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Electric Glue Pot Alternatives


Gleo
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I'm not sure if this has been posted before but I found a great link on a clock restoration site. The article shows how to make a glue pot under 20 dollars as an alternative to the more expensive electric glue pots available to luthiers. It also discusses freezing left over hide glue in ice cube trays to preserve it for future use.

 

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http://www.xrestore.com/Pages/HideGlue.htm

 

 

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Another alternative is the microwave.  I have one in the shop, $10 at a garage sale.

 

About 30 ml of glue (disolved in water and properly gelled)... 12-15  seconds and you're in business.

 

I've tested joints repeatedly for strength vs. glue pot joints and could not detect any difference.

 

Of course you can easily overheat the glue with too much time, but it's really easy to learn how much time is required for a given volume of glue.

 

It's instant, convenient, and you can re-warm your coffee with it.

 

Best regards,

 


E

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Keenan,

 

I have this pot. I measured the temp accurately. If you set the dial to the lowest temp. setting, then plug in the unit, the temp goes way above and then slowly back down. If the final, settled temp is 140F, you don't want the pot to get to 170 F before it settles.

 

The microwave idea is neat.

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The microwave idea is neat.

With the low volume of my operation, I use the microwave for most small jobs.  I try to use the minimum heating time; if it's not hot enough, I can always zap it a couple more seconds.  For necks or plates, I fire up the pot.

 

For even smaller jobs, like a nut, saddle, or similar, I'll put a tiny chunk of gelled glue on the part, then hold it under my 50 watt high-intensity desk lamp for several seconds until it melts.

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I gave the microwave recipe a couple of weeks back : http://www.maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/327636-restoring-a-violin-for-the-first-time/?hl=microwave#entry571580  Because at that time I was trying to show a newb how easy some of this can be, I didn't add the following.  Once the glue in the coffee cup is liquified, you can place it in a pot of hot water on a burner or hotplate to keep it at a good working temperature (which can be monitored with a candy thermometer).  With this arrangement, to me,  the traditional glue pot seems superfluous.

 

Rather than refrigerate my leftover glue, I leave it in a bowl as a thin layer and dry it out again, then crush it up in a mortar to get it back to granular form.  Properly kept, the stuff seems immortal.

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Well, I use a lot of glue each week, i have a crock pot with water and just have glass jars with different strengths in the hot water bath, just keep it on low all day and that seems to hold the right temperature. I have used rheostat adjustors on the cords to fine tune the temp but don't seem to need it with this one right now.

 

Reese

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I suppose one should be neither shocked nor surprised that a nation that manufactures battery operated airliners, also has micro-waved glue

>Was würden Sie vorschlagen Jacob?

 

My “glue pot” is a saucepan with water in it, in which I place a jam-jar of glue. When I need to glue anything, I warm it on the electric hot plate (set at no. 1). This works to sublime perfection, so that I am unsure in regard to what I should make any “Vorschläge
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I also the microwave for small amounts for add jobs. My usual glue pot is now an electric gravy boat from Aldi, which cost $12. It is a ceramic base with a small element and a ceramic gravy boat which sits on top. I keep wondering if anyone in Australia actually purchased one for its intended purpose :-)

Tim

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The obvious problem with microwaving is you have virtually no control over the glues temperature, when you initially heat it you're probably going well over 140F which is supposed to be bad for the glue strength, then after its heated you have no way of holding the glue right at 140F till you use it, which means the glue is probably cooler than 140F and less liquid. Also as I see it there is no provision for strengthening or weakening the glue, without reheating. A pretty standard part of glue usage.

 

Much simpler to do as Jacob says and heat up simmering, not boiling water in a pot with a  small glass food jar sitting inside(I use baby food jars) temperature tested to 140F, once you figure out what heat setting on your stove or hot plate produces 140F in the glue jar, there is no need to constantly check the temperature

 

Obviously the microwave appeals to the too lazy to do it properly crowd, but it doesnt to appeal to the requirements of properly heated, not overheated glueing, and represents a big step backwards in technology IMO

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My “glue pot” is a saucepan with water in it, in which I place a jam-jar of glue. When I need to glue anything, I warm it on the electric hot plate (set at no. 1). This works to sublime perfection, so that I am unsure in regard to what I should make any “Vorschläge

 

Yeh, Me too although the bottom of my saucepan is lined with an arbitary 3mm of wood.....I don't think there is a need for sophistication here. It's important to not get the glue too hot...I use the feel of heat on my fingers as a control....As hot as a finger can bear is as far as I take the heat.

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Baby bottle warmer. Some have an evaporative recovery system so they don't need to be refilled with water during the day. They can't over heat. Mine has a control knob so I can keep it on 'warm', then when I need hot glue I crank it up and it's ready in under a minute. I use glass baby bottles and put glass marbles in the jar so I can move the glue jar near my work and the additional mass will maintain the heat. You can often find these at thrift stores for a $1 or 2.

 

I'm a bit leery of microwave ovens for this purpose because they tend to heat up small areas to high temperatures and depend on diffusion to warm up the rest. But if you've been getting good results over a long period of time it's probably  ok.

 

Oded 

 

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Here's mine.  The hot water is handy for a lot of stuff, as is the steam. There's a homemade aluminum trivet in the bottom, a notch on the dial at the setting that keeps the glue at 140. I also use the hotplate for straightening bows. I'm pretty absent-minded, so I put the hotplate on a $15 adjustable cutoff timer so it shuts off automatically.  I make very small batches of glue, heat it up just about every day, and replace it frequently. Never needed anything more.

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A few years ago my parents got a free mini crockpot when they bought a full sized one. They gave it to me since they had no use for it. I cut a hole in the lid and inserted a small plastic bottle, this one happened to be a yeast bottle like this http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/homebrew.html , and ever since I've had a near perfect glue warmer.

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