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Fjodor

Fjodor´s bench

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Thanks for the tip actonern. I don't own a table saw but would like to have something better for the endblocks, it is not easy to get smooth curve there with my setup.

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It's a long time since i posted but the violin is finished now, so I thought i'd post some pictures.

These are some that I took while varnishing. The violin turned out fine, and I think it is my best sounding so far. Maybe the high density spruce is to thank :-)

 

drying.jpg

 

varnish.jpg

 

varnish3.jpg

 

varnish4.jpg

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Thank you John. I used Joe Robsons products. I tried to get a dark base with tea and a short fuming with ammonia. Then sodium nitrite and UV. After that I used Joes ground system with aged wood color gold. Then greek pitch brown varnish with a little dark rose color concentrate.

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Fjodor, the purfling detail is great and the varnish looks very good indeed. 

Since you can do the handwork to a high standard, you need not use many machines, it only complicates things in the end. 
Plus, people will always appreciate hand skills. 
 

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Fjodor, the purfling detail is great and the varnish looks very good indeed. 

Since you can do the handwork to a high standard, you need not use many machines, it only complicates things in the end. 

Plus, people will always appreciate hand skills. 

 

Ben,

 

Is this you? I looked at some of your photos of violins and flowers. You know what you are doing with light.

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Thanks for the kind words.

I don't use many power tools, and prefer to do things by hand.
I was thought to finish the corner blocks with a sanding drum in a drill press and tried to make something similar.
The sanding goes so slowly so there is no risk of ruining things.

Cool photo of Ben!
 

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I took some pictures while doing the purfling in the corners on backplate I'm working on.

 

This is how I do it:

 

Mark the purfling channel with the marking tool and extend it a bit in the corner for a "bee-sting"

post-24701-0-96428300-1406812559_thumb.jpg

 

Rinse the groove and even out the curve a bit for the beesting

post-24701-0-28851800-1406812562_thumb.jpg

 

Glue in the c-bout purfling as this and leve it to dry. I leave a bit wood in the outer bout groove to help prevent hurting the corner "triangle"

post-24701-0-44150200-1406812568_thumb.jpg

 

Then cut away half of the c-bout purfling in the corner, bend and try to fit the outer pufling strip as good as possible.

post-24701-0-50573100-1406812572_thumb.jpg

 

All strips glued

post-24701-0-95790800-1406812574_thumb.jpg

 

These are the tools I used.

post-24701-0-11568200-1406812577_thumb.jpg

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Really nice work!

How old is the birch and how does it "feel" compared to the maple of your last one. One of LK's first violins, with birch back, beat mine with two placements in Sibelius violin making sound contest (a long time ago). This was also one of the violins that stod out for more playing because it had a special sound, espacially on E string. LK and I was there when they played this violin a couple of times. It had very clean carrying higher notes, with lots of overtones.

I have also heard the same phenomenon from a violin with rowan back, made by an amateur. I think I know why :)

I have linked this particular sound also to one of curious1's violins with very high density back.

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Thanks,

 

I would think that this wood is about 20 years old. (It's some leftovers from my grandfathers making) I think this birch behaves much like maple but it

is a bit more prone to split along the grain when working it, so one has to be careful.

 

I have several birch back fiddles (and made one my self) and they are all very different from each other, so I can't say there is some special quality to it. Personally i think the spruce and the model of the violin makes more difference.

 

My latest birch back, a small model, I left very thick. It was developing nicely but recently I think it has gotten worse recently (dry g string), but maybe it's just a matter of adjusting the sound post...

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You really have talent!

Great work with the scroll. The varnishing job is also outstanding, it looks like it's not too thick and yet full of colors.

The whole violin is really nice.

LK shouldn't have introduced you to violin making he has competition now :)

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Fjodor,  That is really sweet.  I like the model outline, what is it?  It certainly isn't frumpy.  I don't like frumpy looking violins.  I used birch on one, and it is the most clear sounding of any that I've made.  It had  deep flames in it that you had to watch out for, and the ring tone was a little lower; but topped with a low density top it seemed to work.   Nice scroll too.  I haven't figured that part out yet.

Ken

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Thank you Peter,

It's still a long way to LK's standard. ( I think it would be for most makers :)

We have to meet some time and play and compare the violins when you get yours finished.

Thanks Ken, This is my own small model that I made when i had some nice wood with small dimensions. I have made 3 of them now and tried a bit of different things. I also find birch works fine for the back. Higher density spruce seems to work best for me so far..

I tried to follow the plowden graduations for the back, it ended up at about 100g. The tap tone in the middle of the back ( Ring tone ?) was 300hz, is that low? Anyway the violin seems to have a nice deep tone :)

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300 Hz is low, but on the other hand if you like the violin it doesn't mean anything.

For this low performance birch wood the arch should have been ~2 mm higher to get M5 ~340 Hz

Have LK to show you next time you visit him.

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