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Wenzel Fuchs Violin


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Hello!

I'm a beginner-intermediate looking to get a new violin, and I found a Wenzel Fuchs violin for sale. There was a previous post about this violin, but it seems to talk about the master violin, and the ad I'm looking at says it's a Model 310. Does anybody know anything about this model or about the maker's violins in general? I am going to try this violin in person, but being kind of new to the whole violin buying business I thought I could use some help to see if this violin would be worth its weight. I do have pictures if that would help.

Thank you so much!  :D

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This is one of those personal stories that have little to do with anything:

 

I have  only seen one Wenzel Fuchs over the years. It was when I was in high school.  A fellow student, who was at the time one of our best talents, had a Fuchs.  One day I asked her what her violin was.  She paused and said, "It's a Wenzel."  It was a shiny nice "Germanic" looking violin.  Certainly better than most of us had at the time.  I asked to get a closer look. When I looked at the label, it said proudly: WENZEL FUCHS.  Well, the funny thing is that NO self-respecting young lady in 1950s west Texas would have dared to guess or even ask how to pronounce "Fuchs." So she ignored the "Fuchs" and called her violin a "Wenzel." :)  

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This is one of those personal stories that have little to do with anything:

 

I have  only seen one Wenzel Fuchs over the years. It was when I was in high school.  A fellow student, who was at the time one of our best talents, had a Fuchs.  One day I asked her what her violin was.  She paused and said, "It's a Wenzel."  It was a shiny nice "Germanic" looking violin.  Certainly better than most of us had at the time.  I asked to get a closer look. When I looked at the label, it said proudly: WENZEL FUCHS.  Well, the funny thing is that NO self-respecting young lady in 1950s west Texas would have dared to guess or even ask how to pronounce "Fuchs." So she ignored the "Fuchs" and called her violin a "Wenzel." :)

You could have asked her if she would like a nice “Wanker” bow to go with it
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LOL Perhaps I should have.  Who knows how history might have changed!   :)

Given my observations at the same time, you might have been expelled from high school and spent some time in Gatesville, except that no one in West Texas had heard the word in the 1950's except British war brides and a few vets. :lol:

 

Funny no one ever latches up on Ficker violins..........

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We're having too much fun here.   :)

 

I have been lead to believe that Fuchs is more in line with kooks than cooks or looks.  But maybe Jacob can set us straight.

 

I believe the wonderful violinist and violist, Joseph and Lillian Fuchs' names were usually pronounced "Fewks," in the U.S. at least.

 

Either way, in old west Texas Fuchs was just a little too close for comfort.  And damore is right that none of us had heard of Wanker.

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Lillian's niece is a close friend of mine and she makes it rhyme with "kooks".  On the other hand, I have friends with the same name, not related to Joseph and Lillian, who make it rhyme with "few".

"Fewks" (one wonders if an original umlaut has been lost) is what I'm used to, except where there's been some French influence and it's "Fewsh", as in "fuchsia".  The short "oo" ("book") pronunciation occurs in the name of that charming Austrian village in Tarsdorf municipality, and is standard, I believe, as in "buch".

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"Fewks" (one wonders if an original umlaut has been lost) is what I'm used to, except where there's been some French influence and it's "Fewsh", as in "fuchsia".  The short "oo" ("book") pronunciation occurs in the name of that charming Austrian village in Tarsdorf municipality, and is standard, I believe, as in "buch".

No umlauts lost I think.

 

But it's all about that the "ch" at the end of a word on english its treated like a "k" sound. It should be more like the starting sound on "who" plus a final "s"

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We're having too much fun here.   :)

 

...  But maybe Jacob can set us straight.

 

....

 Unless Jacob speaks a totally different dialect of high German than I do...I stand by my suggestion.  So there...;)

 

And if we're comparing different anglicized pronounciations of German names...then we're comparing apples to oranges...so we won't get past personal preference.

 

And let's not even get on the mangling of French names...we totally caved on that front ...

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Well, Rue—and I am joking here—I don't really know how you personally pronounce "cooks."

 

You're right to bring up a point which I was thinking about discussing, which is that Americans with names from "the old world" often butcher the pronunciation, either knowingly or not.  Bret Favre, may be the worst, just as an illustration.  We all can think of hundreds of examples if we think long enough.

 

Joseph and, I believe, Lillian Fuchs were born in NY.  And rcmacd (above knows how the family pronounces Fuchs).  I don't know if they were second or third generation. We certainly don't have to stand on correctness as Americans. On my mother's side, from Louisiana, the whole family pronounced Dupre "Dupree" instead of "Dupray."

 

The only reason I mentioned Jacob is because he is the only person in the thread that I knew lives in Germany.

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I am curious to know if spoken German is as varied  as French seems to be or American English, from Maine to Alabama, for example.

Certainly. I can remember being very amused once, as the North German television channel broadcast an interview with Hermann Maier (an Austrian ski champion) with sub-titles, although he speaks just as clearly as anyone, to my Austian-conditioned ears.
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Thanks Jacob. We get subtitles here occasionally like that.

I grew up in Texas, but once I was traveling in rural Alabama when my car broke down, and after not understanding the repairman and asking him 4 or 5 times to repeat himself, I gave up and said, "Fix it." I was getting embarrassed and afraid I was going to offend him.

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I found the following excerpt recording the admission of another fellow of that surname as a master in the guild.

 

post-55791-0-29925600-1364969053_thumb.jpg

 

 

Two things of interest here, one is that when he was accepted he presented the Guild with half a barrel of beer (capital fellow!, I'd certainly vote for him :) ), and that he was admitted more cheaply apparently because he was a professional soldier at the time.  Anyone who survived the Deconet thread will see the implications of this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

I happen to have two Fuchs 16" violas, purchased about 40 years apart: one a W.K. Fuchs master art c. 1948-54 and the other a Wenzel Fuchs 1954. Both are Erlangen instruments. I was told W.K. stood for Wenzel Karl. I don't know if the are by the same maker or not. The W.K. has a violin-type scroll and the Wenzel has a cello-type scroll. Both instruments are actually quite well-made, and both have a beautiful sound.

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