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On 11/10/2017 at 6:36 PM, Peter K-G said:

Faded Madder pigments!

 The images aren't too comparable because the first image (2013) is taken with another warmer camera, but almost all madder (Kremer powder) has faded, the varnish hasn't change, still glossy and good.

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A little bit of research (lot of information/thinking from Roger Hargrave's Double bass document)

Madder pigment powder - Not good

"Normal" Artist grade tube paint - Not good

Permanent Alizarin Crimson - Yes!

https://www.justpaint.org/alizarin-crimson-now-you-see-it/

 

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18 hours ago, Peter K-G said:

AlizarinGlaze.thumb.jpg.5b43e226de419db8223a291017c7195f.jpg

Final two thin coats with no color (1 really thin ground coat, 2 colored with Permanent Alizarin Crimson pr177, 2 top coats with no color)

It is slightly less red in reality and as usual it's impossible to capture the real result. What i like about this test is that it is varying a lot between golden brown and golden red/brown and the reflection is much more exciting than what I have achieved so far. In a certain angle the flames almost disappear and it looks kind of dull/uninteresting/almost messy and not beautiful at all. Changing the angle just a little bit and the flames pops out beautifully. When a shadow is cast it's really dark

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On 7/19/2018 at 12:22 PM, Peter K-G said:

I am glad to hear that there is a good alternative to using Vermilion, which contains a mercury compound requiring care in handling. However, the link you gave seems to recommend an anthraquinone pigment as a better choice. Of course, a super-high lightfastness rating may not be necessary for something that is mainly kept indoors.

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6 hours ago, Quadibloc said:

I am glad to hear that there is a good alternative to using Vermilion, which contains a mercury compound requiring care in handling. However, the link you gave seems to recommend an anthraquinone pigment as a better choice. Of course, a super-high lightfastness rating may not be necessary for something that is mainly kept indoors.

There is endless possibilities, so everyone can find a solution that he/she likes.

Myself I'm developing in the directilon

Ingredients should be well known, cheap and non toxic/edible and as few as possible.

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14 hours ago, Szymon said:

Hi Peter. This ground  is from lime and curd? In what proportions?

Not measured exactly but I think about 85/15 Quark/lime and into that ~3-5% linseed oil.

The wood was prepared with strong yello label tea and one week tanning.

 

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So it's about time to start making a new violin and end this varnish testing, that I have been doing all summer. It has been interesting and also rewarding. I have learned a lot about how to achieve what I want. It involves a lot of things from what type of wood you start with and how the grounding color is done. 

On the previous ground:

One thin sealing layer, one layer with madder pigments mulled into varnish, two thin top coat layers. All with the same varnish.

What I like most is the reflection and shimmer in different light directions when using pigments like this, it's also very transparent.

 

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On 8/11/2018 at 6:43 PM, Peter K-G said:

Optimizing grounding, no varnish yet, scraped off a part, to see comparison where it started from:

Ground.thumb.jpg.5905a3515c22d9f18fc44b69a4a095fb.jpg

 

On 8/15/2018 at 10:54 PM, Nick Allen said:

While technically a ground, it just looks like a finished varnish job. 

Here is another image of the ground taken closer and in bright light, as you can see it looks (and feels) like wood, only colored from the chemical reaction when rubbing it on.

Ground2.thumb.jpg.7b90b375e5265decfb1ceeb37015578c.jpg

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On 8/15/2018 at 10:54 PM, carl1961 said:

Awesome work Peter, Nice color too,  is the madder pigments mulled into varnish Layer rubbed on or brushed?

I use only may hands, no brushes

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4 hours ago, Peter K-G said:

 

Here is another image of the ground taken closer and in bright light, as you can see it looks (and feels) like wood, only colored from the chemical reaction when rubbing it on.

Ground2.thumb.jpg.7b90b375e5265decfb1ceeb37015578c.jpg

Ah. Perhaps I was looking the finished varnish to begin with :D. Looks nice and toasty.

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On 8/17/2018 at 12:41 PM, Peter K-G said:

 

Here is another image of the ground taken closer and in bright light, as you can see it looks (and feels) like wood, only colored from the chemical reaction when rubbing it on.

Ground2.thumb.jpg.7b90b375e5265decfb1ceeb37015578c.jpg

Looks good. I have never got this dark ground with the quark/lime. Do you think the reaction is  'enhanced' primarily from the tea treatment or the sun tanning?

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On 1. syyskuuta 2018 at 9:21 PM, Fjodor said:

Looks good. I have never got this dark ground with the quark/lime. Do you think the reaction is  'enhanced' primarily from the tea treatment or the sun tanning?

It's both, because only tea and short UV time doesn't make that strong reaction. I also tried white wine, that worked too but not as much. 

On the other hand a very tanned piece of wood or old dark yellow wood gives the same darkness level, but more golden yellow than this golden brown.

The piece was exposed to direct sunlight for 6 days after the tea treatment.

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Still no time to make violins... but thinking of violins and varnish, in the middle of the night I can (our balcony is facing south), while Näcken spelar fiol

Capture.thumb.JPG.9c53f1f38e7cb21f46dcd0d33935809e.JPG

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