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Madder root from different regions


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The colorant that I made is iron oxide based. I aerated turpentine with iron filings in it for a year. Afterward I cooked the turpentine until it was almost black. I thinned it with lavender oil. The color is blood red. I have yet to try it on scrap wood.

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The colorant that I made is iron oxide based. I aerated turpentine with iron filings in it for a year. Afterward I cooked the turpentine until it was almost black. I thinned it with lavender oil. The color is blood red. I have yet to try it on scrap wood.

 

You would need to cook it with a drying oil to make it into an oil varnish orthe wise it will be too hard.

 

Oded

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The colorant that I made is iron oxide based. I aerated turpentine with iron filings in it for a year. Afterward I cooked the turpentine until it was almost black. I thinned it with lavender oil. The color is blood red. I have yet to try it on scrap wood.

What you've made probably contains iron but that doesn't mean it contains iron oxide. Many iron based colors have a reputation for turning black with age while iron oxides are extremely stable.

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It's going to take more than those wimpy velvet handcuffs this time Joe. But I appreciate your attempt at restraining, I mean helping, me  :wacko:  :wub:  :lol:

 

Oded

Oded,

Just making sure you are still strong enough to break out of those cuffs...I found the remnants...........

 

But seriously.

Fractional distillation is interesting.   I have done a bit of this. 

It is an interesting way to look at the components of a resin. 

Finding practical uses for the random distillates is another story.  There is a lot of literature on the subject.  Industrial varnish making was never a get rich business so they all tried to find use for those things they threw away.  Kind of like the person who figured out a use for all those Oreo cookies that got crushed in the bakery and swept up and thrown away.....

I did a lot of work with Copal Oil.  [the oily stuff in the smoke when you are running copal] I was working on varnish fluidity and I thought this might work as a varnish additive.  It was effective to increase fluidity.  However the varnish layers peeled off one another like sunburned skin.

I advocated Pine Oil for a while as a flowing agent, but people used too much and it caused fish-eye.  I know several makers who use fir needle oil to good effect.  A flowing agent....not to thin the varnish.  They buy it in the aroma therapy stores.

 

It is a comfort to know we share addictions ...I mean curiosity....about the same things...but then I am not trying to make violins...or violas...or cellos...or the occasional bass....

on we go,

Joe

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Oh yes, definitely, Joe. I had no problem with the larch or the rosin in making the oil varnish. the only reason I tried with the benzoin I had cooked was the attractive red/brown color it took. But unfortunately I won't be able to make an oil varnish with it. Well I will stick to my larch varnish for some time then :)

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I'll have to try that. Do you lose any great quantity of the resin from long cooking times?

 

When I was  experimenting with the Nitric acid, I was adding it a few drops at a time with an eye dropper to the resin while it was cooking. Consequently, there was never any large quantity of acid there at any one time. If long cooking times yield the same result, I'm all for it.

 

The neighbors are using dog sleds this time of year, so by the time they arrive here to complain, I'll long have the fire out and the evidence safely put away. :)

When I am cooking collophony I loose lots of weight and quantity. I cannot put a figure on this but, probably at least seven eighths. Hope this answer is not too late.  

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Oh yes, definitely, Joe. I had no problem with the larch or the rosin in making the oil varnish. the only reason I tried with the benzoin I had cooked was the attractive red/brown color it took. But unfortunately I won't be able to make an oil varnish with it. Well I will stick to my larch varnish for some time then :)

 

Have you tested the cooked benzoin for color fastness? 

 

Oded

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I haven't done so (just used it diluted on some piece of rib to seal and see what happens with my own oil varnish). But I can put some on some piece of wood and let them by the window to see what happens with time.

 

be sure to have a control piece. Cut the sample in two, put away one half in a dark place then, after exposing the other piece to direct sunlight for a couple of weeks, compare the two halves.

 

Oded

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