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What did you do to make it work... much thinner graduations, or leave it heavy, or something inbetween?

Hi Don,

I made the belly 2.8mm in the middle and around 2.6mm elsewhere and it worked to my surprise sold to a fine pro player and got good feedback from several others who know their stuff which is obviously a better evaluation than my own favorable opinion. The wood did have a notably brittle and crisp texture which I guess might have been significant? (The model was based on the Alard del Gesu.)

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  • 4 weeks later...

Disappointed.  ;)

 

May I ask why a 7 piece top?

Good question!

I have lots of really nice cello fronts in my wood store but this wood I am using has some very rare and special qualities including great age. There was not enough useable wood to make a two piece front but after a quite difficult logistic exercise avoiding knots, worm and rot I got three central sections perfectly quartered with minimal run-out and  decent pieces for wings...It's a Ruggeri copy and actually there is a Ruggeri from 1690 in the Dextra collection with the same belly arrangement. Isserlis' Strad has it too.

There are two ugly recent nail holes in this wood which I will plug but not entirely disguise as they are almost  a kind of stigmata.

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Thanks for the info. 

I've got more questions, I think.

 

But for now I would like to express an appreciation for workshop photos, and the small things they show.

Direct your attention to the third photo.

See anything?

 

There is a lot, but what I love is the single paper clip hanging from a nail.

At some point that happened, for what ever reason. A small gesture.

Why? Who knows? Who cares? Not me.

People being people all over the world.

Thanks.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi Melvin, hope you are well.
Interesting wood for Cello front ! Hope it sounds suitably old. 
I'm making another Cello now, same ff's as yours but stretched Guad form, using some 'interesting' wood too. 

You might find a Cello cradle useful, I just got one and it really helps. 
This one is for violin, the Cello ones are around E150. 
You need not use the ball vice thing, the cradle is 50mm thick ply, so heavy it stays put. 
I added a baton under it and mount it in the swivelling engineers vice. 

http://www.mehr-als-werkzeug.de/product/703931/Shaping-Mould-for-Tops-and-Backs-Violin.htm

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Hi Melvin, hope you are well.

Interesting wood for Cello front ! Hope it sounds suitably old. 

I'm making another Cello now, same ff's as yours but stretched Guad form, using some 'interesting' wood too. 

You might find a Cello cradle useful, I just got one and it really helps. 

This one is for violin, the Cello ones are around E150. 

You need not use the ball vice thing, the cradle is 50mm thick ply, so heavy it stays put. 

I added a baton under it and mount it in the swivelling engineers vice. 

http://www.mehr-als-werkzeug.de/product/703931/Shaping-Mould-for-Tops-and-Backs-Violin.htm

Hi Ben,

OK here thanks & Happy New Year to you and yours.

Thanks for the link to the cradle. I already have a much more primative version of this that I made for myself in haste but the product your link shows looks very effective and good value. 

It could be great if you can illustrate your current cello making here.

Bests

Melvin

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Melvin, that's a poplar back?  Whatever it is, how do you decide on grads for wood that is not the same as the instrument you're copying?

 

Best regards,

E

Hi Ern,

Yes that is a poplar back!

I am pretty conservative ( with a small C) when I work. Normally I will be copying an old Italian instrument that is known to work well. Generally I will source as similar as possible wood as possible when I do a copy. . For every instrument that I copy I have several pieces in stock waiting to be used. Most of my work is copy based. I just try to have a large stock of wood and match it to what I copy. Your question is a good one. Normally I would make the grads a bit thicker if in doubt and regradate the instrument later if needed.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The few pictures in this post are for MN member Tango who some time ago I promised to show ribs being removed from a mold with all linings attached. These are cello ribs and I did not document the process well. I hope to show violin ribs before too long and in better detail but I hope something here could be of use or interest.

 

Stage one for removing the ribs from the mold is to check that none of the ribs have adheared to the mold.( to prevent adhesion before using a mold.. I rub wax into the edges of my mold  removing any excess with a rag damped with turps).

 

The corner blocks need to be busted of the mold first ( NEVER the end blocks!). This needs to be done with a percussive shock rather than with torque and power. I use a tiny pin hammer even on celli. You must never hit the block directly. Always place a sturdy hard piece of maple or MDF...( not spruce) between the block and the hammer. This piece of wood MUST be the full width of the block. The hammer blow must be fast but not hard. Do it with a the flick of a wrist rather than the movement of arm or shoulder.  If there is no initial effect turn the mold over and hit the block on its other side in the same way...if nothing much happens, increase the speed but not the power of the blow & repeat the procedure. This should break even  a very sturdy overdone hide glue bond.

 

Once the corner blocks are all snapped off the end blocks will now actually have somewhere to go when we try to bust them off which they would not have had before. Proceed as above until they are free. When a block breaks free on one side of the mold don't repeat the hit on that side of the mold but instead turn the mold over and hit the block on the other side of the mold.

 

It is entirely possible to remove ribs with all linings attached from replicas of Strad's molds. I build a kink into my corner block housing on my molds to make it even easier. This is the first photo in the series below but the rest are in order of procedure.

 

Pics below...Hopefully in order

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