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Ex-Vieutemps del gesu---The best


zanjia
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Will, you can't avoid confusion. Vieuxtemps had two from the same year: both very prominent fiddles

In all, Vieuxtemps owned six del Gesu's and the same number of Strads as well as other things.

 

Cozio.com gives 4 Strads and 3 del Gesu with which Henri V. was associated.

 

http://www.cozio.com/owner.aspx?id=480

 

Wonder what the other ones may have been?

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The Cannone like the Messiah and a very small number of particularly important instruments that have miraculously come down to the present day in exceptional condition and that should remain that way will only be possible if they are permanently kept out of the hands of a soloist with consequent continuous playing. If the Messiah had been played on continuously from Vuillaumes time until today it would be unrecognisable and miles from being the pristine example of one of the greatest violin makers of all time. The Cannone would also be hugely different.

Bruce, Would you include the Lady Blunt in that short list of other instruments ( & La Purcelle?)? I think there is also a small Brothers Amati viola (1620?) too?

Just curious.

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Cozio.com gives 4 Strads and 3 del Gesu with which Henri V. was associated.

 

http://www.cozio.com/owner.aspx?id=480

 

Wonder what the other ones may have been?[/quot

Ah you got me! Well done!

I searched Vieuxtemps the wrong way, just popped his name into the search-bar, so got the wrong answer. As usual, Omobono... I can't get a moment of sloppyness past you!

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Bruce, Would you include the Lady Blunt in that short list of other instruments ( & La Purcelle?)? I think there is also a small Brothers Amati viola (1620?) too?

Just curious.

The 'Lady Blunt' certainly qualifies as does the 1620 Brothers Amati contralto viola, 'La Pucelle' too is a fine example but making a specific list is very hard and probably misses the point. The relatively small numbers of instruments in collections means that all the others are available for musicians.

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Thanks, Bruce. Some might argue the number of instruments in collections or out of circulation is not that small,

but not need to go there on this thread......

 

This I presume is the Amati brothers Contralto (seem to recall it was featured in the Strad magazine a good number of years back)

 

888gx.jpg

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Lets deal with Berl's question first. The measurements are in the Biddulph book. I am sorry that it costs so much. I never wanted that to happen from the start, but the production costs simply spiraled out of control. None of the writers earned a bean. So no bean-stalk either. I would like it to be reproduced in a cheaper version, but that is not my decision.I have published what I can on the net I can't do much more.

As for loss of tone. NO - Neil and Bruce are absolutely right. The very best instruments that have come down to us have been kept away from players and restorers for some considerable time in their history. They have gained rather than lost from this experience.

Now and this bit is extra hard; DBurns (I wish I knew who all these people are) says. "So working violins always stand a chance of improving by being taken care of with expert hands" 

​Actually the greatest damage to antique violins has not been perpetrated by players - but by repairers and restorers. Anyone want to argue? 

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As for instruments deterioration through not having been played, I might tell you of my occasional meetings with Ricci. He once told me that as a young man he won the right to play the 'Cannone' in a concert. He had two days to practice and so he began early on the morning of the previous day. After an hour he was almost in tears and asked if he could use his own violin for the concert. On being told that this was impossible he persevered with the 'Cannone'. At some point a guard approached him and asked if he might stop playing. When asked why, the guard said, "Because it is midnight and we want to go home". He had become so engrossed that he had lost all track of time. Several years after he told me this story, I was assembling the del Gesu exhibition in New York with John Dilworth. Most of the invited soloists initially expressed dissatisfaction with the 'Cannone'. One told me that I must make a new bridge and sound-post. On being told that this would not be allowed, he commented that the instrument was unplayable. At this point Ricci arrived. He saw the 'Cannone' and  greeted it with the words, "Ah! My old friend!"  He picked it up and started playing. The sound seemed almost to raise the roof. Of all the instruments played in those private sessions, for me, this was to very best. When he finally put the violin down there was a clamor. The gentleman who had just told me that the violin was unplayable, came to remind me that he was the first on the list to play the 'Cannone' in the concert hall.  

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Synesthesia, Yes. And thanks. I was always made fun of also in ensembles due to the fact I couldn't respond while someone was talking to me while playing music in a trio or quartet like talking back and forth. I simply had too much color going on in the brain at the same time and couldn't speak. I'm not saying I have waterfall displays going on in my mind its different than that. 

Its as bright as staring at a light, then closing your eyes, and seeing the afterimage, and right before it is too dim, as the rods and cones adjust to the light - take an instrument and then watch that afterimage start changing color but its not your eyes. And then its pretty much connected to the language center of the brain some how or another. 


Met a bass player who played jazz who understood me once at the University of North Texas. We sat and talked for hours about hillarious moments where he got so wrapped up tight in the music that he had issues drooling. :blink:

 

I have talked with some in person that describe it as color bursts, zigzags, something like designs of a kiwi fruit cut in half that change shapes but are monochrome (black and white) in a similar fashion to a color burst, and them some that only have speech problems and no color bursts. My favorite musician was one woman who would complain to me to tune my violin because it was "too blue - TOO BLUE" 

No waterfall displays in the brain but as I see it its more flat to me. Like I can look down on it on a table and see it on a piece of paper.


 

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 I was always made fun of also in ensembles due to the fact I couldn't respond while someone was talking to me while playing music in a trio or quartet like talking back and forth. I simply had too much color going on in the brain at the same time and couldn't speak.

 

Vocal paralysis while playing is pretty common, I think, and not due to synesthesia, but because the motor signals for hands and voice (and probably some other facial muscles) come from the same part of the brain.  I don't have synesthesia, but I have a difficult time even saying "switch" or "out" during playing gigs.  Oddly, (or maybe not so odd), I have no difficulty at all reading an article while playing... but reading it out loud is impossible.

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Vocal paralysis while playing is pretty common, I think, and not due to synesthesia, but because the motor signals for hands and voice (and probably some other facial muscles) come from the same part of the brain.  I don't have synesthesia, but I have a difficult time even saying "switch" or "out" during playing gigs.  Oddly, (or maybe not so odd), I have no difficulty at all reading an article while playing... but reading it out loud is impossible.

Same here

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Do any of you who are gifted (afflicted?) with synesthesia perceive different colors depending on the instrument itself, not just the notes being played?  For example, after trying some different instruments you might say "That instrument is dark purple and that other one is light yellow".

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Vocal paralysis while playing is pretty common, I think, and not due to synesthesia, but because the motor signals for hands and voice (and probably some other facial muscles) come from the same part of the brain.  I don't have synesthesia, but I have a difficult time even saying "switch" or "out" during playing gigs.  Oddly, (or maybe not so odd), I have no difficulty at all reading an article while playing... but reading it out loud is impossible.

 

My experience with talking while playing is not that of complete vocal paralysis.  When playing string quartets I can speak to the other players about whether an upcoming repeat is to be observed or, if someone is lost I can tell them we are two measures before rehearsal letter A.  I suspect it is a combination of talent and practice.  Simultaneous translators (e.g. at the UN) can work in two different languages simultaneously.  And what about people who can sing and accompany themselves on guitar or piano?

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