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Janito

Janito's bench

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52 minutes ago, MANFIO said:

Wow, very nice!

Thanks.

The ribs are 35mm at the neck block and 42mm at the bottom block - we'll see how it plays and sounds!

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4 hours ago, Janito said:

Thanks.

The ribs are 35mm at the neck block and 42mm at the bottom block - we'll see how it plays and sounds!

I've been using 33 at the neck blok and 38 mm at the bottom block. 

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15 hours ago, MANFIO said:

I've been using 33 at the neck blok and 38 mm at the bottom block. 

I will probably take the bottom block down further. 35mm was reasonably comfortable at the neck block in my last viola. 

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Cousins-once-removed (1 and 2 are potential violin alternatives for the same garland if shake in #1 does not carve out).

Cousins 3.jpg

Cousins 1.jpg

Cousins 2.jpg

Alt Plates.jpg

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I like some unintentional asymmetry.

I hope in 300 years (should we get there) some poor sod doesn't waste time worrying why the violin shape does not conform to the mould found in a dusty attic. ;)

 

Asymmetry at upper bout.jpg

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Some progress on violin, but have been sidetracked again by distractions...

There is a lot of wood to come off so it looks like the shake will carve out of the nice billet of split Engelmann (old Sitka on the left).  I started the exercise with the intention of completing both tops and doing a compare-and-contrast as a playable violin (same back etc)...but I have limited patience.

Some progress.jpg

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4 hours ago, Jim Bress said:

What did you measure? 

Different densities when I hold them in each hand (and I even do a crossover test). I measure very little with gauges, except when I am baking - shame on me.

I would say that it is rather a mug's game to believe that everything can be controlled between 2 finished plates so that only one variable, such as wood density, is different. 

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I had to look up "Mug's game".  I like the term.  When the tests are done are you hoping to point a finger at something and say maybe this matters or this does not matter?  Or just shrug your shoulders and say that was fun, I'll leave this top on and build another body for the other?

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I have been interested for some time in the ‘type’ of sound from different kinds of woods, as opposed to just loudness. The problem is that of controlling the variables - l am too wayward to be bothered with details, so no rigorous scientific method involved.

In this case, it may just end up as ‘ I like this more than that when paired with the rest of the box and it was fun’. :)

 

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Interesting Janito. I took this photo some years ago.  Side view of Van Gogh`s "Wheat Field with Cypresses" showingn the thick layer of oil colours that gives texture to the paniting, making it almost tridimensional. I was surprised to see that there was no cracking in the thick paint (in some parts it may be 7 mm thick, or even more).  Van Gogh`s painting style and technique may have caused a shock in his time, he sold just one of his paintins in his lifetime..

 

267890_1462150089773_2587711_n.jpg?oh=ba

 

 

image.png.ea866668ad63a2f5e0b2edb48df82a97.png

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Thanks.

Clearly, there are good and bad things regarding media as Sir Joshua Reynolds found out!  I made a pig's ear of varnishing a cello when I added an essence that prevented it from curing over a period of more than 20 years (see earlier posts in this thread).  

I was amazed by the example of safflower weeping from the paint blob - a very cautionary tale regarding choice of components for a varnish.  Materials may leach from containers that could have a deleterious effect on a varnish.

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