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Berl Mendenhall

Stradivari Tool (Square)

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PS My strings are hemp and after all the use they have had, they look a bit fluffy, but they still work fine. It just looks a bit amature against your video. 

 

Roger, there is nothing you do that is amateur. 

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 Yes, if we are thinking of the same one this was known as an old womans tooth in my school days. 

Exactly.  And most of the tools Sacconi calls “leatherworking--for cases” are small turning tools.

 

Strad:

post-35343-0-10017600-1379710757_thumb.jpg

 

Diderot

post-35343-0-97168200-1379710787_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

James--SUPER JOB!   :)

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I was looking at a web site of a Italian fellow ( believe he's a tool maker).  He's not a violin maker.  He had went to the Stradivari Museum to look at Strads tools and posted some photos of a few of the tools.  This square is one of the pictures.  Look at small end, attachicon.gifas6.jpg look at the molding cut in that end.  Strad couldn't help himself.  He had to make it beautiful.  That molding didn't change the way that square worked one little bit, it just made it prettier and nicer to hold in his hand.  Beauty can come in unusual places.

 

Going back to the OP, yes, decoration.

 

Here is a comparison (1:1 scale) of the large square, and the end of the graduation punch (#665).

post-35343-0-42758100-1379903891_thumb.jpg

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Going back to the OP, yes, decoration.

 

Here is a comparison (1:1 scale) of the large square, and the end of the graduation punch (#665).

Addie, I had no idea this post would turn into one of my favorite.   All due to your participation.  I love old tools and anything I can find on Stradivari's day to day working methods.   A lot of people kicked in information, even Mike made some excellent replicas of Strad's tools.  I've enjoyed every single post.  Thank you.

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Yes, those old guys new what beautiful form was. They knew how to put lines and curves together and make them beautiful. The day I visited the Winterthur museum was a special day for me.  Like I'd went to antique tool heaven. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

i

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I just came across this video explaining the use of the ticking stick and the shape of the stick reminded me of the decorative notch cutout on Strad’s square.  I don’t see why it couldn’t have been used in the same manner.  I’m not sure what use it would be in the violin making process, perhaps copying a mold?  Just a thought..

 

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