Advice on milling/preparing wood


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Hi all,

I recently bought some maple from an area wood lot. The price was great and the owners were very nice.

I have 6 one piece slab cut backs, which I can handle.

I also have three logs, pictured here:

post-24710-0-07484300-1366640197_thumb.jpg

post-24710-0-36484000-1366640230_thumb.jpg

post-24710-0-07466600-1366640246_thumb.jpg

 

 

My question is how best to process these logs using the tools at hand, which are the usual hand tools and a 14" bandsaw. What is the best order of operation?

I would like to get two backs from each log, and as much rib stock as I can squeeze out of them.

There is a lumber mill nearby that could do it, but I'd rather do it myself and save some cash.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks!

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Argle,

 

I have a bad feeling about those checks.....  :( It may be too late to get any big pieces of wood out of that log.

 

I suggest splitting it into neck-sized  and rib-sized wedges as soon as you can and coating the endgrain immediately.  The smaller the piece, the less likely it is to check.

 

I like to use tightbond glue on the ends, but some folks prefer wax, and others use paint. 

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I don't have any advice about cutting but I would recommend reading up on storage and drying after it is cut.  I'm not trying to be a "Debbie Downer", but I just wrecked some nice wood due to improper storage.  Makes me sick to think about it after I went through all the work of cutting it, sealing the ends, etc. only to end up with wood for a campfire......

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Hi,

Your best course of action is to split the wood along the check lines. Drive some wedges into the splits and see what comes out.

One of the pieces have a rotten part that is no good for anything, however you might get a wedge out of the left side.

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Hi,,

 

I wouldn't split this at all,,

you could loose lots of usable wood instantly.

 

We need pictures with measurements from edge to center, at the cracks,,

and measurements between the cracks at the edge.

 

All the major cracking has happened,, don't make a mess of it by sealing it now,,,

 

You need to be able to see what you are doing.

Just mark and cut,,,,

 

I can't tell how big it is,,,

It is nicely figured for sure,,,,be careful

 

but I see 8 or 9 backs there,,,

 

Get the measurements up and I'll tell you how to cut.

also show the other side please.

 

 

and the length.

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I've recently learned buying from trusted professional tonewood dealers saves money in the long run. One company comes to mind but they are not different than other companies who have been selling wood for generations. They know there business and how to handle ALL the aspects of cutting tonewood.

There may be good deals out there on wood, but for me I'd rather shell out the money to a trusted source and not worry what the wood might do.

 

http://www.tonewood.ch/index.html

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I don't have any advice about cutting but I would recommend reading up on storage and drying after it is cut.  I'm not trying to be a "Debbie Downer", but I just wrecked some nice wood due to improper storage.  Makes me sick to think about it after I went through all the work of cutting it, sealing the ends, etc. only to end up with wood for a campfire......

 

If it's any comfort(because misery loves company...), my uncle confiscated some improperly harvested tonewood last fall.  It added up to several cords of firewood.

 

(And wouldn't send it to me...stupid ethics/legality ;) )

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These particular logs aside...

 

My bandsaw is quite small, so I use an old Buck rip-saw to cut off big pieces. I keep it very sharp, with a small set. I split a thick one piece back into two the other day, a cut of about 17''x9''. It took about 15 minutes, including short breaks for swearing.

 

I can often eke out a lot more from a nice piece of wood with a bit of care and hard work. 

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I can often eke out a lot more from a nice piece of wood with a bit of care and hard work. 

 

 

crack by crack,,,

 

line upon line,,,,

 

here a little,,

 

and there a little,,,

 

will turn out fine.

 

You have to plan it out like a brain surgen,,,

 

and take out 1 piece at a time.

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I've recently learned buying from trusted professional tonewood dealers saves money in the long run. One company comes to mind but they are not different than other companies who have been selling wood for generations. They know there business and how to handle ALL the aspects of cutting tonewood.

There may be good deals out there on wood, but for me I'd rather shell out the money to a trusted source and not worry what the wood might do.

 

http://www.tonewood.ch/index.html

Amen!

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