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After yesterdays adventure with a series of "unlucky" incidents, I went straight to the workshop in the morning, to see how it turned out. Everything is fine, the minor uneven bending can be hidden, but I really should learn to stop when things aren't going well!

 

post-37356-0-38628600-1382947814_thumb.jpg

 

Decided to document every mistake and problems that's coming up along the way with this one.

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Decided to document every mistake and problems that's coming up along the way with this one.

That's smart.  I often think I make mountains out of ant hills.  On the flip side, there are probably serious mistakes I'm not even aware of.  Showing your "good" and "bad" work is a nice way to learn the difference. 

 

-Jim

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Back halves joined together. This wood is different from what I have used before, same thing with the ribs. Only toothed blade works. I primed the joints before gluing. Unfortunatly I think I might have used too thick glue for the final gluing (used a lot of glue). Clamped together tightly, put some more glue over the joint and brushed over with hot water a couple of time. Let's see tomorrow.

 

One thing hit me, maybe it would be a good way to glue the halves directly after planed with the toothed blade without scraping the joints flat?

 

post-37356-0-50265300-1383397235_thumb.jpg post-37356-0-80934400-1383397249_thumb.jpg

post-37356-0-00683000-1383397263_thumb.jpg post-37356-0-22066400-1383397278_thumb.jpg

 

 

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Why are you using a toothed blade on plate joints? 

 

I didn't manage to get any normal plane to work on this maple! I tried all the other planes above, even rasor sharp and thin shavings as I use to, but i still chipped out in the curls. It's a new experience for me. The Wood is also well seasoned.

 

If you look at the second picture (back side) you can see that the wood is grown uneven and dense grown. it looks like maple for bridges in some places.

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