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Arash

Fresh wood

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Wolfjk,

You have a lot of ideas that are logical from your experience. It is a great starting point for learning. This is where I am for violin making. However, logic will only take you so far. Next you have to either test your hypothesis or learn from a credible source. As you acquire knowledge, what is logical to you will change. For example:

You wrote "Isn’t carbon dioxide a by-product of photosynthesis and escape through the leafs?"

No, CO2 is absorbed through the leaves during photosynthesis and the by product is carbohydrate, 6CO2 + 6H2O + Energy --> C6H12O6 + 6O2. The oxygen released during photosythesis is from the water molecules not the carbon dioxide. Good luck.

-Jim

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Jim Bress

You sound like you actually know what you're talking about . Are you a botanist? I apreciate the info about the xylem and phloem layers am I correct however that there is not much transport of nutrients inward toward the center of the tree? What about the ray structures how are they involved in this?

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What's the benefit of the bark for your work?

fw,

We were mostly cutting for the cabinet trade. The requirement is for the most matching grain. The boule cut leaves live edges on the planks. Leaving the bark on slows down the moisture loss from the sap wood and helps protect against cupping.

Here is a nice Cuban mahogany log.

Another good information source is: http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/ ...The Forest Products Research Lab.

on we go,

Joe

post-6284-0-45928200-1357174597_thumb.jpg

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fw,

We were mostly cutting for the cabinet trade. The requirement is for the most matching grain. The boule cut leaves live edges on the planks. Leaving the bark on slows down the moisture loss from the sap wood and helps protect against cupping.

Here is a nice Cuban mahogany log.

Another good information source is: http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/ ...The Forest Products Research Lab.

on we go,

Joe

post-6284-0-45928200-1357174597_thumb.jpg

Interesting. Thanks Joe. Didn't know that.

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Hi Nathan,

I am an Ecologist. So I study plants as a component of the ecosystem that includes animals, microbes and abiotic factors. Yes you are correct. The tree is mostly dead cells inward of the cambrium made up of layers of xylem cells that will continue to transport water (vertical from root to leaf) until cavitation occurs. The phloem and xylem ray cells are for horizontal transport beween the cambrium and the bark to supply water and nutrients to daughter (new) phloem cells (outward) and daughter xylem cells (inward).

-Jim

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Nathan,

I made it back to the office today and was able to fact check myself. :o Radial water transport can occur by diffusion along a pressure gradiant via xylem tracheids. Tracheids have lateral pores called pits that allow radial water transport to adjacent xylem tracheids to mitagate air bubbles and cavitation. In the absence of a radial gradiant xylem tracheids function as xylem cells for axial water transport.

-Jim

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