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Arash

Titian's CT scan & dust in the workshop

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Hello,

 

This is a multi-question post:

 

1. Few days ago I received my Titian poster and was positively surprised by the CT scan provided on the back of the poster. I am wondering how accurate these CT scans are with regards to mould measurements. Can I just trace the inside of the rib structure pictured there and assume that this gives me the actual size of the mould? If so, these scans fantastically reduce the work that is involved in sizing the mould from the outlines provided in the other posters.

 

2. I have a question for those who have set up a workshop space at home or in their office space. If you don't have a dedicated room for violin making how do you tackle the dust issue? I have an office space at home with books, computers and instruments and am wondering whether I might be able to set up a little workshop space in there. I realise that some of the dustier work has to be carried out in the garden or elsewhere, but what about the rest? Can an office and a workshop coexist peacefully within the same undivided space?

 

3. Not a question, just an observation: a while ago I started thinking about a model for a viola and received some really useful help from Manfio. It made me realise that his space here on maestro.net has been left empty. I don't want to start a debate about his absence or the admin's decision, which led to his leaving the forum. I just wanted to share my observation and acknowledge the impact these professional luthiers have here.

 

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A friend set up all his dust-generating (motorized) equipment in a closet.  Granted the space was (slightly) larger than most conventional closets, but if you happen to have something like that, it would work.  This same fellow keeps his office and workshop apart separated by a wall.  Best to keep the desk separate from your bench and keep all the sharp tools localized.

 

Keep in mind too plenty of wood, including ebony, are allergens (quinones->dermatitis).

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If you are doing any power sanding or cutting make sure you get an appropriate dust collector.  The dust collector's most important job is not to keep your shop clean but to collect the particulate matter in the air that will damage your lungs.

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I would guess the ct scans are very accurate, just remember the instrument is old and possibly deformed by age, so pick one half and make a mirror image, also consider the top may be flattened out with time, just some ideas to think about.

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Arash;

Even some hand operations, like scraping a top, will generate quite a bit of fine dust, which will wind up everywhere. You can take care of it with a shop vac with a brush on the end, but it's a lot of work cleaning all those complex surfaces.

 

Here's something I've used a few times if there aren't loose papers and other light objects laying about:

Put an exhaust fan on the window, and blow the room down with a leaf blower. You will probably need to restrict the intake of the blower to reduce output velocity. It won't get everything, but it will take care of all the dust which can easily become re-airborn.

 

Regarding your item #3:

There are at least 20 high-level (world-class?) experts who are members on this site; also a high number who are full-time pros in various aspects of the trade; also quite a few who contribute high-level and  valuable input from experience in other fields. There is no other site that comes close. That may not be what everyone is looking for, but it works for me.

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Regarding dust: if you don't use much sand paper and sanding drums etc., I don't think fiddle making generates that much. Scrapers should create shavings, not a lot of flying dust.

I have all of my books and laptop in the workshop with no problems. I also warnish in the same room. However, if oil varnishing I consider what to do the last hour(s) before picking up the brush.

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Arash I feel your pain regarding the issue of dust.

 

I'm an amateur and making violins in a domestic environment and this can be tricky. Working with hand tools minimized dust but normal hand tool operations still generate a lot of dust.

 

Lee valley has a filter you can attach to the back of a fan. Never tried it but it is something that may work in a domestic environment.

 

Regarding number 3, as David notes there are many professionals and very talented amateurs who post here. Each has their own expertise and value to add.

 

Good luck

 

Chris

post-45462-0-49148300-1360847919_thumb.jpg

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I've used a regular air filter taped to a box fan. It helped reduce the dust but the lee valley filter looks much better. The advantage with something like the box fan is that it can be run continuously since it's very quiet and cheap to operate. You can also move closer to the source of dust.  A really good shop vac (Fein) is also very helpful.

 

Oded

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those Fein shop vacs look very cook Oded. I'm embarrassed to say that my shop is so small I don't have room for a normal sized shop vac!

 

One thing i was thinking of was adding a tool tray to my bench with a movable hatch. By putting a trash can under the hatch one could sweep shavings and dust on the bench into the tool tray and then directly into the can. In theory this might reduce the amount of airborne stuff. Someone posted a picture of a vintage bench like this a while back but I cant remember who -- might have been Melvin

 

Chris

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Thanks for your feedback, everyone. So far, I have generated the most dust while filing, and it is enough to settle everywhere, which is why I am hesitant "to set up shop" in the office. My wife doesn't let me partition the sitting and dining areas :), so I have been thinking about partitioning the office with plexiglass. This might be the only practical solution for me. And the Lee Valley filter looks like a good solution.

 

Regarding #3: I see that my use of "professional luthiers" may be read as excluding others who are active on MN. It was not my intention to exclude anyone. Quite the opposite: I am thankful to all who share expertise and experience on MN. This is an amazing space.

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I would guess the ct scans are very accurate, just remember the instrument is old and possibly deformed by age, so pick one half and make a mirror image, also consider the top may be flattened out with time, just some ideas to think about.

 

Thanks for this. Yes, I am going to mirror one "good" half. I am actually not attempting an artistic or one-to-one copy of the Titian. I use the poster as a starting point and a base.

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Oh, since you have a computer in the office space you are planning to use, shut it down when you're making a lot of dust. With the fan-forced ventilation, they can crud up inside rather quickly. Ask me how I know. :)

 

The computer repair guy was slightly offended when he took it apart.

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Oh, since you have a computer in the office space you are planning to use, shut it down when you're making a lot of dust. With the fan-forced ventilation, they can crud up inside rather quickly. Ask me how I know. :)

 

The computer repair guy was slightly offended when he took it apart.

 

As long as the dust accumulated inside the computer does not show up on the screen of your computer, it cannot be that bad :)

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Working in a small space most of the time I do find that a fair amount of fine dust is generated.  I collect what I can at the source (bandsaw, etc) and use a small shop vac periodically to clean up.  Very small airborn wood dust isn't controlled by these means so I supplement them with a small shop air filter (pictured) that is quiet and efficient for my space.  If you're lucky enough to have a large workspace then one of the more conventional ceiling mounted shop air cleaners would be more suitable, though they generate a lot of noise compared to this little guy.  One other note:  when using sandpaper on ebony I always use wet or dry paper with water so that no airborn ebony dust is generated.  This works better than dry sanding anyway-the paper is easily unclogged with a toothbrush and a little tub of water so it doesn't load up.  It seems to cut smoother and faster with the water.  Black fingers are a lot better than getting ebony dust in your respiratory tract.

 

Good luck.

post-26190-0-88028500-1360861187_thumb.jpg

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See 0:50 of this video for dust extraction close to the source, though I am unsure how well this method would work for the different stages of the violin making process:

 

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