curious1

Curious1's bench

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I CAN believe Strad put things together without adjusting afterwards. The last 4 instruments I made did not need adjustment (as opposed to only 1 out of the first 10). If I can do that, I'm convinced that Strad could do much better.Also, I believe today we are much more focused on a rather sharply defined tonal goal, which might not have been in place in Strad's time. A little brighter, a little darker... maybe that was more OK back then.

I agree Don. I think the window for success is pretty broad. I think today we are focused on making instruments that sound like the Titian or Jackson (insert your favorite here) consistently.

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(I think guitars are fundamentally different from violins).

I certainly don't think Strad monkeyed around on the inside after the fact. He had Vuillaume to do that for him!

 

Ha loads of fun to speculate -- that's what I love about this place. You are right guitars, are different beasts -- when d'aquisto described his working methods he clearly noted the difference -- violins are intended to be opened for repair while arch-tops are not. (Apparently it can be done but I expect it is a real pain in the you know what to remove the belly on an arch-top guitar without destroying the binding).

 

I expect you are right as well about strad not toying around with the inside after the fact -- after carving 900 + one would expect his studio would have a feel for getting it right. But who knows? There are pro makers today that will remove the top and re-voice or even carve several tops for the same instrument to get the tone their client is after.

 

Who ever you are Curious1, it is nice to have you around. 

 

Chris

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Hi curious1

 

  I would think when you are closing up the box before purfling and edgework is finished, even though you are not consciously tuning the plates, your fingers and hands and ears are maybe informing your progress to some degree. I built my third violin this way and will try it again. It was comfortable to work on the plates that way and besides the possible tuning advantage I imagine that sculpturally the body could have an advantage of being more unified? subtle I know but lots of little things can make a difference.

 

  I have the feeling that somewhat small differences in edge fluting on the plates can have an effect on the voice of the instrument. More than small chages in graduations out in the field. So if you are finishing your edges ( thickness,fluting and blending into arching) with the box closed your fingers and your brain can make a lot of unconscious decisions that could make a difference.

 

 I know there are many ways to make a beautiful looking and sounding violin, I am just trying to find my own way and am interested in this method of building.

 

  Thanks for posting on MN. I have learned so much here and there seems to be no end to the generous sharing of experience and knowledge.

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I'm curious too, because if unknowns violin-maker are working the way you do, we are in trouble! :)

 

I don't crack the purfling, so C1 has a way to go.

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Ha very funny. Who every you are -- it is nice to have you around Curious1 -- will you post some more pictures of your work? 

Yes, it is nice to have you here.  I for 1, enjoy the mystery.

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I don't crack the purfling, so C1 has a way to go.

I couldn't disagree more.  Totally intentional cracking, to keep in line with the sloppy workmanship of the gDg-ish model. 

 

It is obvious from the first post (to me, at least) that we have a highly experienced, probably well-known maker... we just don't know who it is,.  An unknown can do very precise, excellent work, but the antiquing is a dead giveaway.  That takes a ton of experience, and exposure to real ones.

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God damn it Curious, the uniformity even with the antiquing (seriously well done) is envy inducing. You even managed to place subtle blushes which don't show up orange or become muddied all over the fiddle. Out of curiosity, do you do straight varnishes, I'm curious to see examples if you do.

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Hi everyone,

This is a violin I finished recently and can't decide whether to call it done or not. Ive been tinkering with the insides a bit. Still needs a final post and bridge (string heights a little low). Old Peter Infeld strings too. Any comments?

violin.mp3

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With the qualifier that recordings can be very misleading due to the player and conditions of the recording...

 

Sounds nice.  Guarneri model?  I'm guessing because the mode frequencies appear to be on the high side.  But it sounds rich, lively, and even.

 

The only annoyance I hear is the overly strident B on the E string, a bugaboo I have been battling with minimal success. 

 

I usually prefer to record multiple instruments under the same conditions, and try to make comparisons.  At least there's some chance of factoring out the recording variables.

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 Are you sure it's just been finished - maybe you are pulling our leg... :)

 

curios1 is obviously a master craftsman/artisan/whateveryouwanttocallit.  He wouldn't stoop to pulling legs.

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With the qualifier that recordings can be very misleading due to the player and conditions of the recording...

Sounds nice. Guarneri model? I'm guessing because the mode frequencies appear to be on the high side. But it sounds rich, lively, and even.

The only annoyance I hear is the overly strident B on the E string, a bugaboo I have been battling with minimal success.

I usually prefer to record multiple instruments under the same conditions, and try to make comparisons. At least there's some chance of factoring out the recording variables.

Hi Don,

Yes, a Guarneri model. The B modes are on the high side, yes. 457/546

First time I've done MP3 recording. It may take time for me to get used to it.

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Very nice - impressive ! Are you sure it's just been finished - maybe you are pulling our leg... :)

Hi Carl,

Sometimes I feel like they're never finished. I do like to tinker we I can.

Recently finished. Varnished a little over a month ago. Then I did a little regrad of back and lowering the bar. And just did a little more regrad of back a few days ago.

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With the qualifier that recordings can be very misleading due to the player and conditions of the recording...

 

Sounds nice.  Guarneri model?  I'm guessing because the mode frequencies appear to be on the high side.  But it sounds rich, lively, and even.

 

The only annoyance I hear is the overly strident B on the E string, a bugaboo I have been battling with minimal success. 

 

I usually prefer to record multiple instruments under the same conditions, and try to make comparisons.  At least there's some chance of factoring out the recording variables.

 

Might not happen in 3rd. One puts too much pressure on the 4th finger in 1st pos. Try it in 3rd.

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Hi Carl,

Sometimes I feel like they're never finished. I do like to tinker we I can.

 

I confess I am floored. ( But you know that Bruch is the standard testing track on MN :) )

Don, I think you did Bruch on one of yours a while ago, didn't you ?

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Might not happen in 3rd. One puts too much pressure on the 4th finger in 1st pos. Try it in 3rd.

E string on the low side. Kinda buzzing on the board a bit too.

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