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Jeffrey Holmes

What's on your bench? (mk6)

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Constructing 12 violins at once is indeed a daunting venture which I would recommend to no one. The reason I did so, during 2011-2012, is the following: I wrote a book on violinmaking (see my site www.kreitpatrick.com) that I released 2 years ago. To finalize the second, definitive edition, I practiced what I preached.

Thanks for your answers to the various questions above. You have great stamina and discipline making twelve of the exact same model at one time, I would be tempted to make at least one slightly different even if it was just the colour of the varnish. I'm curious to know what you are working on at the moment?  Another Betts copy?  :)

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To: Ernie Mantel

Re:  Popote

 

Popote can be bought in Paris, but can also be made at home. I am on vacation now and don't have the recipe with me, but will post it here when I get back home.

 

Patrick Kreit

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I see that you are using an outside mould?

 

I found this recipe for "popote" on the web.

water

camphor alcohol

turpentine (spirit of)

hydrochloric acid

"blanc de Meudon" (essentialy carbonate calcium powder)

 

I don't know if this is what you are using.

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Thanks Patrick, I would like to have that recipe and learn more about how you use it. Isn't Popote a grass used to make brooms?  And are you using it with pumice powder and oil?

I like using a short stiff hog bristle brush dipped in pumice and oil on the spruce. It helps preserve some texture too, but the Popote sounds interesting and your results look very good.

 

-Ernie

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Patrick, all the same model ?
You have the begginings of a chamber orchestra there....

Mike, thanks.
The purfling I buy from Dicktum, pearwood and maple. I used to make it with ebony etc.
I squashed the purfling thinner using the shaft of a thick screwdriver, got it down to 0.8 mm !
very easy to bend, and It expands to fill the groove.
Left it a bit thicker on the front, since I was hastey in doing the channel, (1 hour) so it was fractionaly wider.

Cheers.

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Isn't Popote a grass used to make brooms? 

 

-Ernie

 

I read this on the web, yes. But I believe in the lutherie world, the "popote" is the polishing mix. the word means what "popote" usually means in french, that is it's a slang word for a "prepared meal". As an extension it  later meant a mix of "something."

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Robert:


"Popote" or "Popote du Faubourg," for which each cabinet-maker had his own recipe, is jargon from the Faubourg Saint-Antoine (the cabinet-makers’ district in Paris).  What you mention is a variation of "Popote du Faubourg.

 

I use a different recipe:


Water:  800 centiliters

Industrial alcohol (90°): 80 gr

Blanc d’Espagne (whiting): 65 gr (or tripoli)*

Linseed oil: 25 gr

Rectified turpentine spirit: 25 gr

Sulfuric acid: 15 gr ***


Add the acid LAST and shake well.



***VERY IMPORTANT:

The sulfuric acid must be added to the water (so as to avoid boiling, spills, and burns), not the other way round!


*Blanc d’Espagne or Blanc de Meudon or Blanc de Troyes = calcium carbonate.


This popote is used 2 ways:


- to get the dirt off all types of violin varnish;

- to polish the varnish: put some popote on a cloth pad, then add on a little bit of Blanc d’Espagne with a little linseed oil.



For my research, I use an outside mold, so that when I change a back or top plate on several violins in the white, I can be sure that the edges will be correct without modifying the frequency. 

 

 

www.kreitpatrick.com

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Ben Conovers:


The 12 violins are all made from the "Betts" model, so as to tune the plates to different frequencies and compare the different tones obtained for a single model. The area (flat surface) of this model is sufficient to tune the A0 cavity mode frequency to 270/272 Hz without difficulty, with limited f-hole aperture area in order to avoid dispersion of harmonics upon exiting the violin body.

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Two links to video auditions:

Juner Brothers 1857 Newcastle upon Tyne composite

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/14995534@N05/8457605232/in/photostream

 

del Gesu "Ole Bull" copy op8 in the white:

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/14995534@N05/8457685372/in/photostream/

 

White violins sound so open and ringy. It is as if it needs some stiffness

...some resistance to sound more focused.

They sound different newly varnished

and change after about 5 months as the varnish cures.

 

Any thoughts or comments on sound of violins in the white vs finished?

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Any thoughts or comments on sound of violins in the white vs finished?

White violins sound lively, but rough and unrefined, or wild... sometimes wolfy.  I suspect it is mostly the damping of the varnish that evens things out, although I do know from the upward shift in resonant frequencies that some stiffness is added too.

 

 

On my bench (and in the back yard), the "High-Q Fiddle #2" is slowly approaching completion.  A week ago unvarnished and then today.  It is a long way from looking Cremonese, but I'm reasonably pleased with the look it does have. 

 

post-25192-0-31777700-1360609194_thumb.jpgpost-25192-0-28584700-1360609196_thumb.jpg

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A lot of color was in the wood to start with (lightly baked), some came from terpene in the ground, and then more came from the iron oxide. 

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