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These are genween Janitos.

 

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Removed the crappy photos - will replace with sharper ones.

 

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Replaced

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The acquaintance again.

 

Interesting how flat the eye is (sharp chamfer) compared to the usual over-rubbed and rounded ones commonly seen.

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The acquaintance again.

 

Interesting how flat the eye is (sharp chamfer) compared to the usual over-rubbed and rounded ones commonly seen.

This looks normal. I thought the rounded eyes were just worn down. Sometimes there is a stamp or clamp mark on the eye center. Am I wrong?

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This looks normal. I thought the rounded eyes were just worn down. Sometimes there is a stamp or clamp mark on the eye center. Am I wrong?

 

No. 

 

I was simply commenting on the fact that a 300 year old Master violin has a sharp chamfer around the eye.  Nice to be reminded about Strad's intent.

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What dimension do you use for the length of bridge feet. Interesting undercut. The feet look thick. Nicely done?

 

I am not a fan of thin feet, the extensions beyond the legs are there to do something - otherwise why have them.  I will trim them a smidgeon when the set-up is off for varnishing.

 

It's a very old standard-sized (aka all purpose) Aubert Multo-Deluxo-Supremo, so standard length of feet.

 

I like the "?" - undoubtedly you have doubts.

 

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What do you mean by undercut?

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Just for fun...the light reflections show nicely how the Master shaped the back of the scroll.

 

[i prefer thinner peg shafts]

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I have several instruments to varnish, but a Displacement Reaction forced me to make this great chilli con carne instead:

 

 

Highly recommended - and Heston can probably provide an MSDS from his laboratory.

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Arlecchino seccondo - a 16 1/2" viola.

 

PoP/varnish sealer & Robson balsam ground + Robson colours.  Nothing else yet.

 

The back colour is more like the reddish-brown of the ribs.

 

It always amazes me to see striking flames with no burning-in.

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I really like how the grain lines of the ribs line up.  What kind of maple are the back/ribs?

 

Thanks.

 

Old North American. I suspect Big-leaf with striking range of colours that developed rapidly with UV. Pretty low density, so I have been saving this 1-piece for a large viola.

 

Funny...I have not noticed the matching grain lines - coincidence and not foresight.

 

very nice work,  but the ground colours don't seem to be doing an awful lot (?)

 

I should have said more.  In Joe Robson's balsam ground system, the all-wood colours are added to components 2 to 4.  These photos are at stage 2, so more colours + UV are on the menu.

 

I was quite frustrated with the camera because the colour matching was rather poor.  The back is like the ribs, which is reasonably accurate. The top is lighter and will need extra colour/UV.

 

This maple changed colour with UV very rapidly; by contrast, the 'Danny Devito' partner's European maple is a recalcitrant white with UV.

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A cautionary tale: don't monkey around with varnish without knowing what the consequences may be...

 

I made the cello in 1993/1994.  First varnish ending up with grass-seed when the cello was blown over and was stripped.  Second varnish was 'experimental' and has not 'dried' in 2 decades.

 

The instrument is too good to be hanging by a window. Time to re-strip and re-varnish.

 

Removing goopy varnish from a cello is no fun job.

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I went to reading about varnishes after the "cautonary statement above the other day.   I thought, did he use some olive oil and sandarac?  What else could it of been?  So, Janito what happened?

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At the time I was messing around with essential oils to manipulate the 'working properties' of the varnish. At the time there was no internet...

 

What I did not realise was that the oils were affecting the properties to the extent that coats appeared touch-dry, but were not curing properly before the next one was applied.

 

So I ended up with islands of surface varnish floating on unstable stuff, and I am pleased to say that I was able to replicate the geological process of tectonic plate movement.

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So I ended up with islands of surface varnish floating on unstable stuff, and I am pleased to say that I was able to replicate the geological process of tectonic plate movement.

 

AKA dry mud flats...........

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