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sabaugher

Re-gluing top, lining/ chamfering question

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Hi guys!

 

So, I'm about to re-glue a top plate to a clunker violin I opened up recently. I noticed that there's lining/ chamfering that helps support the glue joint where the ribs meet the back plate. I also noticed that I might have cut through some kind of lining between the ribs and the top plate when I removed the top plate. My questions are

 

1. Am I correct in thinking that when a violin box is initially closed up construction, there is lining/chamfering (of willow or spruce) installed to re-enforce the connection of the top plate to the ribs?

2. If so, any tips for installing that lining?

3. When re-gluing the top plate, must I first do something to prepare the lining/ chamfering? Is is acceptable to not pay attention to the lining when re-gluing a top plate? (I'd rather err on the side of caution and *pay attention to it*, that way the repair is done as well as possible ;D  )

 

Thanks for the help, guys! I really appreciate it!

 

- Sarah

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Hi guys!

 

So, I'm about to re-glue a top plate to a clunker violin I opened up recently. I noticed that there's lining/ chamfering that helps support the glue joint where the ribs meet the back plate. I also noticed that I might have cut through some kind of lining between the ribs and the top plate when I removed the top plate. My questions are

 

1. Am I correct in thinking that when a violin box is initially closed up construction, there is lining/chamfering (of willow or spruce) installed to re-enforce the connection of the top plate to the ribs?

2. If so, any tips for installing that lining?

3. When re-gluing the top plate, must I first do something to prepare the lining/ chamfering? Is is acceptable to not pay attention to the lining when re-gluing a top plate? (I'd rather err on the side of caution and *pay attention to it*, that way the repair is done as well as possible ;D  )

 

Thanks for the help, guys! I really appreciate it!

 

- Sarah

1. Yes, top and bottom.  Omitting linings isn't a sign of quality :lol:

 

2.  For how the makers do it, check the making threads.  For repair, it's usually only an issue if it's damaged or come loose.  I clean the area thoroughly in these cases, and reattach it by injecting hide glue between lining and rib, then using common clothespins as clamps. If the original lining is beyond reuse due to worms or whatever, make new and install it to fit the rib   After reattaching, carefully plane it even with the rib, not the other way around.

 

3.  The exact amount of effort varies.  If, as usually occurs, there are small areas of adhered wood on top or lining/ribs make sure that these areas are carefully remated when regluing.  If it's bad enough, you are into edge repair to conceal it, so avoid having this happen by careful opening.  If you've had to reattach a lining, it is important to ensure that the linings are even with and firmly attached to the ribs before closure.  Never glue a dirty surface.  Good luck, and others will likely add to this and tell you what a goose I am :lol:

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Sarah

 

I'm not sure what you mean by chamfering when it comes to the linings. The linings are there to provide reinforcement for the top to ribs joint. The surface of the linings where they meet the top plate should be flat, in line with the top of the ribs, and parallel to the matching surface of the top plate. For installing linings, pre-bend the lining pieces with heat to match the curve of the ribs, and use lots of small clamps when gluing in. I use small spring clamps. Use thinnish hot hide glue for gluing the top back on. Pre-clamp dry, then release the clamps, one section at a time, and work glue into the joint before reclamping.

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...any tips for installing that lining?...

 

 

If you are re-installing an old lining that has come unglued, Violadamore covered it pretty well.  If you are makining a new lining to replace one that is missing, I think the usual proceedure is to cut out wood strips to the desired rectangular cross section, bend them, cut them to length, glue them to the ribs sticking up a bit high, plane them flush with the ribs and cut the chamfer.

 

 

...When re-gluing the top plate, must I first do something to prepare the lining/ chamfering? Is is acceptable to not pay attention to the lining when re-gluing a top plate?...

 

Paying attention to the linings is normal and expected, but often you don't have to do anything because the linings are fine.  I occasionally have to reglue loose spots of linings to the ribs.  I don't worry if little lining splinters are missing.  Little bits often split off when the top is removed.

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