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Kallie

Gum turpentine question

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Hi there,

 

I made some varnish a while ago by using a recipe that I found online, to be more specific, it was a pdf file on Thestrad. The link unfortunately doesnt work anymore so linking it here wont help.

 

Anyways, the recipe contains pine resin, linseed oil, and aloe powder. It said the varnish can be thinned with Gum turpentine to the desired consistancy afterwards.

 

My question is, what sort of gum turpentine would be needed for this? If this is anything like linseed oil, there is so much different types which makes it hard to know which would be usable in varnish. Would I need 100% pure gum turpentine?

 

I found 2 examples of gum turpentine on Ebay that can ship to where I live, can someone please tell me if this might work?

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Turpentine-Gum-Therapeutic-Grade-100-ml-3-4-oz-Skipidar-All-Natural-/110992150787?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19d7a5d103#shId

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mylands-Pure-Gum-Turpentine-1-Litre-/190731553366?ssPageName=ADME:X:eRTM:GB:1123

 

Thank You.

If anyone is interested, I still have the PDF saved, so I can provide the full recipe here.

 

 

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I can't give advice on turpentine but I would like to see the recipe.   The only turpentine I can find locally is in a can at the hardware store and it smells like a rotting cadaver.  Good turpentine should smell like a pine tree. 

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I think it's the A. Beardsmore recipe. You don't need turpentine as a diluent for your varnish, you can use some other solvent like white spirit or kerosen. As some people pointed out gum turpentine will oxidise and create a kind of resin by itself. Sometimes this is not something you want

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Kallie, amongst others the Micah chain of hardware stores supply what they call "genuine turpentine". It's the real thing, I've used it for a long time,. It's got a fresh pine smell to it. So you should be able to get it where you are, it's not necessary to import it.

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Sorry, that's MICA Hardware.

 

Find a store http://www.mica.co.za/index.php/store-locator-2

 

And they do have what you are looking for - high-quality gum spirits ("Genuine Turpentine"). A simple test - if you leave it open, it will turn yellow and gummy quite quickly by oxidation. I've used that particular product for over a decade.As far as I know it's not locally produced, so it's relatively expensive: about R80 for a 750ml bottle.

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abcviolins.com.au/how-to-make-a-varnish

 

varnish2.jpg

 

varnish8.jpg

 

"When the varnish has cooled completely, it can be thinned to the desired consistency with gum turpentine – we usually find we need to add around 100ml, but it will depend on how much you initially sun-thickened the linseed oil."

 

Yes, that is the recipe I was talking about.

 

 

I think it's the A. Beardsmore recipe. You don't need turpentine as a diluent for your varnish, you can use some other solvent like white spirit or kerosen. As some people pointed out gum turpentine will oxidise and create a kind of resin by itself. Sometimes this is not something you want

.

Thank You, I will have a look at that.

 

 

Sorry, that's MICA Hardware.

 

Find a store http://www.mica.co.za/index.php/store-locator-2

 

And they do have what you are looking for - high-quality gum spirits ("Genuine Turpentine"). A simple test - if you leave it open, it will turn yellow and gummy quite quickly by oxidation. I've used that particular product for over a decade.As far as I know it's not locally produced, so it's relatively expensive: about R80 for a 750ml bottle.

 

Thanx again Jacob. I figured you meant Mica. It turning yellow and gummy, is that a good or bad thing?

 

On a unrelated topic, I got the wood gouges, scrapers, etc from Hardware Center in Cape town the other day like you suggested. They had everything I needed. Thanx again.

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Hi Kallie,

 

It's a very good thing if it turns yellow and gummy - that it what is supposed to happen to gum spirits when it oxidizes.

 

It's great that you got sorted at Hardward Center.

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Hi Kallie,

 

It's a very good thing if it turns yellow and gummy - that it what is supposed to happen to gum spirits when it oxidizes.

 

It's great that you got sorted at Hardward Center.

Is it great if it is being used as a thinner?

I can see being gummy and thick alright if it is being used as a resin.

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I was simply trying to reassure Kallie that the stuff I'm suggesting is good-quality gum spirits of turpentine, which is what he asked about. It is a well-known fact that if used as a thinner it should be fresh.

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In my experience when it has turned gummy it can't be used as a thinner anymore, more as a plasticizer, as it stays gummy and never really dries…

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Yes, of course.

 

Perhaps the originators of the recipe Kallie described found that fresh gum spirits is the best solvent for that particular recipe. There are recipes which work better with other solvents such as kerosene (paraffin), mineral spirits, spike oil etc. Some recipes call for gum spirits as a constituent part of the varnish (Joe Robson, William Fulton). In another thread I'm trying to get to the bottom of this.

 

I've been making oil varnish for twelve years. Most of the recipes sound simple, but all require patience and lots of experimentation. The latest hurdle I had to try and overcome was "which oil?" This ended up being perhaps the most crucial and most frustrating quest of all. And now it seems that one can get away without using any solvent at all (Roger Hargrave), and can get color without adding lakes or pigments.

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Is it great if it is being used as a thinner?

I can see being gummy and thick alright if it is being used as a resin.

 

I love it as a sovent, can't get enough of it, and I treat is as a precious item.

 

I use it to make hard copal tintures.

 

I use it to slow down drying time of shellac, once oxidized it mixes with alc based varnishes, I have used it to mix turps based tinctures with alc based varnishes....it rocks...

 

etc. .... of course there are many stages of oxidation....need to experiment...also oxidized in the sun is a different beast...don't ask me why and what because I don't know... :D

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I was simply trying to reassure Kallie that the stuff I'm suggesting is good-quality gum spirits of turpentine, which is what he asked about. It is a well-known fact that if used as a thinner it should be fresh.

I see now.

You are saying 'You have the right stuff.' which makes sense.

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Yes, of course.

 

Perhaps the originators of the recipe Kallie described found that fresh gum spirits is the best solvent for that particular recipe. There are recipes which work better with other solvents such as kerosene (paraffin), mineral spirits, spike oil etc. Some recipes call for gum spirits as a constituent part of the varnish (Joe Robson, William Fulton). In another thread I'm trying to get to the bottom of this.

 

I've been making oil varnish for twelve years. Most of the recipes sound simple, but all require patience and lots of experimentation. The latest hurdle I had to try and overcome was "which oil?" This ended up being perhaps the most crucial and most frustrating quest of all. And now it seems that one can get away without using any solvent at all (Roger Hargrave), and can get color without adding lakes or pigments.

I have been reading them for twelve years, and there is a lot of great information.

Thanks

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The million different names for the same thing is a major mess, and the same name for different things is even more confusing. In Italy 1500's to 1800's the names where already confusing, today it's gotten worst.

 

Turpentine - The resinous juice that seeps from the Pine, Abies, Larch, Cypress, Terebinth. Itʼs liquid iis called Turpentine. Gum Turpentine in italian would also be this one (Gomma di Trementina)

 

Same liquid when hardened by the sun or fire is called Rosin (Rasa)

 

Spirits of Turpentine, or Gum Spirits of Turpentine (Spirito di Trementina) is the silvery distillation from the Turpentine, in the time of the masters some folks ran it through a second distillation.

 

Why do they still keep the word gum? It's not a gum...is it?

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