Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

I thought this looked familiar!


stephen maloney
 Share

Recommended Posts


 


 


 


Same junk/ different sellers—I assume—stressing different things in different ways.  The most I can get out of a study of this latest sad episode in the never-ending saga is that most of these sellers don't know very much and they feed off of each other, and, sadly, off of us.


 


For example, in recent times they have become aware that having blocks is good and not having blocks is bad; so with this violin it has become stressed that it is "fully blocked and lined."  A mantra that will last a while until another becomes fashionable.  Reminds me of "Animal Farm."  Something like:  FOUR BLOCKS GOOD, TWO BLOCKS BAD.


 


I feel a poem coming on:


 


"FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED,


FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED,"


THE CRIER SOLD FROM HIS CART:


"VIOLINS,


FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED!"


 


THE LADIES FROM THEIR WINDOWS


SHOUTED DOWN AT HE:


"THEY ARE PRETTY, SIR, AND SHINEY,


BUT ARE THEY


FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED?"


 


I don't care much about legalities, but I do care about kids having to play on the junk that misguided, ignorant parents buy possibly because of such pablum as the following regarding this specific instrument:


 


"Nicely worked F-holes."


"...a lovely chunk of wood some unknown luthier decided would make a nice violin."


"The maple grafted scroll was purposely roughly worked to match the back."    —the first seller, who, after offering how wonderful the different strings sound, states he is not a player or dealer.  (Edit:  as pointed out in post #7, the seller states he IS a player) 


 


"Only the most superior wood was used for this instrument."


"You can tell that is a really old instrument just by looking at its gorgeous scroll and excellent patina."   —the second dealer 


 


If these samples don't represent the worst level of using buzz words in a totally meaningless way, I don't know what else would.


 


Anyone who is swayed to buy based on such gibberish deserves what they get, of course. But for kids to have to struggle with this stuff is another matter.


 


 


 


 


 


Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Same junk/ different sellers—I assume—stressing different things in different ways.  The most I can get out of a study of this latest sad episode in the never-ending saga is that most of these sellers don't know very much and they feed off of each other, and, sadly, off of us.

 

For example, in recent times they have become aware that having blocks is good and not having blocks is bad; so with this violin it has become stressed that it is "fully blocked and lined."  A mantra that will last a while until another becomes fashionable.  Reminds me of "Animal Farm."  Something like:  FOUR BLOCKS GOOD, TWO BLOCKS BAD.

 

I feel a poem coming on:

 

"FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED,

FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED,"

THE CRIER SOLD FROM HIS CART:

"VIOLINS,

FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED!"

 

THE LADIES FROM THEIR WINDOWS

SHOUTED DOWN AT HE:

"THEY ARE PRETTY, SIR, AND SHINEY,

BUT ARE THEY

FULLY BLOCKED AND LINED?"

 

I don't care much about legalities, but I do care about kids having to play on the junk that misguided, ignorant parents buy possibly because of such pablum as the following regarding this specific instrument:

 

"Nicely worked F-holes."

"...a lovely chunk of wood some unknown luthier decided would make a nice violin."

"The maple grafted scroll was purposely roughly worked to match the back."    —the first seller, who, after offering how wonderful the different strings sound, states he is not a player or dealer. 

 

"Only the most superior wood was used for this instrument."

"You can tell that is a really old instrument just by looking at its gorgeous scroll and excellent patina."   —the second dealer 

 

If these samples don't represent the worst level of using buzz words in a totally meaningless way, I don't know what else would.

 

Anyone who is swayed to buy based on such gibberish deserves what they get, of course. But for kids to have to struggle with this stuff is another matter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brilliant !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

  —the first seller, who, after offering how wonderful the different strings sound, states he is not a player or dealer. 

 

 

 

Just to correct the above misquote, the first seller stated, "I am a player, not a dealer," not, "the first seller...states he is not a player or dealer."  So perhaps he has some ability to describe the sound.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve, actually the label was not swapped, it is there on the original purchase so he did not swap them.

 

Correct, I understand that, Dan.  What I was pointing out was how one $400+ violin is now being hyped/oversold a couple weeks later as a $4000+ violin, and the seller hasn't even changed the strings on it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Correct, I understand that, Dan.  What I was pointing out was how one $400+ violin is now being hyped/oversold a couple weeks later as a $4000+ violin, and the seller hasn't even changed the strings on it.  

You should be praising their economy of effort! Why add value when you can add a decimal place and a few lines of drivel?  :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...