Sign in to follow this  
vathek

cost of pernambuco for a bow

Recommended Posts

Just read this. Wouldn't have thought.

"It takes several tons of wood to make just a few hundred bows. That's why the wood for a single bow costs $250, he said."The 'he' is Peter Shaw, owner of Amati Violin Shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<p>Depends entirely on the quality of the blank ....

http://www.pernambuc...s/en-ca/d3.html<p>I suppose he means that several tons of pernambuco will only offer wood suitable for several hundred bows.

A Scottish sawmill I was involved with commissioned a study into wastage, and discovered that production of average quality furniture grade wood from average quality trees involved chucking away over 70% of the log. If you're producing sawn billets of superbly straight-grained wood, roughly bow-shaped, I suppose the wastage would be higher. But there'd be a lot of wood you could use for things other than bows .....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quite so, for timber you tend not to use the first meter, which is too compressed, don't use anything too knotted by branches, don't use branches, don't use twigs, roots, leaves... I'm not being flippant here ... companies like IKEA take the good timber, then the rest gets chipped and reconstituted giving them virtually 100% useage out of the tree! Helps keep their prices down too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The worst I've seen with spruce was 19 fiddle tops out of a 36" diameter tree.

and that was without excessive limbs.

and the grain appeared to run straight up the tree

a 30% tree is good,,,,50% is real,,real good.

I should probably add that very few trees are good enough for insturments anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's my understanding that Pernambuco is not a straight growing tree, and you have to sort through tons to find pieces straight enough to make bows. This isn't something new. Pernambuco was originally imported to Europe from Brazil for dying fabric. Bowmakers would go down to the docks to sort through the shipment to try to find straight pieces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You used to be able to find bow sticks for anywhere from 40 to 100 dollars depending on the run-out of grain and the stiffness and density. Now most are put through a Lucci test and that is used along with grain run-out and water immersion weight testing to sort quality. Heavy figure or run-out will give a higher Lucci as it disrupts the transmission. I would guess that the prices have doubled now along with everything else. I imagine a primo stick sold as a single purchase could go for 200 plus. I know someone who had a ton of pernambuco lumber that he bought from an old supplier. It took many years for the pile of wood to be picked over for the quality pieces. The best went quickly though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You used to be able to find bow sticks for anywhere from 40 to 100 dollars...I would guess that the prices have doubled now along with everything else. I imagine a primo stick sold as a single purchase could go for 200 plus.

I don't doubt your $200 figure. In 2002 I bought a few at $100 each for a bow making class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you sure heavy figure or runout gives a higher Lucchi reading??

I'm not sure of anything except for being not sure of anything. :) But seems to me I remember being told that by a friend who owns one and was reading a few of my sticks. Makes sense, straighter grain would transmit the signal quicker than something that would deviate it from one end to the other. I will bow to conflicting, informed opinion. It certainly takes more than just a Lucci meter to judge the desirability of a piece of wood. I think I was also told that knots will also slow down the signal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesnt faster tranmission of sound mean higher reading! So wouldnt anything that interfered with it result in a lower reading??

I dont have a lucchi meter or an expert by any means on speed of sound ,etc...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that is the way it works. Faster speed of sound transmission gives better readings. I think the final number is the length of the material being tested divided by the speed of sound transmission.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that is the way it works. Faster speed of sound transmission gives better readings. I think the final number is the length of the material being tested divided by the speed of sound transmission.

As i understand it, the higher the number the longer it takes. The reading is based on of the density of the wood. That's why some sticks are referred to as floaters and some sinkers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lucchi number is the speed of sound transmission through the wood, but a variety of calculations from this can be used to give other information about the stick blank. The reading directly from the meter is not what is marked on sticks when you buy them, that is calculated from what I mentioned before. Fiddle collector is correct, a higher Lucchi number such as 6000 means very fast transmission of sound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As i understand it, the higher the number the longer it takes. The reading is based on of the density of the wood. That's why some sticks are referred to as floaters and some sinkers.

Yeah. I got that one wrong. The speed that gives a higher reading is indicative of a stiffer stick. That combined with a density indicater can give you an idea if a stck can be taken down to a desirable thickness in terms of weight and still not turn in to a "noodle". I said that I would bow to a more informed opinion. I do remember the notion that run out would give a lower reading. Maybe that's just because run -out makes for less of a stiffie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.