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Janito

Janito's bench

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Luckily, the goopy crap comes off with denatured alcohol, but it is difficult to see what is left.  I am using a kitchen towel soaked in alcohol.

 

Note: I am being very careful with important glue joints (back and front seams, neck joint etc) not to do anything that might compromise stability.

 

When dry, the colour differences show where there is still some residual varnish (darker patches).  They need to come off because a scraper just glides on them.

 

Ps - Remembering the asparagus pot trick from the Making a Double Bass thread, I dunked the scroll in the tall pot with alcohol - relatively easy removal from complex curved surfaces; still needed to make some bespoke wood scraper tools...

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Luckily, the goopy crap comes off with denatured alcohol, but it is difficult to see what is left.  I am using a kitchen towel soaked in alcohol.

 

Note: I am being very careful with important glue joints (back and front seams, neck joint etc) not to do anything that might compromise stability.

 

When dry, the colour differences show where there is still some residual varnish (darker patches).  They need to come off because a scraper just glides on them.

 

Ps - Remembering the asparagus pot trick from the Making a Double Bass thread, I dunked the scroll in the tall pot with alcohol - relatively easy removal from complex curved surfaces; still needed to make some bespoke wood scraper tools...

So this means you don't have a pot big enough to just mask the f-holes and dunk the cello?

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I too dip the scroll into solvent. I found that a plastic "scruffy pad" working on varnish softened by solvents, works nicely. I switch alternately to a cotton cloth with the solvent to mop up residue. I did this on a recent violin and hope to bring it to the Baltimore VSA for comments on the new varnish.

 

Mike

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on the rare occasions when I have had to strip Instruments I used acetone rather than alcohol. I have never had any trouble with glue joins but sometimes you get a small amount of " burning" where the diluted varnish sinks into the flames and soft wood of the top. For this reason I try all varnishes on scrap wood or VSOs purchased for that purpose. I also seal the wood pretty carefully before the first coat of varnish but the stripper wash still can penetrate at times.

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I have been away for a while, but did not waste my time.

 

Visited my old friend Viotti and a new English clock and watch exhibition in the Science museum (London).  I was amazed by the delicacy of the metalwork. Interesting that 2 great mathematicians were in evidence, Newton and Napier.

 

And this Shard has appeared only metres away from where I trained (sadly the old medics dinner hall is now a McDonald's).

 

The yellow thing was not available for rental.

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Aw!  Too bad you couldn't rent the yellow thingy...it's adorable!

 

Glad you had a good vacation! (?) :)

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Welcome back.

 

Thanks!

 

I am always inspired when I see the Viotti, but it's a shame that the Royal Academy have not replaced the second tier instruments on display back to the masterworks they have had on show in the past.

 

I have a violin, viola and cello at different stages of varnishing, so lots to be done there.

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I have a violin, viola and cello at different stages of varnishing, so lots to be done there.

 

Yeh + 2 post-stripping and no place for them to go.

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Is this the cello we have "discusssed"?

The cello we discussed is stripped and grounded (post #107) - awaiting sunny weather to start the varnishing (lightbox not big enough).

 

Last week I also stripped 2 violins with a varnish I was not happy with.  I am in the process of applying your balsam ground to them.

 

They are hanging around and waiting patiently for their turn in the UV cooker.

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These violins were stripped 4-7 days ago - they had had very little wood tanning before varnishing.

 

Now they have Joe Robson's aged wood colors during the balsam grounding process.

 

There is no burning of the flames.

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Did you give all three the same ground/color treatment?  Which photo do you feel best represents the actual color that you see?  I ask because on my screen the violins and your workbench vary in color, with the center picture being the most brown (violin and workbench).

 

Thanks,

Jim

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Did you give all three the same ground/color treatment?  Which photo do you feel best represents the actual color that you see?  I ask because on my screen the violins and your workbench vary in color, with the center picture being the most brown (violin and workbench).

 

The left and middle photos are of the same violin taken seconds apart with different incident lighting.

 

I would say that the colours are representative of the variations that can be seen depending on the lighting conditions. 

 

This shows that danger of comparing 1 single image and believing that it is the 'truth'.

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Early morning natural light - different tones again! 

 

The flames are not burned in.

 

Ps - useful also to compare the variation in bench colour.

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I have used Robson's balsam ground system with the colours on these 2 violins.  I have not completed the process yet (4 preparations + balsam varnish).

 

I have used the colours with preparation #1 which contains a mordant to colour bridges and that works very well to get an 'aged' look.

 

I have not used the colours alone on a violin, but Joe can comment further.

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do you seal the wood before application of the aged wood colour?

Even though the fiddles were stripped you never get all the it out. So it will remain sealed if you will. IME I think Joe's colors/stains and balsam ground work best on unfinished wood.

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