his autumnal revisitation of the Goldberg Variations shortly before his death--that is one of my desert island discs.

 

A personal favorite of mine is Wilhelm Kempff, and his complete Beethoven Sonatas is another must-own. He is so thoughtful, so intimate, and so warm--with a depth of humanity that matches Beethoven's. Again, a wonderful collaborator--Kempff's complete Beethoven piano trios with Szeryng and Fournier is as good as any. And his Bach is also exceptional, particularly his Well-Tempered Clavier and Goldberg Variations (the first LP I ever purchased! Quite special to me!).

 

Daniel Barenboim is another exceptional interpreter of Beethoven and Schubert (--probably anything, really), and is capable of transcendent Brahms. He's a rare musical genius, and his Beethoven trios with du Pre and a very young Pinchas Zukerman are astonishing.

 

Gary Graffman is great for all things Russian--Prokofiev, Rachmaninov, Tchaikovsky.

 

Jorge Bolet for Liszt (and Chopin and Rachmaninoff and probably anything). Earl Wild for Rachmaninov. Ashkenazy for anything Russian. Mitsuko Uchida for Mozart, Beethoven, Bartok, and 20th century stuff--and just about anything Viennese.

 

Stop me.

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For Schubert, Beethoven, Mozart, and Haydn you can't ignore Alfred Brendel.

 

A new face on the scene who has issued excellent recordings of Beethoven and Schubert is Paul Lewis.

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Thanks for the tip re. Paul Lewis, gowan. I do not know his playing.

 

Not sure I need another Beethoven set, though--we already own sets by Brendel, Barenboim (at age 25), and Kempff (the later recording). And I'm tempted to buy the DVD of Barenboim performing all of the sonatas, live (by memory, of course), in Berlin--eight concerts over a three-week period in 2005! 

 

My husband was lucky enough to catch Uchida's final concert of her complete Beethoven cycle at Severance Hall. When she finished, tears were streaming down her face.

 

Although I sometimes find that her intensity overpowers the music (--I sometimes feel the same about Richter), I would like to see Martha Argerich receive some notice here--especially as women seem underrepresented in the piano world.

 

Interestingly, Limelight picks Rachmaninov himself as the #1 pianist of all time.

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Limelight[/url] picks Rachmaninov himself as the #1 pianist of all time.[/size]

Limelight must be an important publication, packed with imbeciles to even try to figure out who are the 10 greatest pianists ever.

Idiocy knows no boundaries. Rachmaninov in particular, was a supreme talent but "out of order" in what is a substantial part of the piano repertoire. One simply can not place them on some imaginary podium, in order, because they do different things which are differently apreciated by different people, and they do those things in direct reflection of the school they come from. And THAT transcends opinion.

Now, what EXACTLY did you find interesting in Rachmaninov being picked up as No1 ???

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"Imbeciles"?

 

I mean, I realize that the people polled by Limelight--such as Andras Schiff, Garrick Ohlsson, Vladamir Ashkenazy, Barry Douglas, Cyprien Kartsaris, Imogen Cooper, and Alfred Brendell--as a group must lack the talent, intellect, insight, and wit of our own "carl stross".

 

But aren't you perhaps being just a wee bit harsh? 

 

Why did I find the top choice interesting? Because Rachmaninov generally passes unmentioned in such discussions (such as CBC's excellent series on the five greatest pianists of the 20th century). Or because people are often so busy arguing the relative merits of Horowitz and Rubinstein. Or because Rachmaninov's recordings are usually remastered from piano rolls and do not represent the artist as accurately as more modern methods. Or because it is enlightening to hear what great pianists have to say about the greatest pianists.

 

Or because I'm just an "imbecile", like all of them.

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"Imbeciles"?

 

I mean, I realize that the people polled by Limelight--such as Andras Schiff, Garrick Ohlsson, Vladamir Ashkenazy, Barry Douglas, Cyprien Kartsaris, Imogen Cooper, and Alfred Brendell--as a group must lack the talent, intellect, insight, and wit of our own "carl stross".

 

But aren't you perhaps being just a wee bit harsh?

No, not at all. Only a complete imbecile would pit Richter against say, Horowitz and come up with a winner. And I mean only a complete retard would get into that.

It's like the eternal discussion about who's the greatest conductor. And by the way, know you how, in many many interviews, our esteemed conductors called one each other ? But that's besides the point. Anyway, List and Busoni are beat by ...Gilels.

Naive, ain't it ?

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I think the responses are terribly enlightening. These are ten great pianists. One can debate why they are, and what one values as a listener or player, and where each player ranks accordingly, and such debate is both entertaining and illuminating.

 

And I think that only an "imbecile" takes pot shots at others for voicing reasoned opinions. (For I happen to find the discussions of each pianist very well-reasoned and insightful). 

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Why did I find interesting? Because Rachmaninov generally passes unmentioned in such discussions (such as CBC's excellent series on the five greatest pianists of the 20th century). Or because people are often so busy arguing the relative merits of Horowitz and Rubenstein. Or because Rachmaninov's recordings are usually remastered from piano rolls and do not represent the artist as accurately as more modern methods. Or because it is enlightening to hear what great pianists have to say about the greatest pianists.

So what ? Let them argue until they die of it - Rachmaninov is anyway greater than all the "arguers" combined and squared.

I don't know how much you know about these things but such comparisons are ABSOLUTE NONSENSE because there is simply no measure with which to measure. We prefer some against others and that WILL vary after the corner of the repertoire but there is a certain level of talent and artistic excellency where these sort of idiotic comparisons have no place.

Let me clarify this for you so that even you can understand : what do you think Richter would've thought of this ?

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I think the responses are terribly enlightening. These are ten great pianists. One can debate why they are, and what one values as a listener or player, and where each player ranks accordingly, and such debate is both entertaining and illuminating.

 

And I think that only an "imbecile" takes pot shots at others for voicing reasoned opinions. (For I happen to find the discussions of each pianist very well-reasoned and insightful). 

 

Well, you're right Jane.  And I'm amazed it has not been moderated yet.  Maybe there's been an effort, but it continues.

 

Anyway, I used to think this was the best on violin until I heard Rachy play it.  Amazing.  While Richter may be my general favorite, Rachmaninoff was genius.  :)

 

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I have HJ Lim cds and have listened to the whole set many times.

 

She should have learned how to play one or two before recording the whole set.

 

There are a few salvageable movements ,but overall very misguided interpretation.

 

Recording was in poor quality also.

 

I hear around c 6-c 7 range ,very out of tune,repeatedly.

 

She has a skill but need a very patient teacher.

 

My favorite is Rubinstein .(100 CD set)

 

Pollini, Barenboim,Murry Perahia etc very good. 

 

Koo young Chung

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Where is everybody? Does nobody listen to pianists?

I listen to pianists all the time.  Probably more than strings.  I barely knew this forum existed.  First time here.

 

Anyway, I second the Crazy Jane suggestion of Barenboim for Brahms.  I heard him play Brahms Concerto 1 with Chicago like 12 years ago and it was one of those life experiences that stick with you forever.  I was completely enraptured by the second movement.  

 

I bought a CD of his after that concert and listen to it quite frequently.  I think this is it, although the cover art on mine is different.  

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000B668WW/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_2?pf_rd_p=1944687642&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B005OV1NLA&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0JVW2931X9MWKRVN1S38

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