Tets Kimura

Tets Kimura's Bench

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Thanks, Neil, your compliments mean a lot to me.

The exhibition was finished yesterday, and it went a lot better than expected. It worked well that I didn't just display my finished instruments, but also most of my tools, materials, process of making etc.   

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My varnish is a standard oil varnish I make with colophony, mastic, and Linseed oil. I don't use any solvent to thin it, and I don't cook it long once resin and oil are mixed. 
The varnish itself has a lot of colour, but I still load it up with lots of pigments so that I need to apply only one or two coats.  In this instance, the violin has one coloured varnish.

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Did you stain the wood before varnishing?

 

 

The colour of the wood comes mostely from sun tanning. However, I sometimes use a very diluted solution of Sodium Nitrite, as well.

To give you an idea, I attach some a couple of photos of the Guarneri copy being varnished. You can see the contrast between the coloured varnish and the ground. They were both taken by the north facing window.

 

post-23932-0-79127600-1378299249_thumb.jpgpost-23932-0-75683200-1378299302_thumb.jpg

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The colour of the wood comes mostely from sun tanning. However, I sometimes use a very diluted solution of Sodium Nitrite, as well.

To give you an idea, I attach some a couple of photos of the Guarneri copy being varnished. You can see the contrast between the coloured varnish and the ground. They were both taken by the north facing window.

 

attachicon.gifkemp_copy33.JPGattachicon.gifkemp_copy34.JPG

Went something wrong with the purfling in the left part of the  upper bout? I can't imagine that the original Guarneri had the same.  :mellow: 

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My varnish is a standard oil varnish I make with colophony, mastic, and Linseed oil. I don't use any solvent to thin it, and I don't cook it long once resin and oil are mixed.

Can you be more specific about which colophony resin you use? There are many types of colophony and each may give different results. Can you say where you purchase yours?

Edit-Can you also describe the final varnish film characteristics? Is the film soft and flexible or hard and chippy, etc?

Thanks...This info would be very helpful to me at the moment as I'm experimenting with several different pine resins.

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Went something wrong with the purfling in the left part of the  upper bout? I can't imagine that the original Guarneri had the same.  :mellow:

 

Not at all.

This instrument is antiqued so the wear on the wood is put on at a certain point which has happened here in this position where we usually see the wood of the edge  worn back towards the purfling fron 300 years of contact.  :)

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Thanks everybody for your kind comments.
Yes, I was very fotunate to have found such a beautiful gallery, and to use it for my exhibition. The whole space smells of wood, and even though it is a very Japanese style building, it worked well with violins.

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Went something wrong with the purfling in the left part of the  upper bout? I can't imagine that the original Guarneri had the same.  :mellow:

 

As Melvin pointed out, that is to simulate the wear on the edge. Of course, there is always a danger of overdoing it.

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Can you be more specific about which colophony resin you use? There are many types of colophony and each may give different results. Can you say where you purchase yours?

Can you also describe the final varnish film characteristics? Is the film soft and flexible or hard and chippy, etc?

Colophony I use comes from Kremer. I don't have enough knowledge to say exactely which type it is. I cook it for 100+ hours at a low temperature, before mixing with oil.

I have tried cooking with balsam from silver fir, but nowadays I hardly bother using it. 

The varnish is quite thick, but it's not sticky so it's very easy to apply. To have a workable varnish, I've got a feeling that you need to keep your oil relatively raw, and not to over cook when mixing with resin.

It's a little subjective, but I'd say the dried coat is flexible, although it still tends to chip. I'm thinking to increase the amount of resin. I'd like a little more chippiness.  

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As Melvin pointed out, that is to simulate the wear on the edge. Of course, there is always a danger of overdoing it.

Aha I see. Even the imperfections were copied! Well done!

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Colophony I use comes from Kremer. I don't have enough knowledge to say exactely which type it is. I cook it for 100+ hours at a low temperature, before mixing with oil.

I have tried cooking with balsam from silver fir, but nowadays I hardly bother using it. 

The varnish is quite thick, but it's not sticky so it's very easy to apply. To have a workable varnish, I've got a feeling that you need to keep your oil relatively raw, and not to over cook when mixing with resin.

It's a little subjective, but I'd say the dried coat is flexible, although it still tends to chip. I'm thinking to increase the amount of resin. I'd like a little more chippiness.

Thanks for the info...that's answers one of my questions and helps a lot! One more thing I'm experimenting with are cooking times when combining the resin with the oil. You and others have stated that you cook just long enough to blend the oil and resin. Can you tell me about how long this takes to blend? I'm assuming this means that you don't cook to the firm pill stage?

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Sorry for not getting back earlier.
I store cooked resin, and when I need to mix new varnish, I heat up oil and resin separately before combining them together. I don't really time at this stage... Once it looks mixed, I stop the heat. 
In the past I have put solid resin in cold oil (room temperature), and heated them up together until mixed. This might not be a usual way of mixing varnish, but I've never had any problem with the final product.

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