Sign in to follow this  
pold

Spring clamps instead of spool clamps?

Recommended Posts

There are Chinese knock offs that work just fine (that's what I own). Search "violin 32 Pc clamps" on google or eBay and you'll find them fairly quickly. They will typically play games with the shipping price but you will usually pay about $150 shipped for a set. Way better than $450 for herdim.

http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=110680524050

Edit: difrangia beat me to it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If everyone else in the trade does something the same way and you come up with something different you may be a genius but more likely you're headed in the wrong direction. There are nice closing clamps made by Herdim (very expensive), spool clamps, or if you are fast enough the old fashioned six piece garland clamps are available from International violin and others and are fairly cheap. Spring clamps are not the way to go for this job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only spring clamps I use for closing are Jorgenson Pony #3252 (normally I use spool clamps). Spring tension is adjustable from 0-50 lbs. I have four that get almost constant use. I use them on the end blocks and sometimes for closing short loose seams, along with several non-closing uses. The only problem I've found is the cost. List is about $8.50 each.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

those bar clamps are pretty crappy if they are like the ones that harbor freight sells also.

Agreed, those bar clamps are absolute rubbish.

The only ratchet bar clamps I recommend are Irwin.

I also have some of the Harbor Freight bar clamps. They are slightly different from the ones with the break-away triggers: the Harbor Freight clamp uses a buttery plastic trigger with a sloppy fit that gets even sloppier if you overload it, making it impossible to get even minimal clamping force. It's kindof annoying that these inexpensive, handy-sized clamps are so poorly designed, and continue to be made that way, when it really wouldn't cost more to make them moderately functional.

I haven't tried the Irwin small bar clamp yet. Hopefully they are better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you think 25LBS of pressure is too much and crack the plate?

Heck yeah. I would venture to say that I use about 1/10 of that pressure with closing clamps is plenty. Can't imagine that you wouldn't crack it. jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think international sells 30 spool clamps for about $60, these spring clamps are much more expensive, dangerous, and way too heavy etc etc etc, theres a right way and a wrong way to do some of this stuff, if you insist on being wrong, then you can suffer the consequences!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If one of them clamps gets away and pops off,,,

It could break an edge off ,,,,,,or crack the ribs as it snaps shut,,and then fly across the room.

Be sure to leave a note so if someone finds you knocked out on the floor by flying spring clamps,,,

They'll know what happened... :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sprung spools work ok, easy to make. Just need extra long threaded bar, an extra spool, and a 'not too strong' spring.

Padding the jaws of the spools with rubber washers works well.

Here :

http://www.flickr.co...157624777585537

Neat idea, Ben. Could be super-quick to apply with one hand. And the idea would also probably work for the edge-bridging clamps commonly used by repairers

Maybe something for a short article in The Strad Trade Secrets?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heck yeah. I would venture to say that I use about 1/10 of that pressure with closing clamps is plenty. Can't imagine that you wouldn't crack it. jeff

25LBS are the metal ones. But the plastic ones are not that strong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think international sells 30 spool clamps for about $60, these spring clamps are much more expensive, dangerous, and way too heavy etc etc etc, theres a right way and a wrong way to do some of this stuff, if you insist on being wrong, then you can suffer the consequences!!

Believe it or not I tried the medium size on a spare rib and they went flawlessly. They don't fly across the room and they don't snap anything, they are pretty stable, they were staying on the edge of the rib for 2 hours, I repeat, no bending and no marks on the rib.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you thought about what kind of access you'll have to get in there and clean excess glue from the joint, or push the ribs into shape if needed, with the handles sticking out to the sides 160 mm?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you thought about what kind of access you'll have to get in there and clean excess glue from the joint, or push the ribs into shape if needed, with the handles sticking out to the sides 160 mm?

When fitting the back I would clean the excess glue with warm damp brush, for the belly I read that the glue must be thinner, with consistency of the milk, so I wouldn't leave any excess glue inside. In the C&J they suggest to remove the two adjacent clamps when inserting the parting knife, so I think that if you use spring clamps you can remove and replace them even quicker, for everything, even pushing the ribs into shape. I wouldn't need even those bulky G clamps in the endblocks...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When fitting the back I would clean the excess glue with warm damp brush, for the belly I read that the glue must be thinner, with consistency of the milk, so I wouldn't leave any excess glue inside. In the C&J they suggest to remove the two adjacent clamps when inserting the parting knife, so I think that if you use spring clamps you can remove and replace them even quicker, for everything, even pushing the ribs into shape. I wouldn't need even those bulky G clamps in the endblocks...

Uhmmm, OK. If you have a little spare time, read the entire thread again, paying particular attention to the people who have done this many times before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want to appear arrogant, I deeply value the opinions of you all, experienced and amateurs, otherwise I wouldn't even be asking anything. I am ready to take risks and learn from mistakes. It wasn't difficult to sacrifice a spare rib for an experiment, the rib is still intact after hours, here is some pics I took with a "can of mackerel"...

post-29508-0-93057900-1357168319_thumb.jpg

post-29508-0-81454800-1357168324_thumb.jpg

post-29508-0-68835000-1357168329_thumb.jpg

post-29508-0-92027400-1357168333_thumb.jpg

post-29508-0-77207000-1357168336_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ernie,,,,,ya seem to be speechless,, :lol:

:) ...I had a chance to use the Herdim clamps for the first time today. Well worth the investment...These make closing much more enjoyable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do use these on the end blocks with a wooden caul against the spruce.

I have had them leave dents.

If you finish the edges and place the peak on the edge, it is very delicate,

These clamps will leave horrible dents in the edge and destroy life as we know it.

If you are going to build like strad did it..

then these will work fine,,because the edge is unfinished when the box is closed and there is plenty of flat surface to clamp on to.

But if you want to make them real fine,,,,,for not much more bucks,,just a little more time,,,

get some "shoe goo" ,,,

and tape a cavity around the pad,,several layers and trim it to fit around the edge(think concrete forms) fill it with substance of a rubbery drying nature,,

now have the clamp wedged open to give about a 1/4" gap from the top of the fiddle, then use a wedge to adjust the distance of the pad with the glue in it,,from the other side.

Cover a fiddle with saran wrap,,several layers,,(no leaks)

Then cut out a ring of fabric and place it on the fiddle around the edge,,,pull it tight around the edge so the "gookem-puckey" will flow around the edge to give the clamps a stopping point so you can place them exactly right where they go.

With the right fabric on them you can use them on varnished insturments also.(only if they are not too strong)

With the "shoe goo" you can prime the fabric ahead of each clamp as you glue it so the fabric is covered out to the edge of the clamp area,them you can trim them off clean with a sharp knife when they are cured. Watch for the time the goo is starting to set,,then push the wedge in a little further between the other jaw and the fiddle,,,, to tighten the newly forming pad against the fiddle,,,,

that way you'll get a good impression.

then place the clamps where you want them,,give it a few days to dry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:) ...I had a chance to use the Herdim clamps for the first time today. Well worth the investment...These make closing much more enjoyable.

More Enjoyable is the perfect word!

It really does !!!

It's kinda like they jump up there for you !!

No Fuss NO Muss,,,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.